Jack Gaughan

John Brian Francis "Jack" Gaughan (September 24, 1930 – July 21, 1985)[1] was an American science fiction artist and illustrator who won the Hugo Award several times. Working primarily with Donald A. Wollheim at Ace Books, and DAW Books from 1971, his simple linear style brought to life images of such works as Andre Norton's Witch World novels and E. E. Smith's Lensmen and Skylark novels (for which he did two related sets of Pyramid Books covers). His broad visual vocabulary enabled him to render the objects, spaceships and scenes in whatever was presented to him as they were described in the books and stories he illustrated. That was especially an accomplishment as many of these authors drew on their knowledge of esoteric subjects for their imagery. This ability made him very popular among people with an engineering background.

During most of Ejler Jakobsson's tenure as editor of Galaxy Science Fiction from 1969 to 1974, Gaughan did all the illustration and much of the design that went on in the magazine. In addition, many of the books he did for Ace featured hand-lettered titled pages, frontispieces, or maps with Gaughan's distinctive calligraphy. One example is its 1966 edition of Alan Garner's The Weirdstone of Brisingamen.[2] (Ace replaced the Gaughan cover illustration in its second printing, 1978.)[3] L. Sprague de Camp's 1967 anthology, The Fantastic Swordsmen, included a Gaughan map before each of the eight collected stories.[4] His maps also grace the Ace first editions of some Witch World novels – including the 1963 first edition of the first one[5] – and Mark S. Geston's Lords of the Starship (title page and map[6]).

Gaughan illustrated the covers and hand-lettered title pages for the unauthorized first paperback edition of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, which Ace released in 1965.[7]

Beside his professional work, he was a frequent contributor to SF fan magazines. In his heyday he was often nominated for Hugo Awards for both professional artist and best fan artist simultaneously. Locus ran a column by him for a while.

In his memory, the New England Science Fiction Association presents the annual Jack Gaughan Award for best emerging science fiction illustrator.

Gaughan was posthumously inducted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2015.[8][9]

Galaxy 196208
Gaughan provided the cover illustration for Jack Vance's "The Dragon Masters" in 1962

References

  1. ^ Jack Gaughan at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved 2015-07-17. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  2. ^ "Publication Listing : The Weirdstone of Brisingamen". Isfdb.org. Retrieved 2015-09-18.
  3. ^ "Publication Listing : The Weirdstone of Brisingamen". Isfdb.org. Retrieved 2015-09-18.
  4. ^ "Publication Listing : The Fantastic Swordsmen". Isfdb.org. Retrieved 2015-09-18.
  5. ^ "Witch World Universe - Series Bibliography". Isfdb.org. Retrieved 2015-09-13.
  6. ^ "Publication Listing". Isfdb.org. Retrieved 2015-09-13.
  7. ^ "Publication Listing". Isfdb.org. Retrieved 2015-09-13.
  8. ^ "2015 SF&F Hall of Fame Inductees & James Gunn Fundraiser". June 12, 2015. Locus Publications. Retrieved 2015-07-17.
  9. ^ "Jack Gaughan: a repeat Hugo Award-winning science fiction artist and illustrator". Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame. EMP Museum (empmuseum.org). Retrieved 2015-09-10.

External links

25th World Science Fiction Convention

The 25th World Science Fiction Convention, also known as NyCon 3 or Nycon 3, was held August 31-September 4, 1967, at the Statler Hilton Hotel in New York, New York, United States.

The chairmen were Ted White and Dave Van Arnam. The guests of honor were Lester del Rey (pro) and Bob Tucker (fan). The toastmaster was Harlan Ellison. Total attendance was approximately 1,500.

27th World Science Fiction Convention

The 27th World Science Fiction Convention, also known as St. Louiscon, was held August 28–September 1, 1969, at the Chase Park Plaza Hotel in St. Louis, Missouri, United States, under the auspices of OSFA, the Ozark Science Fiction Association.

The chairpersons were Ray Fisher and Joyce Fisher. The guests of honor were Jack Gaughan (professional) and Eddie Jones (fan artist). Jones, the Trans Atlantic Fan Fund (TAFF) winner, replaced Ted White. The toastmaster was Harlan Ellison. Total attendance was 1,534 from a registration exceeding 2,001, making it the largest Worldcon to that point in both regards.

