Jack Hendricks

John Charles Hendricks (April 9, 1875 – May 13, 1943) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played parts of two seasons in Major League Baseball as an outfielder, but is best known as the manager of the Cincinnati Reds from 1924 to 1929.

Jack Hendricks
Outfielder / Manager
Born: April 9, 1875
Joliet, Illinois
Died: May 13, 1943 (aged 68)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 12, 1902, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 1903, for the Washington Senators
MLB statistics
Batting average.207
Runs batted in4
Home runs0
Teams
As player

As manager

Playing career

Hendricks' brief playing career consisted of half a game with the New York Giants and two with the Chicago Orphans in 1902, and 32 games with the Washington Senators in 1903 following the death of Ed Delahanty.

Managerial career

After retiring as a player, he started managing in the minor leagues, eventually getting his major league opportunity when Miller Huggins was fired by the St. Louis Cardinals after the 1917 season. After a 51–78 record and a last-place finish, Hendricks quit. In the 1924 season, the Reds had reported to spring training in Orlando, Florida when their manager Pat Moran died of Bright's disease. Hendricks, who had resigned his post as athletic director of the Knights of Columbus to become a Reds coach that year, took over the club. His best finish as manager was second place in the 1926 season, behind his former team, the Cardinals. He was fired in 1929 after a seventh-place finish. His overall managerial record was 520–528 (.496).

Hendricks held a law degree from Northwestern University Law School and was admitted to the bar in the state of Illinois.[1] Hendricks was one of a select group of major league managers to hold a law degree or pass a state bar. Other include James Henry O'Rourke, Miller Huggins, Branch Rickey (his successor in St. Louis), John Montgomery Ward, Hughie Jennings, Muddy Ruel, and Tony La Russa.[2]

Death

Hendricks died in Chicago at age 68.[3]

References

  1. ^ Ed Edmonds and Frank J. Houdek, Baseball Meets the Law (2017) p. 2028
  2. ^ Ed Edmonds and Frank J. Houdek, Baseball Meets the Law (2017) p. 2012
  3. ^ "The Pittsburgh Press - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.

External links

1902 Chicago Orphans season

The 1902 Chicago Orphans season was the 31st season of the Chicago Orphans franchise, the 27th in the National League and the 10th at West Side Park. The Orphans finished fifth in the National League with a record of 68–69.

1902 New York Giants season

The 1902 New York Giants season was the franchise's 20th season. The team finished in eighth place, last, in the National League with a 48–88 record, 53.5 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates. Their .353 winning percentage remains (as of 2016) the worst in franchise history.

1918 Major League Baseball season

The 1918 Major League Baseball season featured a reduced schedule due to American participation in World War I.

1918 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1918 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 37th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 27th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 51–78 during the season and finished 8th in the National League. It would be the last time the Cardinals would finish in last place until 1990, when they finished sixth in the National League East.

1924 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1924 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83–70, 10 games behind the New York Giants.

1924 Major League Baseball season

The 1924 Major League Baseball season.

1925 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1925 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 80–73, 15 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1925 Major League Baseball season

The 1925 Major League Baseball season.

1926 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1926 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with 87 wins and 67 losses, 2 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1926 Major League Baseball season

The 1926 Major League Baseball season.

1927 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1927 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 75–78, 18½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1927 Major League Baseball season

The 1927 Major League Baseball season began in April 1927 and ended with the World Series in October. No no-hitters were thrown during the season.

The New York Yankees, whose lineup featured Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, dominated the American League with 110 wins. The Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in the World Series.

1928 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1928 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 78–74, 16 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1928 Major League Baseball season

The 1928 Major League Baseball season.

1929 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1929 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 66–88, 33 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1929 Major League Baseball season

The 1929 Major League Baseball season.

John Hendricks (disambiguation)

John Hendricks may refer to:

Jack Hendricks (1875–1943), American baseball player and manager

John Hendricks (born 1952), American television executive

John Allen Hendricks (born 1970), American academic

John R. Hendricks (1929–2007), Canadian mathematician

John Shannon Hendrix (born 1959), American architectural historian and philosopher

John W. Hendrix (born 1942), American armed forces general and commander

Johny Hendricks (born 1983), American wrestler and mixed martial artist

Jon Hendricks (1921–2017), American jazz musician

Jon Henricks (born 1935), Australian swimmer

Kent McCord

Kent Franklin McWhirter (born September 26, 1942), known by his stage name Kent McCord, is an American actor, best known for his role as Officer Jim Reed on the television series Adam-12.

The Night Riders (1939 film)

The Night Riders is a 1939 American "Three Mesquiteers" Western film starring John Wayne, Ray "Crash" Corrigan, and Max Terhune. Wayne played the lead in eight of the fifty-one films in the popular series. The director was George Sherman.

Languages

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