Jack Adams

John James "Jack" Adams (June 14, 1894 – May 1, 1968) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player, coach and general manager in the National Hockey League and Pacific Coast Hockey Association. He was a Hall of Fame player during a 10-year professional career with Toronto, Vancouver and Ottawa.

He is best known for his 36-year association with the Detroit Red Wings of the National Hockey League as head coach and as a general manager. He held the record of winningest coach in Red Wings history before being surpassed by Mike Babcock in 2014. He later became the first president of the Central Professional Hockey League. Adams is the only person to have won the Stanley Cup as a player, coach, and general manager.[1]

Jack Adams
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1959
The head and torso of a male caucasian hockey player. He is wearing a sweater with two buttons on the chest and two on the collar. The words "Jack Adams right wing" are written in the lower right corner.
Born June 14, 1894
Fort William, Ontario, Canada
Died May 1, 1968 (aged 73)
Detroit, Michigan, United States
Height 5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight 175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Right
Played for Toronto Arenas
Vancouver Millionaires
Toronto St. Patricks
Ottawa Senators
Playing career 1917–1927

Playing career

Born in Fort William, Ontario, Adams began his career with the Fort William Maple Leafs in 1914 of the NMHL, and played for the Calumet Miners a year later. In 1916, he joined the intermediate Peterborough 247th Battalion of the Ontario Hockey Association and the next season moved up to the senior Sarnia Sailors. His brother, Bill also was a professional hockey player.

Adams turned pro in 1917 upon joining the Toronto Arenas of the NHL, earning the reputation as a physical, bruising player. Although he participated in the NHL playoffs, he did not play in any games in the 1918 Stanley Cup Finals against the Vancouver Millionaires when the Torontos won the trophy.

In December 1919 he was lured west to join the Millionaires, where he flourished as a player, leading the league in scoring in 1921–22, when he centred a line with Alf Skinner and Smokey Harris. He played in two Stanley Cup series for Vancouver, and was the star of the 1922 series, scoring 6 goals in 5 games.

Coming off that season, he returned east to join the Toronto St. Patricks and played four seasons in Toronto on a line with Babe Dye. Adams was the team's leading scorer in 1925–26.

The next season, he joined the Ottawa Senators, finishing his playing career as it began, with a second Stanley Cup championship. His NHL stats included 83 goals, 32 assists in 173 games played.

Adams was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1959 as a player.

Coaching and managing career

Soon after his retirement, he became coach and general manager of the second-year Detroit Cougars at the suggestion of NHL president Frank Calder.

At first, the team struggled under his leadership, making the playoffs only two times in his first five years at the helm. A name change to the Detroit Falcons in 1930 did not improve the team's performance. Detroit's fortunes changed in 1932, when Chicago grain merchant James E. Norris bought the Falcons and renamed them the Detroit Red Wings. Norris gave the Red Wings the financing they needed to become an NHL power. Adams led the team to three Stanley Cups before stepping down in 1947 to concentrate on his duties as general manager. His coaching career tallied 413 wins, 390 losses and 161 ties, including a 52–52–1 coaching record in the playoffs. Most of those wins came without a contract; when Norris bought the team he'd torn up Adams' contract and given him a year on his job on probation and a handshake. As it turned out, one year became 15 years. Adams is the second-winningest coach in Red Wings history, behind Mike Babcock.

By 1947, Adams had built a farm team system which trained Alex Delvecchio, Terry Sawchuk, Ted Lindsay, Red Kelly, Sid Abel, and most notably Gordie Howe. It was this core group of players which led the Red Wings to seven straight regular season first-place finishes from 1948 to 1955, along with four more Cups—making Adams the only man to have his name on the Stanley Cup as a player, coach and general manager.

Adams was known for being wary of letting his teams get complacent, and was not shy about orchestrating blockbuster trades to keep them on their toes—a philosophy which won him the nickname "Trader Jack." His impulse was slightly restrained after Norris died in 1952 and was succeeded by his daughter, Marguerite Norris. She and Adams never got along very well. While she could have summarily fired Adams since he was still without a contract, she did not do so.

