J. T. Snow

Jack Thomas Snow Jr. (born February 26, 1968) is a former Major League Baseball player. He played all but two games in his career as a first baseman, and played nine of his 13½ seasons with the San Francisco Giants. He was known for his exceptional defense. After his retirement as a player, Snow worked in radio and television broadcasting. He has also worked as a special assistant to the general manager for the Giants.[1]

J. T. Snow
J. T. Snow (cropped)
Snow with the San Francisco Giants
First baseman
Born: February 26, 1968 (age 51)
Long Beach, California
Batted: Switch Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 20, 1992, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 27, 2008, for the San Francisco Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.268
Home runs189
Runs batted in877
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Snow is the son of former NFL Los Angeles Rams Pro Bowl wide receiver Jack Snow and Merry Carole Shane, who died in 1998 from thyroid cancer. He has two sisters, Michelle and Stephanie.[2]

His father, Jack, worked with JT at first base, throwing balls from shortshop purposely in the dirt to teach his son the trade of digging balls out of the dirt.

Los Alamitos High School

Snow attended Los Alamitos High School in Los Alamitos, California and was awarded All-Orange County honors in baseball, football, and basketball. He played safety his junior year (1984) and quarterback his senior year (1985) on the varsity football team. Receiver Rob Katzaroff set an Orange County record with 93 single-season receptions (a record which still stands after the 2017 season) while Snow played quarterback. On the basketball team, Snow played point guard. On the baseball team, Snow played with future Giants reliever Robb Nen and future UCLA Bruins outfielder Katzaroff. All three Griffin baseball players from the 1985 season were eventually drafted to play minor league baseball.

University of Arizona

After high school, Snow played three seasons at the University of Arizona, where his teammates included Kenny Lofton, Alan Zinter, Scott Erickson, Trevor Hoffman, and Kevin Long.[3]

Professional career

Snow was drafted by the New York Yankees in the fifth round of the 1989 baseball amateur draft.[2] He broke into the Majors with the Yankees at the end of the 1992 season.

California Angels (1993–96)

Traded to the California Angels that year as part of the Jim Abbott deal, Snow played for them from 1993 to 1996, where he won his first two of what would be six career Gold Gloves.

San Francisco Giants (1997–2005)

Snow was traded to the Giants after the 1996 season for left-handed pitcher Allen Watson and minor league pitcher Fausto Macey.[4]

While a switch-hitter earlier in his career, Snow batted exclusively left-handed after 1998. In 2000, he led the league in sacrifice flies with 14. After a two-year injury-riddled stretch from 2002 to 2003 where his batting average was .246, Snow rebounded in 2004 with a .327 average, hitting .387 after the All-Star break (which ranked second only to Ichiro Suzuki in the Major Leagues).

Four memorable moments with the Giants

On June 26, 1999, Snow tagged out Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Carlos Pérez using the "hidden ball trick", the last successful execution of the play in the 20th century.[5]

In the 2000 National League Division Series against the New York Mets, with the Giants trailing 4–1 in the bottom of the ninth, Snow hit a three-run pinch-hit homer against Mets reliever Armando Benítez. However, the Giants failed to capitalize on their momentum, eventually falling in the 10th inning and going on to lose the series.

In the 2002 World Series, Snow was scoring a run in Game 5 off a Kenny Lofton triple and lifted 3-year-old Darren Baker, the Giants' batboy and son of then Giants’ manager Dusty Baker, by the jacket as he was crossing home plate. Darren had run out to collect Lofton's bat before the play was completed. This turned into a touching and memorable incident, but easily could have resulted in disaster with a small child wandering into the path of Snow and David Bell as they both barreled home to score. Following the incident with Darren Baker, Major League Baseball required batboys and girls to be at least 14 years of age.[6] A photograph of this incident now hangs in the Baseball Hall of Fame, in Cooperstown, New York.

In the 2003 National League Division Series against the Florida Marlins, with the Giants trailing 7–6 in Game 4 in the ninth inning, he attempted to score from second base on a single to left field, but Jeff Conine's throw to the plate came in time as catcher Ivan Rodriguez tagged Snow at the plate as Snow barreled into him, ending the game and the series. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, it was the first postseason series to end with the potential tying run thrown out at the plate.

