J. J. Abrams

Jeffrey Jacob Abrams (born June 27, 1966) is an American film director, producer, screenwriter, actor, and composer. He is best known for his work in the genres of action, drama, and science fiction. Abrams wrote or produced such films as Regarding Henry (1991), Forever Young (1992), Armageddon (1998), Cloverfield (2008), Star Trek (2009), Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015), and the upcoming Star Wars: Episode IX (2019).

Abrams has created numerous television series, including Felicity (co-creator, 1998–2002), Alias (creator, 2001–2006), Lost (co-creator, 2004–2010), and Fringe (co-creator, 2008–2013). He won two Emmy Awards for LostOutstanding Directing for a Drama Series and Outstanding Drama Series.

His directorial film work includes Mission: Impossible III (2006), Star Trek (2009), Super 8 (2011), and Star Trek Into Darkness (2013). He also directed, produced and co-wrote Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015), the first film in the Star Wars sequel trilogy and his highest-grossing film, as well as the third highest-grossing film of all time. He returned to Star Wars by co-writing, producing and directing Episode IX (2019).[1]

Abrams's frequent collaborators include producer Bryan Burk, actors Greg Grunberg, Simon Pegg and Keri Russell, composer Michael Giacchino, writers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci, cinematographers Daniel Mindel and Larry Fong, and editors Maryann Brandon and Mary Jo Markey.

J. J. Abrams
J. J. Abrams by Gage Skidmore
Abrams in 2015
Born
Jeffrey Jacob Abrams

June 27, 1966 (age 52)
New York City, New York, U.S.
EducationPalisades Charter High School
Alma materSarah Lawrence College
OccupationFilm director, producer, screenwriter, composer
Years active1982–
Home townLos Angeles, California, U.S.
Spouse(s)
Katie McGrath (m. 1996)
Children3
Parent(s)Gerald W. Abrams
Carol Ann Kelvin

Early life

Abrams was born in New York City and raised in Los Angeles, the son of television producer Gerald W. Abrams (born 1939) and executive producer Carol Ann Abrams (née Kelvin; 1942–2012).[2] His sister is screenwriter Tracy Rosen.[2] He attended Palisades High School. After graduating high school, Abrams planned on going to art school rather than a traditional college, but eventually enrolled at Sarah Lawrence College, following his father's advice: "it's more important that you go off and learn what to make movies about than how to make movies."[3]

Career

Early career

Abrams's first job in the movie business started at 15 when he wrote the music for Don Dohler's 1982 horror 'B' movie, Nightbeast. During his senior year at college, he teamed with Jill Mazursky to write a feature film treatment.[4] Purchased by Touchstone Pictures, the treatment was the basis for Taking Care of Business, Abrams's first produced film, which starred Charles Grodin and James Belushi. He followed with Regarding Henry, starring Harrison Ford, and Forever Young, starring Mel Gibson. He also co-wrote with Mazursky the script for the comedy Gone Fishin' starring Joe Pesci and Danny Glover.

In 1994, he was part of the "Propellerheads" with Rob Letterman, Loren Soman, and Andy Waisler, a group of Sarah Lawrence alums experimenting with computer animation technology. They were contracted by Jeffrey Katzenberg to develop animation for the film Shrek.[5] Abrams worked on the screenplay for the 1998 film Armageddon with producer Jerry Bruckheimer and director Michael Bay. That same year, he made his first foray into television with Felicity, which ran for four seasons on The WB Network, serving as the series' co-creator (with Matt Reeves) and executive producer. He also composed its opening theme music.

2000s

J.J. Abrams by David Shankbone
Abrams at the 2010 Time 100 Gala in Manhattan

Under his production company, Bad Robot, which he founded with Bryan Burk in 2001,[6] Abrams created and executive-produced ABC's Alias and is co-creator (along with Damon Lindelof and Jeffrey Lieber) and was executive producer of Lost. As with Felicity, Abrams also composed the opening theme music for Alias and Lost. Abrams directed and wrote the two-part pilot for Lost and remained active producer for the first half of the season. Also in 2001, Abrams co-wrote and produced the horror-thriller Joy Ride.[7] In 2006, he served as executive producer of What About Brian and Six Degrees, also on ABC. He also co-wrote the teleplay for Lost's third-season premiere "A Tale of Two Cities" and the same year, he made his feature directorial debut with Mission: Impossible III, starring Tom Cruise. Abrams spoke at the TED conference in 2007.[8]

In 2008, Abrams produced the monster movie Cloverfield.[9] In 2009, he directed the science fiction film Star Trek,[10] which he produced with Lost co-creator Damon Lindelof. While it was speculated that they would be writing and producing an adaptation of Stephen King's The Dark Tower series of novels, they publicly stated in November 2009 that they were no longer looking to take on that project.[11] In 2008, Abrams co-created, executive produced, and co-wrote (along with Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman) the FOX science fiction series Fringe, for which he also composed the theme music. He was featured in the 2009 MTV Movie Awards 1980s-style digital short "Cool Guys Don't Look at Explosions", with Andy Samberg and Will Ferrell, in which he plays a keyboard solo. NBC picked up Abrams's Undercovers as its first new drama series for the 2010–11 season.[12] However, it was subsequently cancelled by the network in November 2010.