However, Marguerite was forced to turn over control of the team to her younger brother, Bruce Norris, in 1955 after losing an intrafamily struggle. Bruce voiced full confidence in Adams, and the trading resumed anew. During their seven-season run in first place, many thought the Red Wings would rule the league for years to come.

In 1957, Adams traded Ted Lindsay to Chicago because of union-organizing efforts and had other players affiliated with the effort sent to the minors. As part of the union busting efforts, Adams spread fake rumours attributing Lindsay as criticizing his former teammates. Adams also showed a fake contract to Detroit reporters, claiming Lindsay was being paid $25,000 per year, when he was being paid $13,000.[2] These efforts are dramatized in the TV movie Net Worth.

The efforts resulted in most of the core of this team leaving town and eventually led to Adams being fired in 1963. His 36-year tenure as general manager is the longest in NHL history. He served 31 of those years on a handshake; after 1932 he never signed a contract with the Wings.

Adams had also been involved in an incident in 1942, when he had an outburst due to his belief of biased penalty calling, which led to a fit of rage and ultimately a referee getting punched in game three of the 1942 Stanley Cup Final, thus becoming the first coach to be suspended in a Final.

In 1963, Adams became founding president of the Central Hockey League, a post he held until his death at his desk in 1968.

Awards and achievements

Statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1914–15 Fort William Maple Leafs NHML 2 4 0 4 3
1915–16 Calumet Miners NMHL
1916–17 Peterborough 247th OHA-Int.
1917–18 Sarnia Sailors OHA-Sr. 6 15 0 15
1917–18 Toronto Arenas NHL 8 0 0 0 31 2 1 0 1 6
1918–19 Toronto Arenas NHL 17 3 3 6 35
1919–20 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 22 9 6 15 18 2 0 0 0 0
1920–21 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 24 17 12 29 60 2 3 0 3 0
1921–22 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 24 26 4 30 24 2 1 0 1 0
1921–22 Vancouver Millionaires West-P 2 0 0 0 12
1921–22 Vancouver Millionaires St-Cup 5 6 1 7 18
1922–23 Toronto St. Patricks NHL 23 19 9 28 64
1923–24 Toronto St. Patricks NHL 22 14 4 18 51
1924–25 Toronto St. Patricks NHL 27 21 10 31 67 2 1 0 1 7
1925–26 Toronto St. Patricks NHL 36 21 5 26 52
1926–27 Ottawa Senators NHL 40 5 1 6 66 6 0 0 0 0
NHL totals 173 83 32 115 366 10 2 0 2 13
PCHA totals 70 52 22 74 102 6 4 0 4 0
St-Cup totals 5 6 1 7 18

Sources:[3][4]

Coaching statistics

 Stanley Cup champions dagger   Division champions Up-arrow   Led league in points Hash-tag 