Boston Red Sox (2006)

Snow's tenure with the Giants effectively ended when the team declined to offer him salary arbitration before the 2006 season. He signed a one-year, $2 million contract with the Boston Red Sox on January 6, 2006. After his father's death in 2006, Snow wore his father's number 84 in his honor.[7] He served primarily in a platoon with Kevin Youkilis at first base until he requested to be designated for assignment due to a lack of playing time. He was granted his designation June 19, and was officially released eight days later.

Retirement

At the end of the 2006 season, Snow retired from baseball and began working as a color commentator on Giants radio broadcasts alongside play-by-play announcer Dave Flemming. He has also served as an advisor to the Giants' general manager, Brian Sabean, and as a roving minor league instructor for the Giants.[1] Since 2013, he has worked as a college baseball broadcaster for Pac-12 Network.[8]

When he returned for a visit to AT&T Park at the end of the 2006 season, Snow received a standing ovation when he was featured on the Jumbotron.

2008

On September 24, 2008, the Giants signed Snow to a one-day contract to allow him to retire as a Giant. However, rather than immediately retiring after signing the symbolic contract and receiving no actual pay as is usually done, Snow was penciled into the starting lineup and took the field on September 27 against the Dodgers, but was replaced before the first pitch. It was a move that allowed Snow to officially take the field as a Giants player one last time. Eugenio Vélez, Omar Vizquel, and Rich Aurilia threw balls in the dirt to mess with Snow during fielding practice prior to the first pitch, but Snow still made the plays. For his brief official appearance, he received the prorated league minimum salary of $2,100.[9]

References

  1. ^ a b "San Francisco Giants: Front Office". sanfrancisco.giants.mlb.com. Archived from the original on October 17, 2014. Retrieved October 17, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "About the Snowmen". The Snow Foundation. 2017. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  3. ^ Shpigel, Ben (October 7, 2010). "As Yankees' Most Valuable Repairman, Long Revives Struggling Hitters". The New York Times. p. B17. Archived from the original on March 1, 2011.
  4. ^ DiGiovanna, Mike (November 28, 1996). "Angels Trade J.T. Snow to Giants". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  5. ^ Berthiaume, Michelle (2012). "The Rare Sightings of the Infamous Hidden-Ball Trick". The Equinox. Keene State College. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  6. ^ "MLB sets minimum age of 14 for batboys". Sports Illustrated. January 16, 2003. Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  7. ^ DiMeglio, Steve (March 7, 2006). "Snow prepared to carry dad's legacy on his back". USA Today. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  8. ^ "Baseball TV schedule released; former Pac-12 stars Snow, Stocker join Pac-12 Networks as analysts". Pac-12.com (Press release). February 5, 2013.
  9. ^ Baggarly, Andrew (September 24, 2009). "J.T. Snow will take field one more time as a Giant". Bay Area News Group.

External links

1989 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1989 season was the 87th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 74-87, finishing in fifth place, 14.5 games behind the Toronto Blue Jays. New York was managed by Dallas Green and Bucky Dent. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1992 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1992 season was the 90th season for the Yankees and their first under manager Buck Showalter. The team looked to improve their standings from 1991 when they finished fifth in the American League Eastern Division with a 71-91 record.

The Yankees did improve their record by five games and finished tied for fourth place with the Cleveland Indians at 76-86, twenty games behind the eventual world champion Toronto Blue Jays. The team finished with a losing record for the fourth consecutive year, with 86 the fewest losses in that span. This was the last season, to date, that the Yankees finished with a losing record.

The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1993 California Angels season

The California Angels 1993 season involved the Angels finishing 5th in the American League west with a record of 71 wins and 91 losses.

1997 San Francisco Giants season

The 1997 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 115th season in Major League Baseball, their 40th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 38th at 3Com Park at Candlestick Point. The Giants finished in first place in the National League West with a record of 90 wins and 72 losses. They lost the National League Division Series in three games to the Florida Marlins.

1998 San Francisco Giants season

The 1998 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 116th season in Major League Baseball, their 41st season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 39th at 3Com Park at Candlestick Point. The team finished in second place in the National League West with an 89-74 record, 9½ games behind the San Diego Padres.

