Ival Goodman

Ival Richard Goodman (July 23, 1908 – November 25, 1984) was an All-Star right fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds (1935–1942) and Chicago Cubs (1943–1944). Goodman, who batted left-handed and threw right-handed, helped lead the Reds to a National League pennant in 1939 and a World Series title in 1940, and he was elected to the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1959.

Ival Goodman
Ival Goodman Reds
Right fielder
Born: July 23, 1908
Northview, Missouri
Died: November 25, 1984 (aged 76)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 16, 1935, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
August 23, 1944, for the Chicago Cubs
MLB statistics
Batting average.281
Home runs95
Runs batted in525
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Cincinnati Reds years

The Cincinnati Reds purchased Goodman from the St. Louis Cardinals on November 3, 1934 for $25,000. The decision paid immediate dividends. In his first season in the majors, Goodman appeared in 148 games, hitting .269 with 12 home runs and 72 runs batted in. Goodman also scored 86 runs and led the league with 18 triples. He led the league again the following season with 14 triples.

Goodman remained a fixture in the Reds lineup in the following years. In 1938 he set a since-broken Reds record with 30 home runs, which was second only to Mel Ott's 36 that season, while scoring 103 runs (fourth in the NL) and driving in 92 (eighth in the NL). He was named to the NL All-Star team that season.

In the Reds' pennant-winning 1939 season, Goodman hit a career-high .323 (sixth best in the NL) and was again named to the NL All-Star team. He also hit .333 in the World Series that year, but the Reds lost to the New York Yankees in an eventual four-game sweep.

The Reds rebounded in 1940, posting 100 wins for the first time in club history and winning their first World Series title since 1919, in what would be Goodman's final season as an everyday player. He hit .258 that year with 12 home runs and 78 runs scored. He also drove in five runs in the World Series that season.

Chicago Cubs years

Goodman appeared in just 42 games in 1941 and 87 games in 1942, and on November 14, 1942, the Chicago Cubs purchased him from the Reds. He hit .320 in 80 games for the Cubs in 1943, but appeared in just 62 games the following season, which would be his last in the majors.

Goodman died on November 25, 1984 in Cincinnati.

League leader

Honors and awards

Career Statistics

Years Games PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO AVG OBP SLG FLD%
10 1107 4441 3928 609 1104 188 85 95 525 49 382 380 .281 .352 .445 .975

In the 1939 and 1940 World Series, Goodman posted a .295 batting average (13-for-44) with 8 runs scored and 6 RBI.

See also

External links

1935 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1935 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 68–85, 31½ games behind the Chicago Cubs. The highlight of the season was the first night game in Major League baseball history when the Reds behind the arm of Paul Derringer prevailed over the Philadelphia Phillies 2-1 under the lights at Crosley Field in Cincinnati.

1936 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1936 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 74–80, 18 games behind the New York Giants.

1937 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1937 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 56–98, 40 games behind the New York Giants.

1938 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1938 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 82–68, 6 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1938 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1938 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the sixth playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 6, 1938, at Crosley Field in Cincinnati, Ohio, the home of the Cincinnati Reds of the National League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 4–1.

1939 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1939 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished first in the National League, winning the pennant by 4½ games over the St. Louis Cardinals with a record of 97–57. The team went on to the 1939 World Series, which it lost in four straight games to the New York Yankees.

1939 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1939 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the seventh playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1939, at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx, New York City, the home of the New York Yankees of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 3–1.

1939 World Series

The 1939 World Series featured the three-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Cincinnati Reds, who were making their first Series appearance since winning the scandal-tainted 1919 World Series. The Yankees swept the Series in four games for the second straight year, winning their record fourth consecutive title (they would later win five straight from 1949 to 1953). Yankee manager Joe McCarthy won his fifth title, tying the record held by Philadelphia Athletics manager Connie Mack.

In the 10th inning of the final game, a famous play at the plate typified the Series. "King Kong" Charlie Keller scored when he and the ball both collided with catcher "Schnoz" Ernie Lombardi, and then Joe DiMaggio also scored while Lombardi, rolling on the ground, tried in vain to retrieve the ball. Lombardi had been smacked in the groin, but the puritanical press reported it as Lombardi "napping" at the plate.