In 2008, it was reported that Abrams purchased the rights to a New York Times article "Mystery on Fifth Avenue" about the renovation of an 8.5 million dollar co-op, a division of property originally owned by E. F. Hutton & Co. and Marjorie Merriweather Post, for six figures and was developing a film titled Mystery on Fifth Avenue, with Paramount Pictures and Bad Robot Productions,[13] and comedy writers Maya Forbes and Wally Wolodarsky to write the adaptation. According to the article, a wealthy couple Steven B. Klinsky and Maureen Sherry purchased the apartment in 2003 and live there with their four children. Soon after purchasing the apartment, they hired young architectural designer Eric Clough, who devised an elaborately clever "scavenger hunt" built into the apartment that involved dozens of historical figures, a fictional book and a soundtrack, woven throughout the apartment in puzzles, riddles, secret panels, compartments, and hidden codes, without the couple's knowledge. The family didn't discover the embedded mystery until months after moving into the apartment.[14][15] After Abrams purchased the article, Clough left him an encrypted message in the wall tiles of a Christian Louboutin shoe store he designed in West Hollywood.[16]

2010s

He wrote and directed the Paramount science fiction thriller Super 8, starring Joel Courtney and Elle Fanning, while co-producing with Steven Spielberg and Bryan Burk; it was released on June 10, 2011.[17] Abrams directed the sequel to Star Trek, Star Trek Into Darkness, released in May 2013.[18] The film ended being considered less original than it's predecessor and more of a loose remake of Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan.[19] Despite critics reacting positively towards the film, the director of Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan from which Into Darkness borowed lines and plot elements, revealed in 2018, to have been disappointed with the film. He was quoted saying: "In my sort of artistic worldview, if you’re going to do an homage, you have to add something. You have to put another layer on it, and they didn’t. Just by putting the same words in different characters’ mouths didn't add up to anything, and if you have someone dying in one scene and sort of being resurrected immediately after there's no real drama going on. It just becomes a gimmick or gimmicky, and that's what I found it to be ultimately."[20]

Abrams announced at the 2013 D.I.C.E. Summit that Bad Robot Productions had made a deal with Valve Corporation to produce a film based on either the video game title Portal or Half-Life.[21] On September 9, 2013, it was announced that Abrams would release a novel, S., written by Doug Dorst. The book was released on October 29, 2013.[22]

On January 25, 2013, The Walt Disney Studios and Lucasfilm officially announced Abrams as director and producer of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, the seventh entry in the Star Wars film saga, which is a rival saga to Star Trek for which Abrams previously directed.[23] Disney/Lucasfilm also announced that Bryan Burk and Bad Robot Productions would produce the feature.[24] Following the news that he would direct The Force Awakens, speculation arose as to Abrams's future with Paramount Pictures, with whom he had released all of his previously directed feature work, and which had a first-look deal with his Bad Robot Productions. Paramount vice-chairman Rob Moore stated that Abrams will continue to have a hand in the Star Trek and Mission: Impossible franchises going forward.[25] Abrams directed, produced, and co-wrote the screenplay for, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, working alongside Lawrence Kasdan, following the departure of co-writer Michael Arndt.[26] Star Wars: The Force Awakens opened in theaters on December 18, 2015. It grossed over $2 billion at the box office, making him the second director to make a $2 billion movie since James Cameron's Avatar.[27][28] Thefilm was considered too similar to the 1977 original Star Wars]] film, with many critics considering it a remake that is also a sequel.[29][30] Despite the strong box office, and acceptance from the critics. The reaction of creator of Star Wars, George Lucas, towards J. J. Abrams's Star Wars was similar to the one Nicholas Meyer would later express towards J. J. Abrams's Star Trek sequel, Lucas found himself agreeing with the critics who perceived The Force Awakens as too derivative of the original Star Wars trilogy, particularly the original film. During an interview with talk show host and journalist Charlie Rose that aired on December 24, 2015, Lucas likened his decision to sell Lucasfilm to Disney to a divorce, and outlined the creative differences between him and the producers of The Force Awakens. Lucas described the previous six Star Wars films as his "children" and defended his vision for them, while criticizing The Force Awakens for having a "retro feel", saying: "I worked very hard to make them completely different, with different planets, with different spaceships – you know, to make it new." Lucas also likened Disney to "white slavers", which drew some criticism. He subsequently apologized for his remark.[31][32] In 2017, Lucas described the sequel The Last Jedi, as "beautifully made", shortly after its release. The comment was interpreted as Lucas liking the film more than The Force Awakens, even if Lucas was never quoted as explicitly saying as much.[33][34] The previous year, the Disney-produced Star Wars anthology film Rogue One had been released, and it was reported that Lucas also liked it more than The Force Awakens.[35]

He served as a producer on the 2016 sci-fi sequel Star Trek Beyond.

Abrams produced The Cloverfield Paradox, a sequel to 10 Cloverfield Lane. It was released on Netflix in February 2018.[36][37] Abrams also returned to produce a sixth Mission: Impossible film, alongside Tom Cruise, Don Granger, David Ellison, and Dana Goldberg. The film, titled Mission: Impossible – Fallout, was released in July 2018.[38] Also that year, Abrams produced Overlord, a horror film set behind German enemy lines in World War II and directed by Julius Avery.[39]

Upcoming projects

In July 2016, Abrams reported that a fourth alternate universe Star Trek installment was in the works and that he is confident that Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto and Chris Hemsworth will return for the sequel.[40][41]

In September 2017, it was announced by Lucasfilm president, Kathleen Kennedy, that Abrams would be returning to Star Wars to direct and co-write the upcoming Episode IX with co-writer Chris Terrio.[42]