Analog's Lighter Side

Analog's Lighter Side is the fourth in a series of anthologies of science fiction stories drawn from Analog magazine and edited by then-current Analog editor Stanley Schmidt. It was first published in paperback by Davis Publications in 1982, with a hardcover edition following from The Dial Press in January 1983.The book collects thirteen short stories, novelettes and novellas and one poem, all first published in Analog and its predecessor title Astounding, together with an introduction by Schmidt. Most of the pieces are accompanied by the original illustrations from their initial magazine appearances, by artists Edd Cartier, Kelly Freas, John Sanchez, Jack Gaughan, and Vincent Di Fate.

Bruce Jensen

Bruce Jensen (born 1962 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is a US illustrator who has created book covers for science fiction authors such as Kim Stanley Robinson, Neal Stephenson, Charles Sheffield, Joe Haldeman, Linda Nagata, Kelley Eskridge, and Philip K. Dick. His covers were described by Nagata as "deftly illustrat[ing] the mood, the feeling of the book". He also drew the unfinished Neuromancer graphic novel in 1989. He won the 1995 Jack Gaughan Award for Best Emerging Artist.

Daniel Dos Santos

Daniel Dos Santos (born 1978) is an American speculative fiction artist whose work has appeared on book covers by publishers Tor, Bantam, Pyr, and many more, as well as a variety of magazine and comic covers and interiors. He has been nominated for the Hugo Award seven times.

A love of comics led Dos Santos to an interest in art. During his final year of high school, he served an internship with Steven Stroud. Following graduation, he attended the School of Visual Arts in New York City, where he began to focus on speculative art. Dos Santos and Stroud founded a studio in Shelton, Connecticut, after he graduated.Dos Santos, along with Irene Gallo, has hosted a series of live art demonstrations at the Society of Illustrators in Manhattan called "Art Out Loud." The series began as a collaborative painting demo, but changed over time to better reflect the way in which artists actually work.Dos Santos has been nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist each year since 2009. Dos Santos received the Rhodes Family Award for special achievement in illustration in 2000, as well as the Starr Foundation Award for 2001. He has received the 2007 Jack Gaughan Award for Best Emerging Artist and won the first Chesley Award for Best Cover Illustration – Paperback in the same year.

Edward E. Smith Memorial Award

The Edward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction, or "Skylark", annually recognizes someone for lifetime contributions to science fiction, "both through work in the field and by exemplifying the personal qualities which made the late "Doc" Smith well-loved by those who knew him." It is presented by the New England Science Fiction Association at its annual convention, Boskone, to someone chosen by a vote of NESFA members. The trophy is a large lens mounted on a simple plinth.The award was inaugurated in 1966, the year after Smith's death. Fifty-one people have been honored in 49 years to 2015 (Hal Clement received the award twice, in 1969 and 1997).

Skylark recipients

Energumen (magazine)

Energumen was an influential science fiction fanzine edited by Mike Glicksohn and Susan Wood Glicksohn from 1970–1973 (fifteen issues), with a special final "11th Anniversary Issue!!" [sic] in 1981 after Susan's death. It won the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine in 1973, after having been a nominee for the Hugo Award for both the prior years.Contributors included (inter alia) Alicia Austin, [John Baglow], John Bangsund, George Barr, Bill Bowers, Terry Carr, Phil Foglio, Jack Gaughan, Joe Haldeman, Joan Hanke-Woods, Jay Kinney, Dave Langford, Tim Kirk, Patrick Nielsen Hayden, Bill Rotsler, Bob Shaw, Stu Shiffman, Dan Steffan, Ted White and Gene Wolfe.

Energumen ceased publication in 1973 with #15, and the Glicksohns' marriage broke up; but planning for a special issue was already well under way at the time of Susan Wood's sudden death in November 1980. Issue 16 ("JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT IT WAS SAFE TO BIND YOUR FANZINES") was published by Glicksohn in September 1981.

Fantasy Book

Fantasy Book is a defunct semi-professional American science fiction magazine that published eight issues between 1947 and 1951. The editor was William Crawford, and the publisher was Crawford's Fantasy Publishing Company, Inc. Crawford had problems distributing the magazine, and his budget limited the quality of the paper he could afford and the artwork he was able to buy, but he attracted submissions from some well-known writers, including Isaac Asimov, Frederik Pohl, A. E. van Vogt, Robert Bloch, and L. Ron Hubbard. The best-known story to appear in the magazine was Cordwainer Smith's first sale, "Scanners Live in Vain", which was later included in the first Science Fiction Hall of Fame anthology, and is now regarded as one of Smith's finest works. Jack Gaughan, later an award-winning science fiction artist, made his first professional sale to Fantasy Book, for the cover illustrating Smith's story.