Adams' career head coaching statistics with the Detroit NHL franchise
NHL season Franchise season Division Regular season[5][6][7][8] Postseason
Finish GC W L T Pts Win% GC W L T Win% Result
1927–28 1927–28[a] American[b] 4th 44 19 19 6 44 .500 Did not qualify
1928–29 1928–29 American 3rd 44 19 16 9 47 .534 2 0 2 0 .000 Lost Quarterfinals to Toronto Maple Leafs, 2–7 (TG)[9]
1929–30 1929–30 American 4th 44 14 24 6 34 .386 Did not qualify
1930–31 1930–31[c] American 4th 44 16 21 7 39 .443 Did not qualify
1931–32 1931–32 American 3rd 48 18 20 10 46 .479 2 0 1 1 .250 Lost Quarterfinals to Montreal Maroons, 1–3 (TG)[10]
1932–33 1932–33[d] American 2nd 48 25 15 8 58 .604 4 2 2 0 .500 Won Quarterfinals vs. Montreal Maroons, 5–2 (TG)
Lost Semifinals to New York Rangers, 3–6 (TG)[11]
1933–34 1933–34 AmericanDivision champions 1st 48 24 14 10 58 .604 9 4 5 0 .444 Won Semifinals vs. Toronto Maple Leafs, 3–2
Lost Stanley Cup Finals to Chicago Black Hawks, 1–3[12]
1934–35 1934–35 American 4th 48 19 22 7 45 .469 Did not qualify
1935–36 1935–36 AmericanDivision champions 1st 48 24 16 8 56Led league in points .583 7 6 1 0 .536 Won Semifinals vs. Montreal Maroons, 3–0
Won Stanley Cup Finals vs. Toronto Maple Leafs, 3–1[13]Stanley Cup champions
1936–37 1936–37 AmericanDivision champions 1st 48 25 14 9 59Led league in points .615 10 6 4 0 .600 Won Semifinals vs. Montreal Canadiens, 3–2
Won Stanley Cup Finals vs. New York Rangers, 3–2[14]Stanley Cup champions
1937–38 1937–38 American 4th 48 12 25 11 35 .365 Did not qualify
1938–39 1938–39 [e] 5th 48 18 24 6 42 .438 6 3 3 0 .500 Won Quarterfinals vs. Montreal Canadiens, 2–1
Lost Semifinals to Toronto Maple Leafs, 1–2[15]
1939–40 1939–40 5th 48 16 26 6 38 .396 5 2 3 0 .400 Won Quarterfinals vs. New York Americans, 2–1
Lost Semifinals to Toronto Maple Leafs, 0–2[16]
1940–41 1940–41 3rd 48 21 16 11 53 .552 9 4 5 0 .444 Won Quarterfinals vs. New York Rangers, 2–1
Won Semifinals vs. Chicago Black Hawks, 2–0
Lost Stanley Cup Finals to Boston Bruins, 0–4[17]
1941–42 1941–42 5th 48 19 25 4 42 .438 12 7 5 0 .583 Won Quarterfinals vs. Montreal Canadiens, 2–1
Won Semifinals vs. Boston Bruins, 2–0
Lost Stanley Cup Finals to Toronto Maple Leafs, 3–4[18]
1942–43 1942–43 1st 50 25 14 11 61Led league in points .610 10 8 2 0 .800 Won Semifinals vs. Toronto Maple Leafs, 4–2
Won Stanley Cup Finals vs. Boston Bruins, 4–0[19]Stanley Cup champions
1943–44 1943–44 2nd 50 26 18 6 58 .580 5 1 4 0 .200 Lost Semifinals to Chicago Black Hawks, 1–4[20]
1944–45 1944–45 2nd 50 31 14 5 67 .670 14 7 7 0 .500 Won Semifinals vs. Boston Bruins, 4–3
Lost Stanley Cup Finals to Toronto Maple Leafs, 3–4[21]
1945–46 1945–46 4th 50 20 20 10 50 .500 5 1 4 0 .200 Lost Semifinals to Boston Bruins, 1–4[22]
1946–47 1946–47 4th 60 22 27 11 55 .458 5 1 4 0 .200 Lost Semifinals to Toronto Maple Leafs, 1–4[23]
Totals 964 413 390 161 987 .512 105 52 52 1 .500

Notes

  • a From the 1926–27 season through the 1929–30 season, the Detroit NHL franchise was known as the Cougars.[5][6]
  • b From the 1926–27 season through the 1937–38 season, the Detroit NHL franchise played in the American Division.[6][7][8]
  • c From the 1930–31 season through the 1931–32 season, the Detroit NHL franchise was known as the Falcons.[5][7]
  • d Since the 1932–33 season, the Detroit NHL franchise has been known as the Red Wings.[5][8]
  • e From the 1938–39 season through the 1966–67 season, the NHL had no divisions.[24]