In February 2018, HBO ordered Abrams sci-fi drama Demimonde to series.[43]

In May 2018, Abrams and Avery had reunited to produce and direct, respectively, a superhero thriller film titled The Heavy, with a script written by Daniel Casey. Paramount and Bad Robot plan to begin filming sometime in 2018.[44]

Unrealized projects

In 1989, Abrams met Steven Spielberg at a film festival, where Spielberg spoke about a possible Who Framed Roger Rabbit sequel, with Abrams as a possible writer and with Robert Zemeckis as producer.[45] Nothing came up from this project, although Abrams has some storyboards for a Roger Rabbit short.[45]

In July 2002, Abrams wrote a script for a possible fifth Superman film entitled Superman: Flyby.[46] Brett Ratner and McG entered into talks to direct,[47] although Abrams tried to get the chance to direct his own script.[48] However, the project was finally cancelled in 2004 and instead Superman Returns was released in 2006.

In November 2009, it was reported that Abrams and Bad Robot Productions were producing, along with Cartoon Network Movies, Warner Bros., Frederator Films and Paramount Pictures, a film adaptation of Samurai Jack.[49] However, in June 2012, series creator Genndy Tartakovsky stated that the production of the film was scrapped after Abrams' departure from the project to direct Star Trek.[50] For this and other reasons, Tartakovsky decided to make a new season instead of a feature film. Also in 2009, it was reported that Abrams and Bad Robot Productions would produce a film based on the Micronauts toy line.[51][52] However, a film has never gone into production.[53]

In January 2014, during the promotion of the TV series Believe, it was reported that Abrams was interested in making film adaptations of Alias, Lost and Felicity. However, no films based on these series have been developed.[54]

Personal life

Abrams is married to public relations executive Katie McGrath and has three children.[4][55] He resides in Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, California.[56][57] He is Jewish and his wife is Roman Catholic, and he sometimes takes his children to religious services on Jewish holidays.[58]

Abrams serves on the Creative Council of Represent.Us, a nonpartisan anti-corruption organization.[59]

Filmography

Film

Year Title Credited as Role Notes
Director Writer Producer Composer Other
1982 Nightbeast No No No Yes Sound effects
1990 Taking Care of Business No Yes No No No Co-writer with Jill Mazursky
1991 Regarding Henry No Yes Co-producer No Actor Delivery Boy
1992 Forever Young No Yes Executive No No
1993 Six Degrees of Separation No No No No Actor Doug
1996 The Pallbearer No No Yes No No
Diabolique No No No No Actor Video Photographer #2
1997 Gone Fishin' No Yes No No No Co-writer with Jill Mazursky
1998 Armageddon No Yes No No No Co-screenwriter with Jonathan Hensleigh
1999 The Suburbans No No Yes No Actor Rock Journalist
2001 Joy Ride No Yes Yes No No
2006 Mission: Impossible III Yes Yes No No Digital artist Directorial debut;
Co-writer with Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci
2008 Cloverfield No No Yes No No
2009 Star Trek Yes No Yes No No
2010 Morning Glory No No Yes No No
2011 Super 8 Yes Yes Yes No No
Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol No No Yes No No
2013 Star Trek Into Darkness Yes No Yes No No
2014 Infinitely Polar Bear No No Executive No No
2015 Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation No No Yes No No
Star Wars: The Force Awakens Yes Yes Yes No Actor Vocal cameo Co-writer with Lawrence Kasdan and Michael Arndt
2016 10 Cloverfield Lane No No Yes No No
Star Trek Beyond No No Yes No No
2017 The Disaster Artist No No No No Actor Himself
Star Wars: The Last Jedi No No Executive No No
2018 The Cloverfield Paradox No No Yes No No
Mission: Impossible – Fallout No No Yes No No
Overlord No No Yes No No
2019 Star Wars: Episode IX[60] Yes Yes Yes No No Filming

Television

Year Title Credited as Role Notes
Director Writer Executive Producer Composer Other
1998–2002 Felicity Yes Yes Yes Yes No Co-creator; writer (17 episodes), director (2 episodes), theme music co-composer
2001–2006 Alias Yes Yes Yes Yes No Creator; writer (13 episodes), director (3 episodes), theme music composer
2004–2010 Lost Yes Yes Yes Yes No Co-creator; writer (3 episodes), director (2 episodes), theme music composer
2006–2007 What About Brian No No Yes No No
Six Degrees No No Yes No No
2006 Jimmy Kimmel Live! Yes No No No No Episode: "4.269"
2007 The Office Yes No No No No Episode: "Cocktails"
2008–2013 Fringe No Yes Yes Yes No Co-creator; writer (6 episodes), theme music composer
2010 Undercovers Yes Yes Yes Yes No Co-creator; writer (3 episodes), director (1 episode), theme music composer
2011–2016 Person of Interest No No Yes Yes No Theme music composer
2012 Alcatraz No No Yes Yes No Theme music composer
Family Guy No No No No Actor Himself (voice) Episode: "Ratings Guy"
2012–2014 Revolution No No Yes Yes No Theme music composer
2013–2014 Almost Human No No Yes Yes No Theme music composer
2014 Believe No No Yes No No
2016 11.22.63 No No Yes No No Limited series[61]
Roadies No No Yes No No
2016–present Westworld No No Yes No No
2017 Nightcap No No No No Actor Himself Episode: "The Show Might Go on, Part 2"
Tour de Pharmacy No No No No Actor Himself Television film
2018–present Castle Rock No No Yes No No