Gaughan

The surname Gaughan is derived from the Old Gaelic name Ua Gáibhtheacháin, which dates to before the 10th century. Its meaning is "male descendant of a fierce warrior". However, other translations claim it means "anxious one", demonstrating their expeditious and industrious nature. Historically, Irish families were named after the first chief of their tribe. In this case, it is evident that this clan descends from an illustrious warrior. Other derivatives of Ua Gáibhtheacháin are: O'Gaughan, Gavan, Gavaghan, Gavahan, Gavigan and Gahan.

As Old Ireland evolved, the surname O'Gáibtheacháin was shortened to O'Gacháin. This name was later anglicized into Gaughan.

Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist is given each year for artists of works related to science fiction or fantasy released in the previous calendar year.The Professional Artist award has been given annually under several names since 1955, with the exception of 1957. The inaugural 1953 Hugo awards recognized "Best Interior Illustrator" and "Best Cover Artist" categories, awarded to Virgil Finlay and a tie between Hannes Bok and Ed Emshwiller, respectively. The Best Professional Artist award was simply named "Best Artist" in 1955 and 1956, was not awarded in 1957, and was named "Outstanding Artist" in 1958, finally changing to its current name the following year. Beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954, and in each case an award for professional artist was given.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. The awards in 1955 and 1958 did not include any recognition of runner-up artists, but since 1959 all six candidates have been recorded. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near Labor Day, and in a different city around the world each year.During the 69 nomination years, 79 artists have been nominated; 23 of these have won, including co-winners and Retro Hugos. Michael Whelan has received the most awards, with 13 wins out of 24 nominations. Frank Kelly Freas has 11 wins and 28 nominations, the most nominations of any artist. Other artists with large numbers of wins or nominations include Bob Eggleton with 8 wins out of 23 nominations, Virgil Finlay with 4 out of 13, Ed Emshwiller with 4 out of 9, and Don Maitz with 2 out of 17. David A. Cherry and Thomas Canty are tied for the most nominations without an award at 10 each.

Jack Gaughan Award

The Jack Gaughan Award for Best Emerging Artist is an American award honoring the memory of illustrator Jack Gaughan. Because the latter felt it was important to encourage and recognize new blood in the field, the New England Science Fiction Association, Inc., presents the Gaughan Award annually to an emerging artist (an artist who has become a professional within the past five years) chosen by a panel of judges.

The winner of the Gaughan Award is announced during Boskone, NESFA's annual convention.

1986 Stephen Hickman

1987 Val Lakey Lindahn

1988 Bob Eggleton

1989 Dell Harris

1990 Keith Parkinson

1991 Richard Hescox

1992 Jody Lee

1993 Nicholas Jainschigg

1994 Dorian Vallejo

1995 Bruce Jensen

1996 Charles Lang

1997 Lisa Snellings-Clark

1998 Donato Giancola

1999 Brom

2000 Stephen Daniele

2001 Mark Zug

2002 Terese Nielsen

2003 Martina Pilcerova

2004 Justin Sweet

2005 Adam Rex

2006 Scott M. Fischer

2007 Dan Dos Santos

2008 Shelly Wan

2009 Eric Fortune

2010 Tyler Jacobson

2014 Sam Burley

2016 Tommy Arnold

2017 Kirbi Fagan

Lore of the Witch World

Lore of the Witch World is a collection of science fantasy short stories by American writer Andre Norton, forming part of her Witch World series. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in September 1980, and has been reprinted numerous times since. Early printings had cover art by Michael Whelan and a frontispiece by Jack Gaughan.

New England Science Fiction Association

The New England Science Fiction Association, or NESFA, is a science fiction club centered in the New England area. It was founded in 1967, "by fans who wanted to do things in addition to socializing"[1]. NESFA is currently registered as a non-profit literary organization under IRS section 501(c)(3).

The organization holds regular meetings (at their dedicated site, the NESFA Clubhouse) of and for members and other interested parties. A weekly meeting is held most Wednesday evenings, for socializing, projects, and miscellaneous business. Two weekend meetings are held every month: a Business Meeting (for administration), and the Other Meeting. The club also publishes a regular newsletter, Instant Message. There are two book groups that meet on a monthly basis, as well as a monthly Game Day, and a monthly Game Night. In addition, there is a monthly Media day. This involves showings of two episodes of an anime series, two TV series episodes and a movie choice. All are science fiction/fantasy related. There is currently a NESFA Short Story Contest, accepting submissions from amateur writers seeking to improve their science fiction/fantasy writing through constructive critical analysis from expert readers, editors, and professional writers.

