Ivan Tsikhan

Ivan Ryhoravich Tsikhan[4] (born 24 July 1976) is a Belarusian hammer thrower. He is a two-time world champion and an Olympic medalist.

Ivan Tsikhan
Ivan Tsikhan
Tsikhan at the 2007 World Championships
Personal information
Native nameІван Рыгоравіч Ціхан
Full nameIvan Ryhoravich Tsikhan
NationalityBelarusian
Born24 July 1976 (age 42)
Hloŭsievičy, Slonim District, Soviet Union[1]
Height1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight110 kg (243 lb)
Sport
SportAthletics
Event(s)Hammer throw
ClubDynamo Hrodna[1]
Coached bySergey Litvinov[2]
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s)84.51 m (2008)[1]
Rio silver medallists 2016 stamp of Belarus
Tsikhan (right) on a 2016 stamp of Belarus

Personal life

Tsikhan was born in the village of Hloŭsievičy, Slonim district, Grodno Region, Belarusian SSR. He now lives in Grodno. His wife Volha is also an athlete, a discus thrower. Ivan and Volha have one son, Ivan. Tsikhan was coached by the former Olympic champion Sergey Litvinov.[5]

Sport career

Tsikhan competed at his first World Championships in 1997, he reached the final but failed to record a mark. He also failed to do so at the 1998 European Championships, but finished tied for third in the final at the 2000 Olympic Games. He was ranked fourth because he did not have a superior second best.[1] He then finished sixth at the 2001 Summer Universiade and ninth at the 2002 European Championships, and competed at the 2001 World Championships without reaching the final.

The year 2003 was Tsikhan's break out season. He surpassed the 80-metre barrier for the first time. He became world champion for the first time in 2003 in Paris, with a throw of 83.03 meters. He won the 2003 Summer Universiade, and finished third at the inaugural World Athletics Final. He had a best of 84.32 metres, achieved in August in Minsk.

In 2004, At the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens Tsikhan won the silver medal with a throw of 79.81 metres, however, after retesting his doping sample in 2012 IOC disqualified him.[1][6] At the World Athletics Final he took the silver. He had a best of 84.46 metres, achieved in August in Minsk.

In 2005, at the 2005 World Championships he successfully defended his world title from Paris with a throw of 83.89 metres. In the Belarusian national championship in Brest in July, he came within one centimeter of the world record of 86.74 held by Youri Sedykh since 1986.[1][7] At the end of the season he won the World Athletics Final.

In 2006, Tsikhan won the European Championships. He also finished second at the 2006 World Athletics Final and the 2006 World Cup. His season's best throw was 81.12 metres.[8]

In 2007 Tsikhan won his third World Championships with a throw of 83.64 metres. This was his season's best. He again won the 2007 World Athletics Final.[8]

In 2008, Tsikhan had a season's best of 84.51 metres, achieved in July in Grodno. He finished third at the 2008 Olympic Games with a throw of 81.51 metres.[1][8]

In 2016, Tsikhan competed for Belarus at the 2016 Summer Olympics. He won silver with a throw of 77.79 metres.[1][9] He was the flag bearer for Belarus during the closing ceremony.[10]

Doping offense

Both Tsikhan and silver medalist and fellow Belarusian Vadim Devyatovskiy tested positive for abnormal levels of testosterone after the hammer throw finals on 12 August 2008 at the 2008 Summer Olympics. Both men were stripped of their medals by the International Olympic Committee and appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). If the Court had rejected their appeal, Tsikhan would have served a two-year suspension and been banned from the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.[11] However, In June 2010 the CAS ruled in his favor and due to discrepancies in drug testing he was reawarded his bronze medal.[3] The CAS stated that he was not cleared of suspicion, insisting the verdict "should not be interpreted as an exoneration".[12]

In May 2012, banned substances were found in Tsikhan's samples from the 2004 Summer Olympics after being retested, he was subsequently withdrawn from the 2012 Summer Games,[12] and he was later disqualified by IOC.[6]

In April 2014, Following the doping sanctions of Ivan Tsikhan which was announced in the IAAF Newsletter in March 2014, the IAAF confirmed the period of annulment for all his results from 22 August 2004 to 21 August 2006.