See also

List of Detroit Red Wings award winners
List of Detroit Red Wings seasons

References

  • Coleman, Charles L. The Trail of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1, 1893–1926 inc. p. 572.
  1. ^ http://www.legendsofhockey.net/LegendsOfHockey/jsp/LegendsMember.jsp?mem=p195901&type=Player&page=bio&list=ByName
  2. ^ Cruise, David (1991). Net Worth. Viking Books.
  3. ^ "Jack Adams (b. 1894) hockey statistics and profile". Retrieved July 22, 2013.
  4. ^ "Jack Adams NHL statistics". Retrieved September 28, 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d National Hockey League (2013). NHL Official Guide & Record Book 2013. Triumph. p. 51. ISBN 978-1-60078-785-0.
  6. ^ a b c "Detroit Cougars Statistics and History". The Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c "Detroit Falcons Statistics and History". The Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c "Detroit Red Wings Statistics and History". The Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  9. ^ "1929 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  10. ^ "1932 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  11. ^ "1933 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  12. ^ "1934 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  13. ^ "1936 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  14. ^ "1937 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  15. ^ "1939 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  16. ^ "1940 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  17. ^ "1941 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  18. ^ "1942 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  19. ^ "1943 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  20. ^ "1944 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  21. ^ "1945 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  22. ^ "1946 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  23. ^ "1947 NHL Playoff Summary". Hockey-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
  24. ^ "Playoff Formats". National Hockey League. Archived from the original on December 17, 2010. Retrieved May 24, 2013.

External links

Preceded by
Duke Keats
Head coach of the Detroit Red Wings
1927–1947
Succeeded by
Tommy Ivan
Preceded by
Art Duncan
General Manager of Detroit Red Wings
1927–62
Succeeded by
Sid Abel
Al Arbour

Alger Joseph Arbour (November 1, 1932 – August 28, 2015) was a Canadian ice hockey player, coach, and executive. He is third to Joel Quenneville for games coached in National Hockey League history and fourth all-time in wins, behind Scotty Bowman, Joel Quenneville and Ken Hitchcock. Under Arbour, the New York Islanders won four consecutive Stanley Cups from 1980 to 1983. Born in Sudbury, Ontario, Arbour played amateur hockey as a defenceman with the Windsor Spitfires of the Ontario Hockey League. He played his first professional games with the Detroit Red Wings in 1953. Claimed by the Chicago Black Hawks in 1958, Arbour would help the team win a championship in 1961. Arbour played with the Toronto Maple Leafs for the next five years, winning another Cup in 1962. He was selected by the St. Louis Blues in their 1967 expansion draft and played his final four seasons with the team.

During his last year with the Blues, Arbour was hired mid-season to coach the team. In 107 games, he led them to a 42–40–25 record, but only one playoff series win. After a woeful expansion year, the New York Islanders hired Arbour as coach in 1973. Arbour led the team to a winning record every season from 1974–75 until he stepped down in 1985–86. Arbour won nineteen consecutive playoff series, which remains an NHL and North American sports record. He was awarded the Jack Adams Award as the league's top coach in 1979. Upon retiring from the bench, Arbour was named vice-president of player development for the Islanders. He returned to coach the Islanders in the 1988–89 season and remained there through 1993-94, notably upsetting the two-time defending champion Pittsburgh Penguins in the 1993 playoffs. He was awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy for his contributions to the sport and was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1996.

Alain Vigneault

Alain Vigneault (born May 14, 1961) is a Canadian professional ice hockey head coach for the Philadelphia Flyers of the National Hockey League (NHL). Vigneault has previously coached the Montreal Canadiens, Vancouver Canucks, and the New York Rangers in the NHL, as well as in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL). During his career with the Canucks, he won the Jack Adams Award as the NHL's top coach of the year in 2006–07 and has become the team's record holder for wins as a coach. Under Vigneault, Vancouver won back-to-back Presidents' Trophies (2010–11 and 2011–12) and made one Stanley Cup Finals appearance (2011). In his first season with New York, he led the Rangers to their first Stanley Cup Finals appearance (2014) in 20 years.

