J. J. Colledge

James Joseph Colledge (1908 – 26 April 1997)[1] was a British naval historian, author of Ships of the Royal Navy, the standard work on the fighting ships of the British Royal Navy from the 15th century to the 20th century.

He also wrote Warships of World War II with Henry Trevor Lenton, listing Royal and Commonwealth warships.

References

  1. ^ World Ship Society obituary Archived 2011-09-30 at the Wayback Machine

External links

British Warships in the Age of Sail

British Warships in the Age of Sail is a series of four books by maritime historian Rif Winfield comprising a historical reference work providing details of all recorded ships that served or were intended to serve in the Royal Navy from 1603 to 1863. Similar volumes dealing with other navies during the Age of Sail have followed from the same publisher.

Colledge

Colledge is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Brant Colledge (born 1994), Australian rules footballer

Cecilia Colledge (1920–2008), British figure skater

Daryn Colledge (born 1982), American football offensive guard

J. J. Colledge (1908–1997), British naval historian

Malcolm Colledge (1939-2015), British archaeologist who was an expert in the art of Palmyra

Richard Colledge, Australian philosopher

Thomas Richardson Colledge (1796–1879), Scottish surgeon and missionary

Danlayer

A danlayer was a type of vessel assigned to minesweeping flotillas during and immediately after World War II. They were usually small trawlers, fitted for the purpose of laying dans. A dan is a marker buoy which consists of a long pole moored to the seabed and fitted to float vertically, usually with a coded flag at the top.

Dan laying was an important part of minesweeping, and boats were fitted specifically for this purpose. The task of a danlayer was to follow the minesweepers as they worked an area, and lay the dans which defined the area swept and made it obvious where the clear channels were. This would also help the minesweepers cover areas accurately without gaps and unnecessary overlaps. A danlayer worked with a minesweeper flotilla when large areas of sea were to be clear-swept.

HMS Bangor (J00)

HMS Bangor was a Bangor-class minesweeper of the Royal Navy that served during the Second World War. She was built at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Govan, Scotland. Bangor was the lead vessel of her class and one of the diesel-engined versions. She was ordered on 12 July 1939, laid down on 19 September 1939, launched on 23 May 1940, and commissioned on 7 November 1940.

HMS Flycatcher

HMS Flycatcher was a stone frigate name for the Royal Navy's headquarters for its Mobile Naval Air Bases which supported their Fleet Air Arm units.

Flycatcher was based first at RNAS Ludham, Norfolk then moved to Middle Wallop.

On 1 April 1947 Kai Tak Airport in Hong Kong was recommissioned as HMS Flycatcher.Also, HMS FLYCATCHER, ex-Turkish motor patrol boat. Built 1912 Thornycroft. Sunk 9.11.14 by HMS ESPIEGLE in Shatt-al-Arab, salvaged, back in service late 1915. Armed with 1-6pdr/1-MG. Sold c1923.

HMS Prince Consort (1862)

HMS Prince Consort was the first ship to carry this name in the Royal Navy. Laid down as HMS Triumph, at HM Royal Dockyard, Pembroke as a 91-gun screw second-rate line-of-battle ship, she was renamed HMS Prince Consort on 14 February 1862 following the death of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, the husband of Queen Victoria.Her first posting after commissioning was to Liverpool; on her passage there, in an Irish Sea gale, it was found that she did not have enough scuppers fitted to discharge seawater coming aboard, and almost foundered. She served in the Channel Fleet from 1864 until 1867, when she was paid off to re-arm. From 1867 to 1871 she formed part of the Mediterranean Fleet, until she was brought home for a further re-armament. Notwithstanding this expense, she saw no further sea service, and by 1882 had fallen into disrepair, and was sold.

The "Prince Consort" brought passengers to Queensland (Australia) on 26 July 1862, 2 November 1862, 22 December 1863 and 30 March 1864, sailing from the English ports of Liverpool, Plymouth and Southhampton.Prince Consort was widely regarded as being the second-worst roller in the entire fleet, being exceeded in this only by HMS Lord Clyde.