Theatre

Year Title Credited as Notes
Director Writer Producer Composer
2017 The Play That Goes Wrong No No Yes No Broadway version

Awards and nominations

Year Award Category Nominated work Result
1999 Razzie Award Worst Screenplay Armageddon Nominated
2002 Emmy Award[62] Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series Alias Nominated
2004 PGA Award Best Drama Nominated
2005 ASCAP Film and Television Music Awards Top TV Series Lost Won
Directors Guild of America Best Director Nominated
Emmy Award[62] Outstanding Directing for a Drama SeriesPilot Won
Outstanding Drama Series[62] Won
Outstanding Writing for a Drama SeriesPilot[62] Nominated
2006 ASCAP Film and Television Music Awards Top TV Series Won
PGA Award Best Drama Won
Writers Guild of America[63] Dramatic Series Won
2007 Saturn Award Best Director Mission: Impossible III Nominated
BAFTA Award Best International Lost Nominated
PGA Award Best Drama Nominated
Writers Guild of America Dramatic Series Nominated
2008 Emmy Award Outstanding Drama Series Nominated
2009 Emmy Award Outstanding Drama Series Nominated
Writers Guild of America Long Form Fringe Nominated
New Series Nominated
Scream Awards Best Director Star Trek Won
2010 Saturn Award Best Director Nominated
Empire Awards Best Director Nominated
PGA Award Theatrical Motion Picture Nominated
SFX Awards Best Director Won
Hugo Awards Best Dramatic Presentation - Long Form Nominated
Emmy Award[62] Outstanding Drama Series Lost Nominated
2011 Scream Award Best Director Super 8 Nominated
Best Scream-Play Won
BAM Awards Best Director Nominated
Best Screenplay Won
2012 Saturn Award Best Director Won
Best Writing Nominated
SFX Awards Best Director Nominated
2013 PGA Award Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television Won
2014 Saturn Award Best Director Star Trek Into Darkness Nominated
2016 Star Wars: The Force Awakens Nominated
Best Writing Won
Empire Awards Best Director Won
Best Sci-Fi/Fantasy Film Won
Best Film Nominated
Critics' Choice Movie Awards Best Picture Nominated
Jupiter Awards Best International Film Won
Hugo Awards Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form Nominated