Prior to his coaching career, Vigneault played professionally as a defenceman for six seasons in the NHL, Central Hockey League and American Hockey League (AHL). In the NHL, he played 42 games over two seasons, 1981–82 and 1982–83, for the St. Louis Blues.

Barry Trotz

Barry Trotz (born July 15, 1962) is a Canadian professional ice hockey coach for the New York Islanders of the National Hockey League (NHL). He is also the former head coach of the NHL's Nashville Predators and the Washington Capitals. He was previously the coach of the American Hockey League (AHL)'s Baltimore Skipjacks and Portland Pirates, with whom he won an AHL championship in 1994. That same year, he won the Louis A.R. Pieri Memorial Award, which is awarded to the outstanding coach in the AHL as voted upon by the AHL Broadcasters and Writers. On February 20, 2013, Lindy Ruff was fired by the Buffalo Sabres, making Trotz the longest-tenured head coach in the NHL. He was also the second-longest tenured coach in the four major North American professional leagues, behind only Gregg Popovich of the National Basketball Association's San Antonio Spurs. On April 14, 2014, the Predators announced Trotz would not return for his 16th season as head coach. On May 26, 2014, Trotz was announced as the new head coach of the Capitals. On June 7, 2018, Trotz won his first Stanley Cup as the head coach, with the Capitals defeating the Vegas Golden Knights in five games, in the franchise's first Stanley Cup championship. On June 21, 2018, Trotz was announced as the new head coach of the Islanders.

Bruce Boudreau

Bruce Allan Boudreau (born January 9, 1955) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey player and coach. He is currently the head coach of the National Hockey League's Minnesota Wild and formerly the head coach of the Washington Capitals and Anaheim Ducks. As a player, Boudreau played professionally for 20 seasons, logging 141 games in the NHL and 30 games in the World Hockey Association (WHA). He played for the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Chicago Black Hawks of the NHL and the Minnesota Fighting Saints of the WHA. Boudreau won the Jack Adams Award for the NHL's most outstanding head coach in the 2007–08 NHL season during his tenure with the Capitals.

Claude Julien (ice hockey)

Claude Julien (born April 23, 1960) is a Canadian professional ice hockey coach and former player. He is currently the head coach of the Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League (NHL). Prior to his firing by the Boston Bruins in 2017, he was the longest tenured head coach in the NHL. He had previously served as head coach of the New Jersey Devils in the NHL, as well as in the American Hockey League (AHL) with the Hamilton Bulldogs. In 2011 he coached the Bruins to the Stanley Cup Finals, against the Vancouver Canucks, winning in 7 games, guiding Boston to their 6th franchise Stanley Cup title. In 2013, he brought Boston to another Stanley Cup Finals, however they would go on to lose the series to the Chicago Blackhawks in 6 games.

Julien was also an assistant coach for Canadian national team at the 2014 Winter Olympics, where he led the team to a gold medal victory.

Jack Adams Award

The Jack Adams Award is awarded annually to the National Hockey League (NHL) coach "adjudged to have contributed the most to his team's success." The league's Coach of the Year award has been presented 40 times to 34 coaches. The winner is selected by a poll of the National Hockey League Broadcasters Association at the end of the regular season. Five coaches have won the award twice, while Pat Burns has won three times, the most of any coach. The award is named in honor of Jack Adams, Hall of Fame player for the Toronto Arenas/St. Patricks, Vancouver Millionaires and Ottawa Senators, and long-time Coach and General Manager of the Detroit Red Wings. It was first awarded at the conclusion of the 1973–74 regular season.