HMS Tigress (1911)

HMS Tigress was an Acheron-class destroyer of the Royal Navy that served during World War I. She was built under the 1910–11 shipbuilding programme by R. W. Hawthorn Leslie & Company of Hebburn, was launched on 20 December 1911 and was sold for breaking on 9 May 1921.

Halcyon-class minesweeper

The Halcyon class was a class of 21 oil-fired minesweepers (officially, "fleet minesweeping sloops") built for the British Royal Navy between 1933 and 1939. They were given traditional small ship names used historically by the Royal Navy and served during World War II.

MV Adula

MV Adula was one of nine Royal Dutch/Shell oil tankers converted to become a Merchant Aircraft Carrier (MAC ship). The group is collectively known as the Rapana class.

MV Adula was built at Blytheswood and completed in March, 1937 as an oil tanker for the Royal Dutch/Shell line. She was converted at Falmouth to a MAC ship, entering service in February 1944.As a MAC ship, she had no aircraft hangar, and continued to carry normal cargoes, although operating under Royal Navy control. Only her air crew and the necessary maintenance staff were naval personnel.At the end of the war, Adula was reconverted to an oil tanker. She served in this capacity until broken up for scrap at Briton Ferry in May 1953.

MV Alexia

MV Alexia was one of nine Royal Dutch/Shell oil tankers converted to become a Merchant Aircraft Carrier (MAC ship). The group is collectively known as the Rapana class.

MV Alexia was built at Bremer Vulkan and completed in April, 1935 as an oil tanker for the Anglo Saxon Royal Dutch/Shell line. She sustained severe damage in two separate U-boat attacks in 1940 and 1942.

After the second attack was converted to a MAC ship, entering service in December 1943.As a MAC ship, she had no aircraft hangar, and continued to carry normal cargoes, although operating under Royal Navy control. Only her air crew and the necessary maintenance staff were naval personnel.At the end of the war, Alexia was reconverted to an oil tanker, and renamed Ianthina in 1951. She served in this capacity until broken up for scrap at Blyth in 1954.

MV Amastra

MV Amastra was one of nine Anglo-Saxon Royal Dutch/Shell oil tankers converted to become a Merchant Aircraft Carrier (MAC ship). The group is collectively known as the Rapana class.

MV Amastra was built at Lithgows and completed in March, 1935 as an oil tanker for the Royal Dutch/Shell line. She was converted at Smiths Dock, North Shields to a MAC ship, entering service in September 1943.As a MAC ship, she had no aircraft hangar, and continued to carry cargo, although operating under Royal Navy control. Only her air crew and the necessary maintenance staff were naval personnel.At the end of the war, Amastra was reconverted to an oil tanker, and in 1951 was renamed Idas. She served in this capacity until broken up for scrap at La Spezia in June 1955.

MV Ancylus

MV Ancylus was one of nine Anglo Saxon Royal Dutch/Shell oil tankers converted to become a Merchant Aircraft Carrier (MAC ship). The group is collectively known as the Rapana class.

MV Ancylus was built at Swan Hunter and completed in January, 1935 as an oil tanker for the Anglo Saxon Royal Dutch/Shell line. She was converted to a MAC ship, entering service in October, 1943.As a MAC ship, she had no aircraft hangar, and continued to carry normal cargoes, although operating under Royal Navy control. Only her air crew and the necessary maintenance staff were naval personnel.At the end of the war, Ancylus was reconverted to an oil tanker, being renamed Imbricaria in 1952. She served in this capacity until broken up for scrap at La Spezia in December 1954.

MV Empire MacAndrew

MV Empire MacAndrew was a grain ship converted to become a Merchant Aircraft Carrier or MAC ship.

MV Empire MacKendrick was built at William Denny and Brothers Dumbarton Scotland under order from the Ministry of War Transport. As a MAC ship, only her air crew and the necessary maintenance staff were naval personnel and she was operated by The Hain Steamship Company Ltd, St Ives, Cornwall.After the war, the ship was converted back to a grain carrier, and eventually scrapped in China in 1970.