Personal best

  • 84.51 m (Grodno 9 July 2008)[8]

Distance progression

  • 2018 75.79 m Berlin 7 August 2018
  • 2016 80.04 m Grodno 24 June 2016
  • 2015 77.46 m Yerino 24 July 2015
  • 2012 82.81 m Brest 25 May 2012
  • 2008 84.51 m Grodno 9 July 2008[8]
  • 2007 83.63 m Osaka 27 August 2007
  • 2006 81.12 m Stuttgart 10 September 2006
  • 2004 84.46 m Minsk 7 May 2004
  • 2003 84.32 m Minsk 8 August 2003
  • 2002 79.04 m Minsk 29 June 2002
  • 2001 78.73 m Brest 8 June 2001
  • 2000 79.85 m Minsk 27 June 2000
  • 1999 70.37 m 4 September 1999
  • 1998 78.03 m Saint-Denis 4 June 1998
  • 1997 77.46 m Turku 11 July 1997
  • 1996 75.32 m Minsk 13 July 1996
  • 1995 66.84 m 1 January 1995
  • 1994 62.66 m 1 January 1994
  • 1993 61.32 m 13 July 1993
  • 1992 55.91 m 6 May 1992

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Ivan Tikhon. sports-reference.com
  2. ^ Koerner, Brendan I. (16 June 2011) "86.74 is going to stand for a long time". ESPN
  3. ^ a b Engeler, Elaine (10 June 2010). "CAS Reinstates Medals for Hammer Throwers". Seattle Times. Associated Press. Retrieved 25 May 2016.
  4. ^ Also spelled as Ivan Grigoryevich Tikhon, Belarusian: Іва́н Рыго́равіч Ці́хан, Łacinka: Ivan Ryhoravič Cichan
  5. ^ "Tsikhan's 2003 World Championships win". CNC.ca.
  6. ^ a b "IOC disqualifies four medallists from Athens 2004 following further analysis of stored samples". Olympic.org. 5 December 2012.
  7. ^ "Report of Tikhan's 86.73 throw". IAAF.org.
  8. ^ a b c d e Ivan Tsikhan. iaaf.org
  9. ^ "Men Hammer Throw – Standings". Rio 2016. Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 22 August 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  10. ^ "The Flagbearers for the Rio 2016 Closing Ceremony". 21 August 2016. Retrieved 22 August 2016.
  11. ^ "Belarusians appeal Olympic doping violations". ESPN.com. Associated Press. 6 January 2009.
  12. ^ a b "Olympics 2012 drugs: Hammer thrower withdrawn over Athens test". BBC News Online. 5 August 2012. Retrieved 5 August 2012.

External links

2003 World Championships in Athletics – Men's hammer throw

These are the official results of the Men's Hammer Throw event at the 2003 World Championships in Paris, France. There were a total number of 26 participating athletes, with the final held on Monday 25 August 2003.

2004 Summer Olympics medal table

The 2004 Summer Olympics medal table is a list of National Olympic Committees ranked by the number of medals won during the 2004 Summer Olympics, held in Athens, Greece, from 13 to 29 August 2004. A total of 10,625 athletes from 201 countries participated in these games, competing in 301 events in 28 sports. Kiribati and Timor Leste competed for the first time in these Olympic Games.Athletes from 74 countries won at least one medal, leaving 127 countries without a medal. The United States won the most gold medals (36), the most silver medals (40) and the most medals overall (101). China finished second on the International Olympic Committee medal table (though third in terms of total medals), the country's best performance until the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Russia finished third, (second in total medals), and also won the most bronze medals (38). Host nation Greece finished fifteenth, with six gold, six silver, and four bronze medals, in its best total medal haul since 1896.