1999 San Francisco Giants season

The 1999 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 117th season in Major League Baseball, their 42nd season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 40th and final season at 3Com Park at Candlestick Point. The team finished in second place in the National League West with an 86-76 record, 14 games behind the Arizona Diamondbacks.

2001 San Francisco Giants season

The 2001 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 119th year in Major League Baseball, their 44th year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their second at Pacific Bell Park. The team finished in second place in the National League West with a 90–72 record, 2 games behind the Arizona Diamondbacks.

2002 National League Division Series

The 2002 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 2002 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Monday, October 7, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 101–59) vs. (4) San Francisco Giants (Wild Card, 95–66); Giants win series, 3–2.

(2) Arizona Diamondbacks (Western Division champion, 98–64) vs. (3) St. Louis Cardinals (Central Division champion, 97–65); Cardinals win series, 3–0.The higher seed (in parentheses) had the home field advantage (Games 1, 2 and 5 at home), which was determined by playing record.

The Cardinals and Giants went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Giants became the National League champion, and lost to the American League champion Anaheim Angels in the 2002 World Series.

2002 World Series

The 2002 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB)'s 2002 season. The 98th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion Anaheim Angels and the National League (NL) champion San Francisco Giants; the Angels defeated the Giants, four games to three, to win their first World Series championship. The series was played from October 19–27, 2002, at Pacific Bell Park in San Francisco and Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim.

This was the first World Series since the 1995 inception of the wild card in MLB (and the last until 2014) in which both wild card teams would vie for the title. The Angels finished the regular season in second place in the AL West division. They defeated the four-time defending AL champion New York Yankees, three games to one, in the best-of-five AL Division Series, and in doing so won their first postseason series in franchise history. They then defeated the Minnesota Twins, four games to one, in the best-of-seven AL Championship Series to advance to the World Series, another first in franchise history. The Giants finished the regular season in second place in the NL West division. They defeated the Atlanta Braves in the NL Division Series and the St. Louis Cardinals in the NL Championship Series to advance to the World Series, giving the team their 20th NL pennant and 17th appearance in the Fall Classic but only their third since moving from New York City to San Francisco in 1958.

The series was the fourth World Series played between two teams from California, after 1974, 1988, and 1989. Barry Bonds, Reggie Sanders, and J. T. Snow each hit home runs to help propel the Giants to win Game one. Game two was a high-scoring affair that the Angels ultimately won on Tim Salmon's eighth-inning home run. The Angels routed the Giants in Game three, but lost Game four on a tie-breaking eighth-inning single by the Giants' David Bell. The Giants brought the Angels to the brink of elimination by winning Game five in a blowout. The Giants were eight outs away from winning the Series in Game six, but late game home runs by Scott Spiezio and Darin Erstad, as well as a two-RBI double by Troy Glaus helped the Angels overcome a five-run, seventh-inning deficit to win. A three-run double by Garret Anderson was the difference in the Angels' Game seven win to clinch the series. Glaus was named the World Series Most Valuable Player. The two teams set a record for combined most home runs in a World Series (21), which stood until 2017.

2003 San Francisco Giants season

The 2003 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 121st year in Major League Baseball, their 46th year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their fourth at Pacific Bell Park. The Giants finished in first place in the National League West with a record of 100 wins and 61 losses. They lost the National League Division Series in four games to the Florida Marlins.

2004 San Francisco Giants season

The 2004 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 122nd year in Major League Baseball, their 47th year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their fifth at SBC Park. The team finished in second place in the National League West with a 91-71 record, 2 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers. Barry Bonds became the oldest player in the history of the National League to win the MVP Award. It would be the last winning season San Francisco would have until 2009.

2005 San Francisco Giants season

The 2005 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 123rd year in Major League Baseball, their 48th year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their sixth at SBC Park. The team finished in third place in the National League West with a 75-87 record, 7 games behind the San Diego Padres.