MV Empire MacColl

MV Empire MacColl was an oil tanker converted to a merchant aircraft carrier (MAC) ship.

MV Empire MacColl was built by Laird, Son & Co., Birkenhead under order from the Ministry of War Transport. She entered service as a MAC ship in November 1943, however only her air crew and the necessary maintenance staff were naval personnel. She was operated by the British Tanker Company.She returned to merchant service as an oil tanker in 1946 and was eventually scrapped in Faslane in 1962.

MV Empire MacMahon

MV Empire MacMahon was an oil tanker converted to a merchant aircraft carrier or MAC ship.

MV Empire MacMahon was built by Swan Hunter, Wallsend under order from the Ministry of War Transport. She entered service as a MAC ship in December 1943; however, only her air crew and the necessary maintenance staff were naval personnel. She was operated by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co.She returned to merchant service as an oil tanker in 1946 and renamed Naninia and was eventually scrapped in Hong Kong in 1960.

MV Macoma

MV Macoma was one of nine Anglo Saxon Royal Dutch/Shell oil tankers converted to become a Merchant Aircraft Carrier (MAC ship). The group is sometimes collectively known as the Rapana Class.

Macoma was launched on 31 December 1935 at Nederlandse Scheepsbouw Mij, Amsterdam as an oil tanker and entered service the following year. She was converted to a MAC ship from late 1943 to April 1944, and commissioned 1 April 1944.As a MAC ship, she had no aircraft hangar, and continued to carry normal cargoes, although operating under Royal Navy control. Only her air crew and aviation support staff were naval personnel. In the case of the Macoma, these were provided by the Royal Netherlands Navy including the Dutch Fleet Air Arm 860 and 861 squadrons.

The Macoma and her sister MV Gadila were the first aircraft carrying vessels with a flight deck to be operated under the flag of the Netherlands.After the war, MV Macoma was reconverted and returned to merchant service as an oil tanker and served in that role until scrapped in Hong Kong in 1959.

QF 6-pounder 10 cwt gun

The British QF (quick-firing) 6-pounder 10 cwt gun was a 57 mm twin-mount light coast defence and naval gun from the 1930s to 1950s.

Ships of the Royal Navy

Ships of the Royal Navy is a naval history reference work by J. J. Colledge (1908–1997); it provides brief entries on all recorded ships in commission in the Royal Navy from the 15th century, giving location of constructions, date of launch, tonnage, specification and fate.

It was published in two volumes by Greenhill Books. Volume 1, first published in 1969, covers major ships; Volume 2, first published in 1970, covers Navy-built trawlers, drifters, tugs and requisitioned ships including Armed Merchant Cruisers.

The book is the standard single-volume reference work on ships of the Royal Navy, and Colledge's conventions and spellings of names are used by museums, libraries and archives. For more data on the ships of the pre-1863 British Navy, see British Warships in the Age of Sail.

A revised third version of the Volume 1 work was published in 2003 which added the ships of the late 20th century. The revision was conducted by Ben Warlow. A fourth edition was published in 2006, reinstating some of the smaller vessels that the third edition had omitted. A further revised fourth edition was published in 2010 to include requisitioned ships, e.g. Armed merchant cruisers, Merchant aircraft carriers, as well as small craft, e.g. landing craft and Admiralty-built trawlers.

Yarrow M-class destroyer

The Yarrow M class was a class of ten destroyers built for the Royal Navy that saw service during World War I. They were generally similar to the standard Admiralty M class, but were instead designed by the builder, Yarrow & Company. Generally, they had two instead of three shafts, as well as two funnels and a straight stern, with the bridge set well back from the forecastle. The first trio were two knots faster than the Admiralty M type, despite less installed power and one less shaft; the installed power was increased for the later vessels. Jane's Fighting Ships describes the class as "very successful boats", and all ten vessels survived throughout the war to be broken up during the 1920s. Moon, Mounsey and Musketeer were each fitted to carry a kite balloon.

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