Australia became the first nation to improve their gold medal total at the Games immediately after hosting a Summer Olympics.

The United Arab Emirates, Paraguay and Eritrea won their first ever Olympic medals. Israel, Chile, Dominican Republic, Georgia, Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and United Arab Emirates won their first Olympic gold medals.

2005 World Championships in Athletics – Men's hammer throw

The Men's Hammer Throw event at the 2005 World Championships in Athletics was held at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium on August 6 and August 8.

2006 European Athletics Championships – Men's hammer throw

The final of the Men's Hammer Throw event at the 2006 European Championships in Gothenburg, Sweden was held on Saturday August 12, 2006. There were a total number of 24 participating athletes. The qualifying rounds were staged three days earlier, on Wednesday August 9, with the mark set in 77.50 metres.

Ivan Tsikhan had originally won the gold medal but later tested for doping and all his results between 22 August 2004 and 21 August 2006 were annulled.

2007 World Championships in Athletics – Men's hammer throw

The Men's Hammer Throw event at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics took place on 25 August 2007 (qualification) and 27 August 2007 (final) at the Nagai Stadium in Osaka, Japan.

2009 World Championships in Athletics – Men's hammer throw

The Men's Hammer Throw event at the 2009 World Championships in Athletics was held at the Olympic Stadium on August 15 and August 17. With reigning champion Ivan Tsikhan banned from competition for doping offences, the 2008 Olympic gold and silver medallists Primož Kozmus and Krisztián Pars were the favourites in the event. Pars entered the competition with a world-leading throw of 81.43 m and an 18 competition win-streak. Belarusian Yuriy Shayunov and Russian Aleksey Zagornyi, the only other athletes to have thrown over eighty metres twice that season prior to the championships, were identified as possible podium finishers. Nicola Vizzoni, Igor Sokolov, Olli-Pekka Karjalainen, Szymon Ziółkowski, Koji Murofushi, and Libor Charfreitag were all predicted to have an outside chance of a medal.On the first day of competition, Kozmus was the first to pass the automatic qualifying mark of 77.50 m. Pars had the best effort of the day with 78.68 m, while former world champion Ziółkowski led group A with a throw of 77.89 m. Aspiring medallists Sokolov, Shayunov and Karjalainen all failed to progress to the final of the competition. On the final day of the hammer throw, the favourite Kozmus delivered a best of 80.15 m to take the gold medal, Slovenia's first ever in the World Championships. Ziółkowski's 79.30 m, the best of his season, was enough to take the silver – his first medal at a major championships since 2005. The level of the competition, however, failed to live up to expectations: the world-leader Pars started poorly and, after a number of fouls, he never regained ground and finished in fourth place. Furthermore, the performance of bronze medallist Zagornyi (78.09) was the shortest-ever distance of a medal winner in championship history.

2012 European Athletics Championships – Men's hammer throw

The men's hammer throw at the 2012 European Athletics Championships was held at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium on 28 and 30 June.

2016 European Athletics Championships – Men's hammer throw

The men's hammer throw at the 2016 European Athletics Championships took place at the Olympic Stadium on 8 and 10 July.

2018 European Athletics Championships – Men's hammer throw

The men's hammer throw at the 2018 European Athletics Championships took place at the Olympic Stadium on 6 and 7 August.

Athletics at the 2004 Summer Olympics – Men's hammer throw

The men's hammer throw competition at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens was held at the Olympic Stadium on 20–22 August.The competition had originally been won by Adrián Annus of Hungary but soon after he was found guilty of tampering with his sample at the doping control and subsequently lost his gold medal. The original runner-up Koji Murofushi was elevated to the status of 2004 Olympic champion.