Jack Snow

Jack Snow may refer to:

Jack Snow (writer) (1907-1956), writer of Oz books

Jack Snow (American football) (1943-2006), American football player

J.T. Snow (Jack Thomas, born 1968), American baseball player and son of the football player

List of Gold Glove Award winners at first base

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985 and 2007), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Keith Hernandez has won the most Gold Gloves at first base, capturing 11 consecutive awards in the National League from 1978 to 1988. In the American League, Don Mattingly won nine times with the New York Yankees for the second-highest total among first basemen, and George Scott won eight awards playing for the Boston Red Sox (three) and the Milwaukee Brewers (five). Victor Pellot, who played most of his major league career under the alias "Vic Power", and Bill White each won seven awards; six-time winners include Wes Parker and J. T. Snow. Steve Garvey and Mark Grace have won four Gold Gloves at the position, as well as Mark Teixeira as of 2010. Eddie Murray is the only member of the Baseball Hall of Fame to win a Gold Glove at first base in either league.Among winners, Garvey has made the most putouts in a season, with 1,606 in 1977. Murray leads American League winners in that category, with 1,538 in 1984. Kevin Youkilis has made the fewest errors in a season, also achieving the highest fielding percentage, when he went the entire 2007 season without an error for a fielding percentage of 1.000. Several players have made one error in a winning season, including Parker in 1968, Snow in 1998, and Rafael Palmeiro in 1999. Parker and Snow achieved a .999 fielding percentage in those seasons, as did Todd Helton in 2001. The player with the most errors in an award-winning season was Scott; he made 19 errors in 1967. Hernandez made the most assists in a season, with 149 in 1986 and 1987, and turned the most double plays in the National League (147) in 1983. The highest double play total in the major leagues belongs to Cecil Cooper, who turned 160 double plays in 1980.Darin Erstad won a Gold Glove as a first baseman in 2004 after winning two awards in the outfield (2000, 2002), making him the only player to win the award as an infielder and an outfielder. In 1999, Palmeiro won the Gold Glove with the Texas Rangers while only appearing in 28 games as a first baseman; he appeared in 135 games as a designated hitter that season, resulting in some controversy over his selection.

Mark Cresse

Mark Emery Cresse (born September 21, 1951 in St. Albans, New York) is a former member of the coaching staff of the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1977–1998.

He was a catcher at Golden West College before transferring to California State University, Long Beach where he was a member of Sigma Pi fraternity. Cresse was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the third round of the 1971 MLB draft. He played three seasons of minor league baseball where he reached the Triple-A team of the Cardinals' organization.Cresse was released by the Cardinals in 1974 then tried, and failed, to join the California Angels. He was able to join the Dodgers in the 1974 season as a bullpen catcher and batting practice pitcher, which were non-roster positions. He was named bullpen coach in 1977 by Tommy Lasorda, making him one of the youngest coaches in professional baseball at the age of twenty-five.Including his time as bullpen catcher, Cresse had a 25-season run as a member of the Dodgers' coaching staff, during which time he was a trusted advisor to the Dodgers' managers. He served on five National League pennant-winners and two (1981 and 1988) World Series champions.

The Mark Cresse School of Baseball was established in 1984

His son, Brad Cresse, is a former minor league catcher.The list of past students that played Major League Baseball includes Hall of Fame catcher Mike Piazza, Jeff Kent, J.T. Snow, Craig Wilson, Michael Young, Howie Clark, Rocky Bidle, Mark Trumbo and l Hank Conger

Cresse won two World Series championships with the Dodger in 1981 and 1988.

Peninsula Oilers

The Peninsula Oilers are a college summer baseball club in the Alaska Baseball League. The Oilers are based in Kenai, Alaska, and their name refers to the Kenai Peninsula region. The team was founded in 1974 and play their home games in the 1,300-seat Coral Seymour Memorial Ballpark.

Several successful Major League Baseball players have played for the Oilers, including Cy Young Award winner Frank Viola and six-time Rawlings Gold Glove Award winner J.T. Snow, and several first-round picks including J. D. Drew.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

Willie Mac Award

The Willie Mac Award is named in honor of Willie McCovey. It has been presented annually since 1980 to the most inspirational player on the San Francisco Giants, as voted upon by Giants players, coaches, training staff, and more recently, Giants fans. McCovey personally presented the winner with the award in a pregame ceremony at AT&T Park near the conclusion of each season until his death on October 31, 2018.

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