See also

References

  1. ^ "J.J. Abrams to Direct Star Wars: Episode IX! - ComingSoon.net". September 12, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Carol Ann Abrams dies, Producer, author was mother of J.J. Abrams". Variety. June 5, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2012.
  3. ^ J.J. Abrams: On Filmmaking. BAFTA Guru. May 8, 2013.
  4. ^ a b J.J Abrams Biography Archived February 15, 2011, at WebCite
  5. ^ The Men Who Would Be King: An Almost Epic Tale of Moguls, Movies, and a Company Called DreamWorks pgs. 55–56
  6. ^ Warner, Tyrone (May 11, 2010). "J.J. Abrams not worried about writer's block on 'Fringe'". CTV. Archived from the original on July 26, 2010. Retrieved June 29, 2011.
  7. ^ Neil Daniels Abrams - A Study in Genius: The Unofficial Biography at Google Books
  8. ^ "J.J. Abrams's mystery box". TED. March 24, 2011. Archived from the original on March 24, 2011. Retrieved March 24, 2011.
  9. ^ J.J. Abrams Talks Cloverfield Sequel Archived February 15, 2011, at WebCite
  10. ^ J.J. Abrams on 'Cloverfield' Sequel, "We're Working on Something" Archived February 15, 2011, at WebCite
  11. ^ "J.J. Abrams on Star Trek and Cloverfield 2". Comingsoon.net. February 23, 2008. Archived from the original on February 25, 2008. Retrieved February 23, 2008.
  12. ^ "NBC Picks Up New J.J. Abrams Drama Series". TVGuide.com. Archived from the original on February 15, 2011.
  13. ^ Seigel, Tatiana (June 17, 2008). "Paramount, Abrams keep house". Variety. Retrieved June 17, 2008.
  14. ^ Reagan, Gillian. "J.J. Abrams to Produce NYT's Fifth Avenue Mystery". New York Observer. Archived from the original on June 24, 2008. Retrieved June 18, 2008.
  15. ^ Green, Penelope (June 12, 2008). "Mystery on Fifth Avenue". The New York Times.
  16. ^ Schwartz, John (December 6, 2010). "Monumentally Mystifying: Power of Secrets Inspires Public Art". New York Times.
  17. ^ Pamela McClintock (May 6, 2010). "Abrams, Spielberg confirmed for 'Super 8'". Variety. Archived from the original on February 15, 2011. Retrieved July 27, 2010.
  18. ^ "J.J. Abrams Will Direct STAR TREK 2". NextNewMovies. Archived from the original on April 2, 2012. Retrieved December 6, 2011.
  19. ^ https://www.flickeringmyth.com/2018/11/the-wrath-of-khan-director-wasnt-impressed-by-star-trek-into-darkness/
  20. ^ "Wrath of Khan Director Disappointed by Star Trek Into Darkness". November 25, 2018.
  21. ^ Graser, Marc (February 6, 2013). "J.J. Abrams will develop 'Half-Life,' 'Portal' games into films". Variety. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  22. ^ "Stranger". Soonyouwillknow.com. Retrieved November 25, 2013.
  23. ^ "It's official: Abrams to direct new 'Star Wars' film". CNN. January 26, 2013. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  24. ^ "Star Wars Is Being Kick-Started with Dynamite J.J. Abrams to Direct Star Wars: Episode VII". StarWars.com. January 25, 2013. Archived from the original on January 10, 2016. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  25. ^ "J.J. Abrams directing 'Star Wars': What happens to 'Star Trek'?". The Los Angeles Times. January 25, 2013. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  26. ^ "J.J. Abrams to script as well as direct". Guardian UK. August 25, 2013. Retrieved October 25, 2013.
  27. ^ "'Star Wars: Episode VII' script delayed".
  28. ^ "Disney Chief Reveals 'Star Wars: VII' Casting Almost Complete, Says Film Is Already Shooting (Video)". Retrieved July 4, 2014.
  29. ^ http://whatculture.com/film/star-wars-the-force-awakens-10-ways-its-a-remake-of-a-new-hope
  30. ^ https://www.wired.com/2016/03/mapping-star-wars-force-awakens-characters/
  31. ^ Child, Ben (31 December 2015). "Attack of the moans: George Lucas hits out at 'retro' Star Wars: The Force Awakens". The Guardian. Retrieved 18 April 2016.
  32. ^ Peterson, Jeff (7 January 2016). "George Lucas elaborates on his reaction to 'The Force Awakens'". Deseret News. Retrieved 18 April 2016.
  33. ^ Dumaraog, Ana (December 12, 2017). "George Lucas Says Star Wars: The Last Jedi Was 'Beautifully Made'". ScreenRant.
  34. ^ Parker, Ryan (December 12, 2017). "George Lucas Thinks 'The Last Jedi' Was 'Beautifully Made'". The Hollywood Reporter.
  35. ^ Eddy, Cheryl (December 5, 2016). "George Lucas Likes Rogue One More Than Force Awakens, and Other Fun Facts We Learned This Weekend". io9.
  36. ^ "God Particle is Cloverfield 3". October 26, 2016.
  37. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (February 4, 2018). "Netflix's Ultimate Super Bowl Surprise: 'The Cloverfield Paradox' – Watch Trailer". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved February 4, 2018.
  38. ^ Pedersen, Erik (November 30, 2015). "Christopher McQuarrie Back To Write & Direct 'Mission: Impossible 6'".
  39. ^ "Bad Robot's D-Day Movie 'Overlord' Finds Director (EXCLUSIVE)".
  40. ^ "Is Chris Hemsworth Returning for 'Star Trek 4'? J.J. Abrams Teases Next Sequel". July 15, 2016.
  41. ^ Hipes, Patrick (July 18, 2016). "Fourth 'Star Trek' Movie A Go At Paramount; Chris Hemsworth Back As Kirk's Father".
  42. ^ Osborn, Alex (September 12, 2017). "Star Wars: Episode IX To Be Directed by J. J. Abrams". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  43. ^ http://ew.com/tv/2018/02/01/hbo-orders-j-j-abrams-sci-fi-drama-demimonde-to-series/
  44. ^ Kit, Borys (May 3, 2018). "J.J. Abrams, Paramount Plot Superhero Thriller From Overlord Director Julius Avery (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  45. ^ a b "J.J. Abrams Once Had a Pitch for Who Framed Roger Rabbit 2". March 12, 2016.
  46. ^ "Cashiers du Cinemart Issue 15:". February 16, 2008. Archived from the original on February 16, 2008.
  47. ^ Stax (September 17, 2002). "Ratner Talks Superman".
  48. ^ McNary, Michael Fleming, Dave (August 12, 2004). "Par girding up for 'War'".
  49. ^ "J.J. Abrams Producing Samurai Jack: The Movie - Film Junk".
  50. ^ "A Preview of Sony Animation's Hotel Transylvania - ComingSoon.net". June 26, 2012.
  51. ^ Schuker, Lauren A. E. (November 6, 2009). "The Cry Goes Out in Hollywood: 'Get Me Mr. Potato Head's Agent!'" – via www.wsj.com.
  52. ^ "Blogger". theplaylist.blogspot.pe.
  53. ^ "'G.I. Joe: Retaliation' Writers Offer Updates on 'Cowboy Ninja Viking,' 'Micronauts' and 'Epsilon' (Exclusive) - Movie News - Movies.com". Movies.com.
  54. ^ "Felicity Movie? Yes, Please!".
  55. ^ "EW Gets the Stories Behind Those Goofy TV Production-Company Logos", Entertainment Weekly, December 7, 2001: "The title came to creator J.J. Abrams during a writers' meeting, and he recorded his children, Henry and Gracie (ages 2 and 3), saying the words into his Powerbook's microphone. 'That day in the office while editing,' says Abrams, 'I put together sound effects on my computer, burned a QuickTime movie on a CD, gave it to postproduction, and three days later it was on national television.'"
  56. ^ "Jj Abrams, Katie McGrath 4th Annual Pink Party to... – Picture 2072721". Contactmusic.com. Retrieved November 25, 2013.
  57. ^ Director J.J. Abrams and wife, actress Katie – Media (3 of 46) Movie Premieres: 'Star Trek,' 'Angels, "Director J.J. Abrams and wife, actress Katie McGrath, parade on the red carpet as they arrives at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood for the premiere of the movie 'Star Trek' in Los Angeles on April 30, 2009.
  58. ^ Jewishjournal.com: Now It's J.J. Abrams' Turn to 'Trek', accessed December 16, 2015
  59. ^ "About | Represent.Us". End corruption. Defend the Republic. Retrieved 2016-11-01.
  60. ^ Perry, Spencer (September 5, 2017). "JJ Abrams To Direct Star Wars: Episode IX". Comingsoon.net. Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  61. ^ "Hulu Original "11.22.63" Premieres Presidents Day 2016". The Futon Critic. October 30, 2015. Retrieved November 25, 2015.
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  63. ^ "Awards Winners". Writers Guild of America. Archived from the original on January 18, 2010. Retrieved October 17, 2007.