Silver medal winner Ivan Tsikhan had his samples from 2004 retested in May 2012. A banned substance was found, and he withdrew from the 2012 Summer Olympics as a result, stripping of his silver medal on December 5, 2012, after drug re-testings of his sample on methandienone had been discovered positive. Tsikhan was stripped of his silver medal on 5 December 2012 after drug re-tests of their samples were found positive. No decision was taken on reallocation of medals, leaving the only medallists as Murofushi with gold and Eşref Apak of Turkey with the bronze. The athlete in a position to be elevated to the Olympic bronze medal, Vadim Devyatovskiy of Belarus, has previously been subject to a court case by the International Olympic Committee regarding doping at the 2008 Summer Olympics.

Athletics at the 2008 Summer Olympics – Men's hammer throw

The men's hammer throw at the 2008 Summer Olympics took place on August 15 (qualifications) and 17 (final) at the Beijing National Stadium.The qualifying standards for the 2008 event were 78.50 m (257 ft 7 in) (A standard) and 74.00 m (242 ft 9 in) (B standard).The original silver and bronze medalists, Vadim Devyatovskiy and Ivan Tsikhan of Belarus, were disqualified in December 2008 for testing positive for abnormal levels of testosterone. The medals were awarded to Krisztián Pars of Hungary and Koji Murofushi of Japan respectively. Tsikhan announced that he and Devyatovskiy intended to appeal the IOC's decision. In June 2010 the Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled that the disqualified Belarusians should get their original medals back due to errors at the Chinese medical lab.

Athletics at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Men's hammer throw

The men's hammer throw competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The event was held at the Olympic Stadium between 17–19 August.

Belarus at the 2004 Summer Olympics

Belarus competed at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, from 13 to 29 August 2004. This was the nation's fifth appearance at the Summer Olympics in the post-Soviet era. The Belarus Olympic Committee sent a total of 151 athletes to the Games, 82 men and 69 women, to compete in 22 sports.

The Belarusian team featured two defending Olympic champions: discus thrower Ellina Zvereva and single sculls rower Ekaterina Karsten. Along with Zvereva and Karsten, shooters Sergei Martynov, Kanstantsin Lukashyk, and Igor Basinski, and married couple Iryna Yatchenko and Igor Astapkovich competed at their fourth Olympic Games, although they first appeared as part of either the Soviet Union (Martynov and Basinski in 1988) or the Unified Team (Astapkovich, Yatchenko, Lukashyk, and Karsten in 1992). Notable Belarusian athletes featured professional tennis player Max Mirnyi, table tennis star Vladimir Samsonov, gymnast Ivan Ivankov, Russian-born judoka Anatoly Laryukov, and Greco-Roman wrestler Siarhei Lishtvan. Three-time Olympic champion and wrestling coach Alexander Medved became the nation's flag bearer in the opening ceremony.Belarus left Athens with a total of 13 Olympic medals (2 gold, 5 silver, and 6 bronze), failing only one gold short of the total achieved in Sydney. Three of these medals were awarded to the athletes in weightlifting, and two each in rowing and boxing for the first time. Five Belarusian athletes set the nation's historical record to win Olympic medals for the first time, including judoka Ihar Makarau in the men's half-heavyweight division, track cyclist Natallia Tsylinskaya in the women's time trial, and sprinter Yulia Nestsiarenka, who became the first non-American to claim the Olympic title in the women's 100 metres since 1980.Originally, Belarus had won a total of fifteen medals at these Games to match its record with Atlanta. On December 5, 2012, hammer thrower Ivan Tsikhan and discus thrower Iryna Yatchenko stripped off their silver and bronze medals respectively as being ordered by the International Olympic Committee, after drug re-testings of their samples were found positive.

Belarus at the 2016 European Athletics Championships

Belarus competed at the 2016 European Athletics Championships in Amsterdam, Netherlands, between 6 and 10 July 2016.