The Yankees matched the Reds in hits with 27, but out-homered them 7 to 0 and out-scored them 20-8. Keller led the Yanks with seven hits, three home runs, six RBI, eight runs scored, a .438 average and a 1.188 slugging percentage. Both teams played sterling defense for most of the series until the ninth inning of Game 4. Up until then the Reds matched the Yankees with committing just one error for the series. But Cincinnati committed a total of three errors in the ninth and 10th innings of Game 4 which led to five unearned runs, sealing the New York sweep.

Keller broke the record for most homers by a rookie in a World Series game with two in Game 3. Also in Game 3, Junior Thompson gave up five hits in ​4 2⁄3 innings worked. Four of the five were home runs, tying the record for long balls allowed during a Series game set by the Cubs' Charlie Root in 1932.

Despite the loss, the Reds were an organization on the rise, having improved from eighth and last in the National League in 1937 (56–98, .364) to fourth in '38 (82–68, .547) and first as NL champions in '39. Ironically, despite being dominated by the Bronx Bombers in the 1939 Series, the Reds would return in 1940 to win the World Series while the Yankees finished behind Detroit and Cleveland in the AL pennant race, snapping their consecutive World Series streak at four.

At a cumulative time of seven hours and five minutes, the 1939 World Series is one of the shortest World Series in real time, and was shorter than the third game of the 2018 World Series that lasted 7 hours, 20 minutes and was 18 innings long.

1940 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1940 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball that represented the Cincinnati Reds. Cincinnati entered the season as the reigning National League champions, having been swept by the New York Yankees in the World Series. Cincinnati won 100 games for the first time in franchise history. The team went 100-53 during the season, best in MLB. The team finished first in the National League with a record of 100–53, winning the pennant by 12 games over the Brooklyn Dodgers. They went on to face the Detroit Tigers in the 1940 World Series, beating them in seven games. This was their first championship since 1919.

1941 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1941 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 88–66, 12 games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers.

1942 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1942 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 76–76, 29 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1943 Chicago Cubs season

The 1943 Chicago Cubs season was the 72nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 68th in the National League and the 28th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 74–79.

1944 Chicago Cubs season

The 1944 Chicago Cubs season was the 73rd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 69th in the National League and the 29th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 75–79.

1984 Major League Baseball season

The 1984 Major League Baseball season started with a 9-game winning streak by eventual World Series champions Detroit Tigers who started the season with 35 wins and 5 losses and never relinquished the first place lead.

Cincinnati Reds award winners and league leaders

This article is a list of baseball players who are Cincinnati Reds players that are winners of Major League Baseball awards and recognitions, Reds awards and recognitions, and/or are league leaders in various statistical areas.

Goodman (surname)

Goodman is a surname, formerly a polite term of address, used where Mister (Mr.) would be used today. Compare Goodwife. Notable people with the surname include:

Al Goodman, Ukrainian-American conductor and composer

Alan Goodman, designer for MTV

Albert Goodman, British politician

Alice Goodman, American poet

Alison Goodman, Australian writer

Allegra Goodman, American writer

Alyssa A. Goodman, American astronomer, founding director of the Harvard Initiative in Innovative Computing

Amy Goodman, American broadcast journalist and author

André Goodman, American football player

Andrew Goodman, American civil rights activist

Anthony Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Arnold Goodman, Baron Goodman, British lawyer and political adviser

Barbara Goodman, New Zealand politician

Benny Goodman, American jazz clarinetist and band leader

Billy Goodman, American baseball player with the Boston Red Sox

Bobby Goodman, American Army captive in Lebanon

Brian Goodman, American actor

Brian P. Goodman (died 2013), Canadian lawyer

Cameron Goodman, American actress

Carolyn Goodman (psychologist), American civil rights advocate

Carolyn G. Goodman, educator, Las Vegas, Nevada mayor

Charles M. Goodman, American architect

Charles "Rusty" Goodman, American singer and songwriter

Clive Goodman, British royal reporter

David Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Dic Goodman (1920–2013), Welsh poet