Jacques Demers is the only coach to win the award in consecutive seasons. Five coaches have won the award with two teams: Jacques Lemaire, Pat Quinn, Scotty Bowman, and John Tortorella have won the award twice, while Pat Burns is the only coach to win three times. The franchises with the most Jack Adams Award winners are the Philadelphia Flyers, Detroit Red Wings and Phoenix Coyotes with four winners each, although the Coyotes had two winners in Winnipeg before they moved to Arizona. Bill Barber, Bruce Boudreau and Ken Hitchcock are the only coaches to win the award after replacing the head coach who started the season. Barber took over for Craig Ramsay during the Flyers' 2000–01 season, Boudreau replaced Glen Hanlon a month into the Capitals' 2007–08 season while Hitchcock replaced Davis Payne a month into the Blues' 2011–12 season. The closest vote occurred in 2006, when the winner Lindy Ruff edged out Peter Laviolette by a single point.

Joel Quenneville

Joel Norman Quenneville (born September 15, 1958) is a Canadian–American professional ice hockey coach. He is the current head coach of the Florida Panthers of the National Hockey League (NHL). He has also coached the Colorado Avalanche, St. Louis Blues, and Chicago Blackhawks with whom he won three Stanley Cup titles. On January 14, 2016, he surpassed Al Arbour with his 783rd win as an NHL coach, making Quenneville second only to Scotty Bowman in total wins. He is often referred to by fans and players as "Coach Q" or simply as "Q".

John Tortorella

John Robert Tortorella (born June 24, 1958) is an American ice hockey coach and former player. He is the head coach for the Columbus Blue Jackets of the National Hockey League (NHL). Tortorella was previously the head coach of the Tampa Bay Lightning (2001–2008), the New York Rangers (2009–2013) and the Vancouver Canucks (2013–2014). He led Tampa Bay to the 2004 Stanley Cup championship.

Ken Hitchcock

Kenneth S. Hitchcock (born December 17, 1951) is a Canadian professional ice hockey coach. He is the head coach for the Edmonton Oilers of the National Hockey League (NHL). Hitchcock previously coached the Dallas Stars (1996–2002, 2017–2018), Philadelphia Flyers (2002–2006), Columbus Blue Jackets (2006–2010), and St. Louis Blues (2011–2017). He also served as an assistant coach for the 2014 Canadian Olympic national team. Hitchcock won a Stanley Cup with the Stars in 1999. He is the third winningest coach in NHL history with a total of 823 victories. He was named a 2019 Order of Hockey in Canada recipient.

Lindy Ruff

Lindy Cameron Ruff (born February 17, 1960) is a Canadian assistant coach for the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League (NHL). Ruff was previously the head coach of the Dallas Stars of the NHL, and also the head coach of the Buffalo Sabres from 1997 to 2013, with whom he won the Jack Adams Award as Coach of the Year in 2006. During his playing career, Ruff played in the NHL for the Sabres and Rangers, the former of which he captained.

Ruff was an assistant coach for the 2014 Canadian Olympic Hockey Team.

List of Buffalo Sabres head coaches

The Buffalo Sabres are a professional ice hockey team based in Buffalo, New York. They are members of the Atlantic Division in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). There have been 18 head coaches of the Buffalo Sabres since the team's debut in the 1970–71 NHL season.

Punch Imlach, Scotty Bowman, Marcel Pronovost, Roger Neilson and Phil Housley have all made it to the Hockey Hall of Fame, while Bowman, Lindy Ruff, Dan Bylsma and Ted Nolan have all won the Jack Adams Award, an honor given annually to the National Hockey League coach "adjudged to have contributed the most to his team's success" (Bylsma and Bowman won their awards with other teams). The first head coach, Hall of Famer Punch Imlach, has the lowest winning percentage of any Sabres coach, with a .370 winning percentage during his 120-game tenure. Ron Rolston is a close second with a .372 win percentage in his two partial seasons with the team (compared equally, Rolston would have a worse record since many of Rolston's wins came in shootouts, which did not exist in Imlach's era).

The Sabres have made two appearances in the Stanley Cup Finals, losing four games to two against the Philadelphia Flyers in 1975, under Smith, and again four to two against the Dallas Stars in 1999, under Ruff. Ruff has led the Sabres into the playoffs seven times.Seven of the team's head coaches played for the Sabres during their careers: Floyd Smith, Bill Inglis, Jim Schoenfeld, Craig Ramsay, Rick Dudley, Lindy Ruff and Phil Housley. In addition, two others, Ted Nolan and Dan Bylsma, played for the Rochester Americans at a time when the Americans were the Sabres' top minor-league affiliate.

