Ivy Andrews

Ivy Paul "Poison" Andrews (May 6, 1907 – November 24, 1970) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher with the New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Browns and the Cleveland Indians between 1931 and 1938. Andrews batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Dora, Alabama.

Andrews was bothered by arm ailments much of his career. He spent eight seasons in the American League with the Yankees, Red Sox, Browns and Indians, being used as both a starter and long reliever. His most productive season came in 1935 for the seventh-place Browns, when he had a 13–7 record and a 3.54 ERA (eighth in the league). In a second stint for the Yankees, he pitched ​5 23 innings of relief in Game Four of the 1937 World Series.

In 249 appearances (108 as a starter), Andrew posted a 50–59 record with 257 strikeouts and a 4.14 ERA in 1041 innings.

Andrews returned to Alabama in 1945 to become the Birmingham Barons' first pitching coach. He managed the team briefly during the 1947 season, and retired from baseball a year later. Andrews died in Birmingham, Alabama, at the age of 63. He was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.

In the latter part of his career, Andrews added a knuckleball and screwball to a pitch repertoire that consisted of a "blazing fastball", a curveball and a changeup.[1]

Ivy Andrews
Ivy Andrews
Pitcher
Born: May 6, 1907
Dora, Alabama
Died: November 24, 1970 (aged 63)
Birmingham, Alabama
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 15, 1931, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 1938, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Win–loss record50–59
Earned run average4.14
Strikeouts257
Teams
Career highlights and awards

References

  1. ^ Bill James and Rob Neyer (2004). The Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers: An Historical Compendium of Pitching, Pitchers, and Pitches. New York: Simon and Schuster. p. 120.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)

External links

1907 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1907 throughout the world.

1931 New York Yankees season

The 1931 New York Yankees season was the team's 29th season in New York and its 31st season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–59, finishing 13.5 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. This team is notable for holding the modern day Major League record for team runs scored in a season with 1,067 (6.88 per game average).

1932 Boston Red Sox season

The 1932 Boston Red Sox season was the 32nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 43 wins and 111 losses. The team set franchise records for fewest wins, most losses, and lowest winning percentage (.279) in a season—these records still stand through the end of the 2018 season.

1932 New York Yankees season

The 1932 New York Yankees season was the team's 30th season in New York, and its 32nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 107–47, winning their seventh pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by future Hall of Famer Joe McCarthy. A record nine future Hall of Famers played on the team (Earle Combs, Bill Dickey, Lou Gehrig, Lefty Gomez, Tony Lazzeri, Herb Pennock, Red Ruffing, Babe Ruth, Joe Sewell).

The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Chicago Cubs. They are the only major-league team ever to go an entire season without being shut out.

1933 Boston Red Sox season

The 1933 Boston Red Sox season was the 33rd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 63 wins and 86 losses. There were five rainouts, one against the Senators and a four game series against the Chicago White Sox that was cancelled due to the remnants of the 1933 Outer Banks hurricane, which passed to the southeast of New England the third weekend of September.

1934 St. Louis Browns season

The 1934 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 67 wins and 85 losses.

1935 St. Louis Browns season

The 1935 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 65 wins and 87 losses.

1936 St. Louis Browns season

The 1936 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 57 wins and 95 losses.

1937 Cleveland Indians season

The 1937 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 83–71, 19 games behind the New York Yankees.

1937 New York Yankees season

The 1937 New York Yankees season was their 35th season. The team finished with a record of 102–52, winning their 9th pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the New York Giants in 5 games. This gave the Yankees a 3-to-2 edge in overall series play against the Giants.

1937 saw significant changes in the layout of Yankee Stadium, as concrete bleachers were built to replace the aging wooden structure, reducing the cavernous "death valley" of left center and center considerably, although the area remained a daunting target for right-handed power hitters such as Joe DiMaggio.

1937 World Series

The 1937 World Series featured the defending champion New York Yankees and the New York Giants in a rematch of the 1936 Series. The Yankees won in five games, for their second championship in a row and their sixth in fifteen years (1923, 1927–28, 1932, 1936).

This was the Yankees' third Series win over the Giants (1923, 1936), finally giving them an overall edge in Series wins over the Giants with three Fall Classic wins to the Giants' two (after they lost the 1921 and 1922 Series to the Giants). Currently (as of 2018), the St. Louis Cardinals are the only "Classic Eight" National League (1900–1961) team to hold a Series edge over the Bronx Bombers, with three wins to the Yankees' two. The 1937 victory by the Yankees also broke a three-way tie among themselves, the Philadelphia Athletics and the Boston Red Sox for the most World Series wins all-time (five each). By the time the Athletics and Red Sox won their sixth World Series (in 1972 and 2004, respectively), the Yankees had far outpaced them in world championships with 20 in 1972 and 26 in 2004.

The 1937 Series was the first in which a team (in this case, the Yankees) did not commit a single error, handling 179 total chances (132 putouts, 47 assists) perfectly. Game 4 ended with the final World Series innings ever pitched by Hall of Famer Carl Hubbell who, during the ninth inning, gave up Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig's final Series home run.

1937 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1937 throughout the world.

1938 New York Yankees season

The 1938 New York Yankees season was their 36th season. The team finished with a record of 99–53, winning their 10th pennant, finishing 9.5 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the 1938 World Series, they beat the Chicago Cubs in 4 games. This marked the first time any team had won three consecutive World Series.

1970 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1970 throughout the world.

Boston Red Sox all-time roster

The following is a list of players, past and present, who have appeared in at least one competitive game for the Boston Red Sox American League franchise (founded in 1908), known previously as the Boston Americans (1901–07).

Players in bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

Non-US players are indicated by the appropriate flag.

Cleveland Indians all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared in at least one game for the Cleveland American League franchise known as the Blues (1901), Bronchos (1902), Naps (1903–14) and Indians (1915–present).

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

List current as of the 2015 season

Danny MacFayden

Daniel Knowles MacFayden (June 10, 1905 – August 26, 1972) was an American starting and relief pitcher in Major League Baseball. From 1926 through 1943, he played for the Boston Red Sox (1926–1932), New York Yankees (1932–1934), Cincinnati Reds (1935), Boston Braves (1935–1939, 1943), Pittsburgh Pirates (1940) and Washington Senators (1941). In a 17-season career, he posted a 132–159 record with 797 strikeouts and a 3.96 earned run average in 2706 innings pitched. His best season was 1936, when he earned 17 victories with 86 strikeouts and a 2.87 ERA, all career bests.

He batted and pitched right-handed. His best pitch was a side-arm curve ball.

MacFayden's serious demeanor won him the nickname "Deacon Danny", though New York World-Telegram sportswriter Dan Daniel, a harsh critic of his play, called him "Dismal Danny" when he was with the Yankees.

Dora, Alabama

Dora is a city in Walker County, Alabama, United States founded by Cole Smith. It initially incorporated as the town of Horse Creek on February 18, 1897, but changed its name to Dora in 1906. At the 2010 census the population was 2,025, down from 2,413 in 2000.

List of Boston Red Sox Opening Day starting pitchers

The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Boston, Massachusetts. They have played in the American League since it was founded in 1901, and the American League East since divisions were introduced in 1969. The first game of each baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, for which being named the starting pitcher is an honor. That honor is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, although there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day.

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