Dickie Goodman, composer

Dody Goodman, American actress

Don Goodman, English football player

E. Urner Goodman, leader in the Boy Scouts of America

Edmund Goodman, British football manager

Edwin A. Goodman, Canadian politician

Elinor Goodman, British journalist, formerly Political Editor of Channel 4 News

Ellen Goodman, American columnist

Felicitas Goodman, Hungarian linguist and anthropologist

Francis Adam Goodman, German-American politician

Frank Goodman, American theatre publicist

Gabriel Goodman, Dean of Westminster

Geoffrey Goodman (1922–2013), English journalist

George Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Godfrey Goodman, British Anglican bishop

Helen Goodman, British politician

Henry Goodman, British theatre actor

Irwin Goodman, Finnish singer

Ival Goodman, American baseball player for the Cincinnati Reds

Jack Goodman, American politician

James Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Jerry Goodman, American violinist

John Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Jon Goodman, British footballer

Joseph Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Julia Goodman, British portrait painter

Julian Goodman, CEO of NBC

Ken Goodman, educational researcher

Leisa Goodman, Scientologist

Len Goodman, dance judge, best known as a panel member on Strictly Come Dancing

Linda Goodman, American astrologer and poet

Lizbeth Goodman, British academic

Louise Goodman, British television presenter

Mariama Goodman, British singer

Mark Goodman, DJ and MTV VJ

Martin Goodman (disambiguation)

Morris Goodman, American scientist

Murray H. Goodman (born 1925), real estate developer

Nelson Goodman, philosopher

Norman Goodman, American politician

Oscar Goodman, American politician

Paul Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Percy Goodman, West Indian cricketer

Richard Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Rick Goodman, video game developer

Roy Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Ruth Goodman (born 1961), American romance novelist who wrote as Meagan McKinney

Ruth Goodman (historian) (born 1963), British social historian

Samuel Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Saul Goodman (disambiguation), multiple people

Scott Goodman, Australian swimmer

Shirley Goodman, American R&B singer

Steve Goodman, American folk artist

Steven M. Goodman (born 1957), American conservation biologist

Tamir Goodman, American basketball player

Vestal Goodman, American gospel singer, wife of Howard

Walter Goodman, British painter and author

William Goodman (disambiguation), multiple peopleBilly Goodman (1926–1984), baseball infielder

William Ernest Goodman (1879–1949), American cricketer

William Meigh Goodman (1847–1928), British Colonial Judge

Sir William George Toop Goodman known as W. G. T. Goodman (1872–1961), tramways engineer in South AustraliaFictional characters:

Judge Goodman, character from the Judge Dredd comics

Woody Goodman, character in the TV series Veronica Mars

Goodman Brown, protagonist in the short story Young Goodman Brown.

Goodman (NGBC), a fictional boss in Neo Geo Battle Coliseum

List of Major League Baseball annual triples leaders

In baseball, a triple is recorded when the ball is hit so that the batter is able to advance all the way to third base, scoring any runners who were already on base, with no errors by the defensive team on the play. In Major League Baseball (MLB), a player in each league is recognized for leading the league in triples. Only triples hit in a particular league count toward that league's seasonal lead.

The first triples champion in the National League was Ross Barnes; in the league's inaugural 1876 season, Barnes hit fourteen triples for the Chicago White Stockings. In 1901, the American League was established and led by two members of the Baltimore Orioles: Bill Keister and Jimmy Williams each had 21.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a right fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball or softball who plays defense in right field. Right field is the area of the outfield to the right of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the right fielder is assigned the number 9.

Harry Hooper is the all-time leader in errors committed by a right fielder with 142 career. Dave Parker is second all-time with 134 career errors at right field. Only fourteen right fielders have committed more than 100 career errors at the position.

Northview, Missouri

Northview is an unincorporated community in Webster County, Missouri, United States. It is located 6.0 miles (9.7 km) southwest of Marshfield on Missouri Supplemental Route B, 1.1 miles (1.8 km) south of Interstate 44. Northview is part of the Springfield, Missouri Metropolitan Statistical Area.

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