As of April 2019, the head coaching position is currently vacant following the dismissal of Phil Housley.

List of Calgary Flames head coaches

The Calgary Flames are a professional ice hockey team based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The team is a member of the Pacific Division in the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Flames arrived in Calgary in 1980 after transferring from the city of Atlanta, Georgia, where they were known as the Atlanta Flames from their founding in 1972 until relocation.Al MacNeil remained the Flames' coach when the franchise transferred to Calgary, serving as the team's first coach in Calgary. "Badger Bob" Johnson, who succeeded MacNeil in 1982, is the Flames' all-time leader in games coached and wins. He was behind the bench when the franchise made its first trip to the Stanley Cup final in 1986. Johnson was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1992, a year after his death from cancer. Johnson's successor, Terry Crisp, led the Flames to their only Stanley Cup championship in 1989.The Flames went through several coaches between 1990 and 2003 as the team struggled to find playoff success. Doug Risebrough, Dave King, Pierre Page, Brian Sutter, Don Hay and Greg Gilbert all failed to lead the team past the first round as the Flames endured a 15-year period of playoff futility. Darryl Sutter ended that streak in 2003–04 when he coached the Flames to a marked improvement over their previous season, ending with a trip to the 2004 Stanley Cup Finals. Though he did not win, Sutter earned a nomination for the Jack Adams Award as the league's top coach as a result of the team's performance. Bob Hartley became the next head coach and won the 2015 Jack Adams Award. He was fired after the 2015-16 season. The current head coach of the Flames is Bill Peters.

List of Detroit Red Wings head coaches

The Detroit Red Wings are a professional ice hockey team based in Detroit, Michigan. They are members of the Atlantic Division in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL) and are one of the Original Six teams of the league. There have been 27 head coaches in franchise history; three during the era of the Detroit Cougars (1926–1930) and Detroit Falcons (1930–1932) and the rest under the Detroit Red Wings (1932–present). Six Red Wings coaches have been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame as players: Jack Adams, Sid Abel, Bill Gadsby, Marcel Pronovost, Ted Lindsay, and Brad Park, while two others as builders: Tommy Ivan and Scotty Bowman. Adams, Bowman, Ivan, and Lindsay have also won the Lester Patrick Trophy, an award presented to those who have provided an outstanding service to hockey in the United States.

Barry Smith has the highest winning percentage of any Red Wings coach, with an .800 record from the five games he coached on an interim basis with Dave Lewis during the 1998 season. He is followed by Lewis who has a .672 winning percentage. Larry Wilson, who coached the 1977 season, has the lowest winning percentage (.139). Jack Adams coached the most games of any Red Wings head coach, 964 games during his tenure with the Cougars, Falcons and Red Wings. Adams also has the most regular season losses and ties. The Jack Adams Award, awarded annually to the National Hockey League head coach "adjudged to have contributed the most to his team's success", is named after him. Mike Babcock has the most regular season wins. Jacques Demers is the only NHL coach to have won the Jack Adams Award twice with the same team. Scotty Bowman also won twice, though with different teams: the first time, he was coach of the Montreal Canadiens. The current head coach of the Red Wings is Jeff Blashill, hired in June 2015 following the departure of Babcock to the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Marc Crawford

Marc Joseph John Crawford (born February 13, 1961) is a Canadian professional ice hockey coach who serves as the interim head coach of the Ottawa Senators of the National Hockey League (NHL). He previously won the Stanley Cup in 1996 while coaching the Colorado Avalanche. Crawford is also a former professional ice hockey forward who played for the Vancouver Canucks.