Further reading

  • Kamp, David (Jun 2013). "What you should know about J. J. Abrams". In the Details. Vanity Fair. 634: 36.

External links

Bad Robot Productions

Bad Robot is an American film and television production company led by J. J. Abrams. Under its Bad Robot Productions division, the company is responsible for the television series Alias, Lost, Fringe, Person of Interest, Revolution and Westworld alongside the feature-length films Cloverfield, Star Trek, Super 8, Star Trek Into Darkness, Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, Star Wars Episodes VII and IX, 10 Cloverfield Lane, Star Trek Beyond, The Cloverfield Paradox, Mission: Impossible – Fallout, and Overlord.

Cocktails (The Office)

"Cocktails" is the eighteenth episode of the third season of the US version of The Office, and the show's forty-sixth episode overall. It was written by actor Paul Lieberstein and directed by Lost series creator J. J. Abrams, his first such credit for The Office. NBC hired Abrams and Joss Whedon to each direct an episode during their February sweeps week. Michael Patrick McGill, Dan Cole, Owen Daniels, and Jean Villepique guest starred.

In the episode, Michael, Dwight, Jim and Karen attend a cocktail party at CFO David Wallace's house. While there, Michael and Jan make their relationship public, Karen makes Jim uncomfortable by pointing out all of her ex-boyfriends in attendance, and Dwight inspects the home. Meanwhile, the rest of the office goes to a bar and Pam tries to be more honest with Roy.

The first American broadcast of "Cocktails" occurred on February 22, 2007 to an estimated 8.3 million viewers. The episode was positively received by television critics, with one believing it was one of the best of the season.

Demimonde (TV series)

Demimonde is an upcoming drama television series created by J. J. Abrams that is set to premiere on HBO. The series is produced by Bad Robot Productions and Warner Bros. Television with executive producers including Abrams and Ben Stephenson.

Felicity (TV series)

Felicity is an American drama television series created by J. J. Abrams and Matt Reeves and produced by Touchstone Television and Imagine Television for The WB. Brian Grazer and Ron Howard were executive producers through Imagine Entertainment.

The series revolves around the fictional college experiences of the title character, Felicity Porter (portrayed by Keri Russell), as she attends the "University of New York" (based on New York University), across the country from her home in Palo Alto, California. The show ran for four seasons from September 29, 1998, to May 22, 2002, with each season corresponding to the traditional American university divisions of freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years.

In 2007, Felicity was one of Time magazine's "All-Time 100 Best TV Shows." AOL TV named Felicity one of the "Best School Shows of All Time." In June 2010, Entertainment Weekly named Felicity Porter one of the "100 Greatest Characters of the Last 20 Years".

Joy Ride (2001 film)

Joy Ride is a 2001 American horror-thriller film directed by John Dahl and written by J. J. Abrams and Clay Tarver. The film stars Steve Zahn, Paul Walker, and Leelee Sobieski. Paul Walker stars as Lewis Thomas, a college freshman embarking on a cross-country road trip during summer break to pick up his girlfriend Venna (Leelee Sobieski). Along for the ride is Lewis' brother Fuller (Steve Zahn), a practical joker who uses the car's CB radio to play a cruel prank on a lonely trucker known only by the handle Rusty Nail. The victim of Fuller's gag turns out to be a psychotic murderer and soon the brothers are being pursued by the relentless stalker, who gets his revenge in gruesome fashion.

Lovecraft Country (TV series)

Lovecraft Country is an upcoming drama horror television series based on the novel of the same name by Matt Ruff that is set to premiere on HBO. The series is produced by Monkeypaw Productions, Bad Robot Productions, and Warner Bros. Television with executive producers including Jordan Peele, Misha Green, J. J. Abrams, and Ben Stephenson.

Overlord (2018 film)

Overlord is a 2018 American war horror film directed by Julius Avery and written by Billy Ray and Mark L. Smith. It stars Jovan Adepo, Wyatt Russell, Mathilde Ollivier, John Magaro, Gianny Taufer, Pilou Asbæk, and Bokeem Woodbine. The film was produced by J. J. Abrams, through his Bad Robot Productions banner, and Lindsey Weber. The plot follows several American soldiers who are dropped behind enemy lines the day before D-Day and discover secret Nazi experiments.

Overlord was released in the United States on November 9, 2018, by Paramount Pictures. The film received positive reviews from critics and grossed over $41 million worldwide on a budget of $38 million.

Pilot (Fringe)

The pilot episode of the television series Fringe premiered on the Fox network on September 9, 2008. The pilot was written by series creators J. J. Abrams, Alex Kurtzman, and Roberto Orci, and directed by Alex Graves. The episode introduces the character Olivia Dunham, portrayed by Anna Torv, an FBI special agent drawn into the world of applied fringe science. John Noble portrays Dr. Walter Bishop, a scientist formerly incarcerated in a mental institution for over seventeen years. Joshua Jackson plays his son, Peter, who is hired by Olivia to assist with Walter's work.