Spell of the Witch World

Spell of the Witch World is a collection of science fantasy short fiction by American writer Andre Norton, forming part of her Witch World series. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in April 1972, and has been reprinted numerous times since. It has the distinction of being the first book released by that publisher. Early printings had cover art and a frontispiece by artist Jack Gaughan; later printings replaced the cover art (but not the frontispiece) with new art by Michael Whelan. The first hardcover edition was a photographic reprint of the DAW edition published by Gregg Press in 1977. It featured a new frontispiece by Alice D. Phalen and endpaper maps of the Witch World by Barbi Johnson.

The 1973 Annual World's Best SF

The 1973 Annual World's Best SF is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Arthur W. Saha, the second volume in a series of nineteen. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in May 1973, followed by a hardcover edition issued in August of the same year by the same publisher as a selection of the Science Fiction Book Club. For the hardcover edition the original cover art of Jack Gaughan was replaced by a new cover painting by William S. Shields. The paperback edition was reissued by DAW in December 1978 under the variant title Wollheim's World's Best SF: Series Two, this time with cover art by Larry Oritz.

The book collects ten novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction by Wollheim. Most of the stories were previously published in 1972 in the magazines The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Amazing Science Fiction, Analog, and Galaxy Magazine, and the anthologies New Writings in SF 20 and Infinity Three. One story was first published in this anthology.

The 1974 Annual World's Best SF

The 1974 Annual World's Best SF is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Arthur W. Saha, the third volume in a series of nineteen. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in May 1974, followed by a hardcover edition issued in September of the same year by the same publisher as a selection of the Science Fiction Book Club. For the hardcover edition the original cover art of Jack Gaughan was replaced by a new cover painting by Victor Valla. The paperback edition was reissued by DAW in December 1979 under the variant title Wollheim's World's Best SF: Series Three, this time with cover art by Vicente Segrelles. A British hardcover edition was published by The Elmfield Press in October 1975 under the variant title The World's Best SF Short Stories No. 1.

The book collects ten novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction by Wollheim. Most of the stories were previously published in 1973 in the magazines Galaxy, Worlds of If, Vertex, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, and Amazing Science Fiction, and the anthologies View from Another Shore and New Writings in SF 22.

The 1975 Annual World's Best SF

The 1975 Annual World's Best SF is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Arthur W. Saha, the fourth volume in a series of nineteen. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in May 1975, followed by a hardcover edition issued in September of the same year by the same publisher as a selection of the Science Fiction Book Club. For the hardcover edition the original cover art of Jack Gaughan was replaced by a new cover painting by Richard V. Corben. The paperback edition was reissued by DAW in December 1980 under the variant title Wollheim's World's Best SF: Series Four, this time with cover art by Vicente Segrelles. A British hardcover edition was published by The Elmfield Press in November 1976 under the variant title The World's Best SF Short Stories No. 2.

The book collects ten novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction by Wollheim. The stories were previously published in 1974 in the magazines

Analog, Galaxy, Amazing Science Fiction, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, and Worlds of If, and the anthology Stellar 1.

The 1978 Annual World's Best SF

The 1978 Annual World's Best SF is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Arthur W. Saha, the seventh volume in a series of nineteen. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in May 1978, followed by a hardcover edition issued in August of the same year by the same publisher as a selection of the Science Fiction Book Club. For the hardcover edition the original cover art of Jack Gaughan was replaced by a new cover painting by Richard Powers. The paperback edition was reissued by DAW in 1983 under the variant title Wollheim's World's Best SF: Series Seven, this time with cover art by Graham Wildridge. A British hardcover edition was published by Dennis Dobson in May 1980 under the variant title The World's Best SF 5'.

The book collects ten novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction by Wollheim. The stories were previously published in 1977 in the magazines The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, and Cosmos Science Fiction and Fantasy Magazine.

The Book of Frank Herbert

The Book of Frank Herbert (1973) is a collection of ten short stories written by science fiction author Frank Herbert. The first edition of this book contained cover art and interior artwork by Jack Gaughan. Three of the stories in this collection appeared here for the first time.

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