Mike Babcock

Michael Babcock Jr. (born April 29, 1963) is a Canadian professional ice hockey head coach, currently serving as head coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs of the National Hockey League (NHL). He previously spent 10 seasons as head coach of the Detroit Red Wings, winning the Stanley Cup with them in 2008 and helping them to the Stanley Cup Playoffs every year during his tenure. He holds the record as the coach with the most wins in Red Wings history, surpassing that of Jack Adams. He has also served as head coach of the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, whom he helped to the 2003 Stanley Cup Finals.

Babcock was born in Manitouwadge, Ontario and grew up in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. As of April 2019, he is the only coach to gain entry to the Triple Gold Club, having guided the Red Wings to the Stanley Cup in 2008, as well as leading Team Canada to gold at the IIHF Ice Hockey World Championships in 2004, the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver and the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. Babcock is the only coach to win six distinct national or international titles, guiding Canada to gold at the 2016 World Cup of Hockey and the IIHF World Junior Championships in 1997 and the University of Lethbridge to the CIS University Cup in 1994.

Mike Keenan

Michael Edward Keenan (born October 21, 1949) is a Canadian professional hockey coach who most recently coached the Kunlun Red Star of the Kontinental Hockey League. Previously, he served as head coach and/or general manager with several NHL teams between 1984 and 2009. He has also worked as an analyst for the New York Rangers on MSG Network and as a hockey analyst for NBC Sports Network.

Keenan won a Stanley Cup championship as coach of the New York Rangers in 1994. He also won the Gagarin Cup while coaching Metallurg Magnitogorsk in 2014.

Pat Burns

Patrick John Joseph Burns (April 4, 1952 – November 19, 2010) was a National Hockey League head coach. Over 14 seasons between 1988 and 2004, he coached in 1,019 games with the Montreal Canadiens, Toronto Maple Leafs, Boston Bruins, and New Jersey Devils. Burns retired in 2005 after being diagnosed with recurring cancer, which eventually claimed his life five years later.

In 2014, he was posthumously inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Paul MacLean (ice hockey)

Paul A. MacLean (born March 9, 1958) is a French-born Canadian professional ice hockey coach and former player. He most recently served as an assistant coach for the Anaheim Ducks until his departure from the team on June 1, 2017. He played 11 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) with the St. Louis Blues, Detroit Red Wings and the original Winnipeg Jets. He is the former head coach of the NHL's Ottawa Senators, winning the 2013 Jack Adams Award as the NHL's Coach of the Year.

Scotty Bowman

William Scott Bowman, OC (born September 18, 1933) is a Canadian retired National Hockey League (NHL) head coach. He holds the record for most wins in league history, with 1,244 wins in the regular season and 223 in the Stanley Cup playoffs and ranks 2nd all time (behind Jean Béliveau's seventeen) for most Stanley Cup victories by a player, coach or executive with fourteen. He coached the St. Louis Blues, Montreal Canadiens, Buffalo Sabres, Pittsburgh Penguins, and Detroit Red Wings. He is currently the Senior Advisor of Hockey Operations for the Chicago Blackhawks (his son, Stan, is the team's general manager). Bowman is regarded as one of the greatest coaches in NHL history.As head coach, Bowman has won a record nine Stanley Cup championships; five with the Canadiens (1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, and 1979), one with the Penguins (1992) and three with the Red Wings (1997, 1998, and 2002). He has also won five Stanley Cups as a member of an organization's front office. He was director of player development for the 1991 Penguins, Consultant with the 2008 Detroit Red Wings, and Senior Advisor of Hockey Operations for the 2010, 2013, and 2015 Chicago Blackhawks. Bowman is the only NHL coach to lead three teams to Stanley Cup victories. Bowman won the Jack Adams Award in 1977 and 1996. In the 1976–77 season he won a record 60 games, breaking his own record of 58 wins the year before. He broke his own record again in the 1995–1996 season, with 62 wins. His 8 losses in 1976–77 are a modern record. His teams also made it to the Stanley Cup Finals a record 13 times and the semi-finals a record 16 times.

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