Although the pilot was set in and around Boston, filming occurred in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The episode cost $10 million to produce, making it one of the most expensive pilots in television history. The pilot was leaked online three months prior to its broadcast on television. There was speculation that it was leaked deliberately to increase interest in the program; however, this was denied by executive producer Bryan Burk. The episode was generally well received by critics, and was watched by 9.13 million American viewers on its premiere.

It is noted that the pilot is actually two episodes, running together for 81 minutes and counted as only one (episode) by the creators and fans.

Regarding Henry

Regarding Henry is a 1991 American drama film directed by Mike Nichols and written by J. J. Abrams. The film stars Harrison Ford as a New York City lawyer from a dysfunctional family who struggles to regain his memory and recover his speech and mobility after he survives a shooting, inadvertently restoring his family's integrity in the process.

The supporting cast includes Annette Bening, Mikki Allen, Bill Nunn, Rebecca Miller, Bruce Altman, and Elizabeth Wilson. The film received mixed reviews, but was nominated in 2006 by the American Film Institute for their 100 Years...100 Cheers list.

Star Trek (film)

Star Trek is a 2009 American space opera film directed by J. J. Abrams and written by Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman. It is the eleventh film in the Star Trek film franchise, and is also a reboot that features the main characters of the original Star Trek television series portrayed by a new cast, as the first in the rebooted film series. The film follows James T. Kirk (Chris Pine) and Spock (Zachary Quinto) aboard USS Enterprise as they combat Nero (Eric Bana), a Romulan from their future who threatens the United Federation of Planets. The story takes place in an alternate reality because of time travel by both Nero and the original Spock (Leonard Nimoy). The alternate timeline was created in an attempt to free the film and the franchise from established continuity constraints while simultaneously preserving original story elements.

The idea for a prequel film which would follow the Star Trek characters during their time in Starfleet Academy was discussed by series creator Gene Roddenberry in 1968. The concept resurfaced in the late 1980s, when it was postulated by Harve Bennett as a possible plotline for what would become Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, but it was rejected in favor of other projects by Roddenberry. Following the critical and commercial failure of Star Trek: Nemesis and the cancellation of the television series Star Trek: Enterprise, the franchise's executive producer Rick Berman and screenwriter Erik Jendresen wrote an unproduced film titled Star Trek: The Beginning, which would take place after Enterprise. After the separation of Viacom and CBS Corporation in 2005, former Paramount Pictures president Gail Berman convinced CBS to allow Paramount to produce a new film in the franchise. Orci and Kurtzman, both fans of Star Trek, were approached to write the film, and J. J. Abrams was approached to direct it. Kurtzman and Orci used inspiration from novels and graduate school dissertations, as well as the series itself. Principal photography commenced on November 7, 2007 and ended on March 27, 2008. The film was shot in various locations around California and Utah. Abrams wanted to avoid using bluescreen and greenscreen, opting to use sets and locations instead. Heavy secrecy surrounded the film's production and was under the fake working title Corporate Headquarters. Industrial Light & Magic used digital ships for the film, as opposed to the previous films in the franchise. Production for the film concluded by the end of 2008.

Star Trek was heavily promoted in the months preceding its release; pre-release screenings for the film premiered in select cities around the world, including Austin, Texas, Sydney, Australia, and Calgary, Alberta. It was released in the United States and Canada on May 8, 2009, to critical acclaim; critics praised its character development, as well as its storyline, effects, stunts, action sequences, direction, and its score by Michael Giacchino. Star Trek was a box office success, grossing over $385.7 million worldwide against its $150 million production budget. It was nominated for several awards, including four Academy Awards at the 82nd Academy Awards, ultimately winning Best Makeup, making it the first Star Trek film to win an Academy Award. It was followed by two sequels, Star Trek Into Darkness (2013) and Star Trek Beyond (2016).

Star Trek (film series)

The Star Trek film series is the cinematic branch of the Star Trek media franchise, which began in 1966 as a weekly television series on NBC, running for three seasons until it was canceled in 1969 because of poor ratings. Reruns of the series proved to be wildly successful in syndication during the 1970s, which persuaded the series' then-owner, Paramount Pictures, to expand the franchise.

Paramount originally began work on a Star Trek feature film in 1975 after lobbying by the creator of the franchise, Gene Roddenberry. The studio scrapped the project two years later in favor of creating a television series, Star Trek: Phase II, with the original cast. However, following the huge success of Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind in 1977, Paramount changed its mind again, halting production on the television series and adapting its pilot episode into a Star Trek feature film, Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979). Five more Star Trek feature films featuring the entire original cast followed. The cast of the Star Trek sequel series Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987-1994) starred in a further four films. Upon the release of Star Trek: Nemesis on December 13, 2002, the film had grossed $67 million, a meager amount compared to the box office of previous installments. Due to the film's poor reception and box office disappointment, the series was put on a hiatus until the franchise was rebooted with a new film, directed by J. J. Abrams and released on May 8, 2009, simply titled Star Trek, serving as a reboot to the franchise with a new cast portraying younger versions of the original series' characters. A sequel to Star Trek (2009), Star Trek Into Darkness, was released in theaters on May 16, 2013. A third film, Star Trek Beyond, was released on July 22, 2016, on the franchise's 50th anniversary.