Belarus at the Olympics

Athletes from Belarus began their Olympic participation at the 1952 Summer Games in Helsinki, Finland as part of the Soviet Union (IOC code: URS). After the Soviet Union disbanded in 1991, Belarus, along with four of the other fourteen former Soviet republics, competed in the 1992 Winter Olympics (held in Albertville, France) as the Unified Team. Later in 1992, eleven republics joined Belarus to compete as the Unified Team at the Summer Games in Barcelona, Spain. Two years later, Belarus competed for the first time as an independent nation in the 1994 Winter Olympics, held in Lillehammer, Norway. Since 1994, Belarus has won medals at each Winter and Summer Olympics it has participated in.

Hammer throw

The hammer throw is one of the four throwing events in regular track and field competitions, along with the discus throw, shot put and javelin. The "hammer" used in this sport is not like any of the tools also called by that name. It consists of a metal ball attached by a steel wire to a grip. The size of the ball varies between men's and women's competitions (see Competition section below for details).

Hammer throw at the Olympics

The hammer throw at the Summer Olympics is one of four track and field throwing events held at the multi-sport event. The men's hammer throw has been present on the Olympic athletics programme since 1900, becoming the third Olympic throws event after the shot put and discus throw. The women's event was a much later addition, being first contested at the 2000 Olympics.

The Olympic records are 84.80 m (278 ft 2 1⁄2 in) for men, set by Sergey Litvinov in 1988, and 82.29 m (269 ft 11 3⁄4 in) for women, set by Anita Włodarczyk in 2016.

Sergey Litvinov (athlete, born 1958)

Sergey Nikolaevich Litvinov (Russian: Серге́й Никола́евич Литви́нов; 23 January 1958 – 19 February 2018) was a Russian hammer thrower and athletics coach. He competed at the 1980 Summer Olympics and the 1988 Summer Olympics, missing the 1984 Summer Olympics due to the Soviet boycott, and won a silver and a gold medal, respectively. He also won two world titles, in 1983 and 1987. After retiring from competitions he coached elite hammer throwers including Ivan Tsikhan and his son Sergey.

Turkey at the 2004 Summer Olympics

Turkey competed at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, from 13 to 29 August 2004. Turkish athletes have competed at every Summer Olympic Games since its debut in 1908. Turkey did not attend the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp, the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles at the period of Great Depression, and the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow because of the United States boycott. The Turkish Olympic Committee (Turkish: Türkiye Milli Olimpiyat Komitesi, TMOK) sent the nation's largest delegation to the Games. A total of 65 athletes, 45 men and 20 women, competed in 10 sports. There was only a single competitor in shooting and taekwondo.

The Turkish team featured two defending Olympic champions from Sydney: Greco-Roman wrestler Hamza Yerlikaya, and weightlifter and world record holder Halil Mutlu, who competed at his fourth Olympic Games as the most sophisticated athlete of the team. Among the Turkish athletes, three of them were born in the former Soviet Union (two of which were previously played for the Unified Team at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona), namely archer Natalia Nasaridze, long distance runner Ebru Kavaklıoğlu, and Belarusian-born heptathlete Anzhela Atroshchenko. Finn sailor Ali Enver Adakan, who achieved a top ten finish in Sydney four years earlier, was appointed by the committee to carry the Turkish flag in the opening ceremony.Turkey left Athens with a total of eleven Olympic medals (three golds, four silver, and four bronze), being considered its most successful Olympics with respect to the overall medal count since 1948. Nearly half of these medals were awarded to the athletes in weightlifting, including a third straight defense for Halil Mutlu in the men's bantamweight class on his final Olympic bid. Meanwhile, Eşref Apak originally claimed the bronze in men's hammer throw. On December 5, 2012, Belarus' Ivan Tsikhan stripped off his silver as being ordered by the International Olympic Committee, after drug re-testings of their samples were found positive, and in case of IOC decision to redistribute medals would upgrade Apak's spot to the silver medal position.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.