The Star Trek films have received 15 Academy Award nominations. Star Trek (2009) won for Best Makeup in 2010, and four of the previous films were nominated mainly in the areas of makeup, music, set design and sound design.

The early Star Trek films, the first to tenth film, were originally released on VHS; competitive pricing of The Wrath of Khan's videocassette helped bolster the adoption of VHS players in households. Later films were also released on LaserDisc as well. For those films that did not receive an initial DVD release, Paramount released simple one-disc versions with no special features. Later, the first ten films were released in two-disc collector's versions, with The Motion Picture and The Wrath of Khan branded as "director's cuts", followed by later box set releases. All of the films are now available on Blu-ray, digital download, streaming media and video on demand.

Star Trek Into Darkness

Star Trek Into Darkness is a 2013 American science fiction adventure film directed by J. J. Abrams and written by Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, and Damon Lindelof. It is the twelfth installment in the Star Trek film franchise and the sequel to the 2009 film Star Trek, as the second in a rebooted film series. The film features Chris Pine reprising his role as Captain James T. Kirk, with Zachary Quinto, Simon Pegg, Karl Urban, Zoe Saldana, John Cho, Anton Yelchin, Bruce Greenwood, and Leonard Nimoy reprising their roles from the previous film. Benedict Cumberbatch, Alice Eve and Peter Weller are also credited in the film's principal cast. It was the last time Nimoy would portray the character of Spock before his death in 2015. Set in the 23rd century, Kirk and the crew of USS Enterprise are sent to the Klingon homeworld seeking former Starfleet member-turned terrorist John Harrison.

After the release of Star Trek, Abrams, Burk, Lindelof, Kurtzman, and Orci agreed to produce its sequel. Filming began in January 2012. Into Darkness's visual effects were primarily created by Industrial Light & Magic. The film was converted to 3D during its post-production stage.

Star Trek Into Darkness premiered at Event Cinemas in Sydney, Australia, on April 23, 2013, and was released on May 9 in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Europe, and Peru, with other countries following. The film was released on May 17 in the United States and Canada, opening at IMAX cinemas a day earlier. Into Darkness was a financial success and received positive reviews from critics. Its gross earnings of over $467 million worldwide have made it the highest-grossing entry in the Star Trek franchise. At the 86th Academy Awards, the film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects. It was followed by Star Trek Beyond in 2016.

Super 8 (2011 film)

Super 8 is a 2011 American science fiction film written, co-produced, and directed by J. J. Abrams and produced by Steven Spielberg. The film stars Joel Courtney, Elle Fanning, and Kyle Chandler and tells the story of a group of young teenagers who are filming their own Super 8 movie when a train derails, releasing a dangerous presence into their town. The film was shot in Weirton, West Virginia and surrounding areas, masquerading as the fictional town of Lillian, Ohio.

Super 8 was released on June 10, 2011, in conventional and IMAX theaters in the United States. The film was well received, with critics praising the film for its nostalgic elements, visual effects, musical score, and for the performances of the cast, in particular, both Fanning and newcomer Courtney's acting was cited, while also being compared to such thematically similar films as E.T., Stand by Me, and The Goonies. Super 8 was also a commercial success, grossing over $260 million against a $50 million budget. The film received several awards and nominations, primarily in technical and special effects categories, Giacchino's musical score, as well as for Courtney and Fanning's performances.

Taking Care of Business (film)

Taking Care of Business (released in the United Kingdom as Filofax) is a 1990 American comedy film directed by Arthur Hiller and starring James Belushi and Charles Grodin. It is named after the song of the same name by Randy Bachman, recorded by the Canadian rock group Bachman–Turner Overdrive (BTO). The film is also known for being the first screenplay work written by J. J. Abrams who later went on to make Super 8 and Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

The Cloverfield Paradox

The Cloverfield Paradox is a 2018 American science fiction horror film directed by Julius Onah, written by Oren Uziel and Doug Jung, and produced by J. J. Abrams's Bad Robot Productions. It is the third installment in the Cloverfield franchise, following Cloverfield (2008) and 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016). The film stars Daniel Brühl, Elizabeth Debicki, Aksel Hennie, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Chris O'Dowd, John Ortiz, David Oyelowo and Zhang Ziyi, and follows an international group of astronauts aboard a space station who, after using a particle accelerator to try to solve Earth's energy crisis, must find a way home after accidentally traveling to an alternate dimension.

The film was based on God Particle, a spec script from Oren Uziel which had the main plot of the space station crew, but was unconnected to Cloverfield. The script was acquired by Paramount Pictures and Bad Robot in 2012. It had been initially planned as part of Paramount's low-budget InSurge distribution label, but following the folding of that label, its production was expanded as a Paramount-distributed film. Only during production did Abrams decide to link the film to Cloverfield, adapting Uziel's screenplay and adding scenes to establish the connection, after the same approach was used to alter 10 Cloverfield Lane from its original script, The Cellar. Abrams saw the particle accelerator accident as a cinematic means for future events to cause changes in the past, narratively linking the Cloverfield franchise together.

Once announced as a yet-to-be-named Cloverfield film in late 2016, the film's release was delayed several times. A surprise trailer aired during Super Bowl LII on February 4, 2018, advertising the film's final title and its release on Netflix, which had purchased rights for the film from Paramount. The release occurred immediately after the game.While the unique marketing tactics were praised, the film itself received generally negative reviews from critics, who disliked the narrative, writing and editing, with many considering it the weakest of the Cloverfield films, although Mbatha-Raw's performance did receive some praise.

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