Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust

The Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust, formed in 1985, is a wildlife trust covering the Isles of Scilly, a group of islands off the coast of Cornwall.[1] It became the 46th member of The Wildlife Trusts in 2001 and is dedicated to ensuring that the archaeological and historical remains on the islands, as well as the flora and fauna, are protected and maintained.[2]

The Trust leases all of the uninhabited islands, islets and rocks and much of the untenanted land (including almost all the coast) on the inhabited islands from the Duchy of Cornwall for a rent of one daffodil per year.[3] The trust previously worked in conjunction with the Cornwall Wildlife Trust, and jointly produced a thrice yearly magazine called Wild Cornwall & Wild Scilly which ended in the Summer 2014 edition. Members are now sent an e-newsletter.[4]

Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust
Formation1985
TypeRegistered Charity
HeadquartersTrenoweth
Location
Chief Executive
Sarah Mason
WebsiteIsles of Scilly Wildlife Trust

Isles of Scilly Seabird Recovery Project

In 2013 the Isles of Scilly Seabird Recovery Project was set up by the Duchy of Cornwall, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), Natural England, the Isles of Scilly Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust. The five-year project aims to keep the islands of St Agnes and Gugh, brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) free, to help breeding sea birds, which lost 25% of their populations between 1983 and 2006. The rats eat eggs and kill the chicks of those birds that nest in burrows or on the ground. Rat removal began in October 2013 by a team of thirty volunteers led by Wildlife Management International Limited (WMIL) of New Zealand, and there has been no signs of rats on St Agnes and Gugh since December 2013. WMIL will return to the islands to do a final check for rats in 2016.[5]

In 2014 Manx shearwater (Puffinus puffinus) bred on both Gugh and St Agnes for the first time in living memory, and a survey of St Agnes in July 2015 found European storm petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus) at six nests. A follow-up in early September, to confirm breeding, found storm petrel chicks at each of the sites. Storm petrel also bred on Gugh in 2015.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ Gurr, Mike (2008). "A History of the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust: 1985-2006" (PDF). Wild Cornwall and Wild Scilly (107): 32. Retrieved 31 March 2015.
  2. ^ "History". The Wildlife Trusts. Retrieved 31 March 2015.
  3. ^ Duchy of Cornwall website
  4. ^ Mason, Sarah (2014). "To all our members" (PDF). Wild Cornwall and Wild Scilly (124): 37. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 September 2015. Retrieved 31 March 2015.
  5. ^ Pearson, Jaclyn (Summer 2014). "Seabird survival" (PDF). Wild Scilly. In Wild Cornwall. Truro: Cornwall Wildlife Trust (124): 35. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 September 2015. Retrieved 31 March 2015.
  6. ^ "Rare seabird makes a comeback in West Country". Natural England. Retrieved 16 September 2015.

External links

Annet, Isles of Scilly

Annet (Cornish: Anet, kittiwake) is the second largest of the fifty or so uninhabited Isles of Scilly, 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) west of St Agnes with a length of 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) and approximately 22 hectares (54 acres) in area. The low-lying island is almost divided in two by a narrow neck of land at West Porth which can, at times, be covered by waves. At the northern end of the island are the two granite carns of Annet Head and Carn Irish and three smaller carns known as the Haycocks. The rocky outcrops on the southern side of the island, such as South Carn, are smaller. Annet is a bird sanctuary and the main seabird breeding site in Scilly.The island is closed to the public from 15 April to 20 August every year to limit the disturbance to the breeding seabirds for which it has been designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). It is also within part of the Isles of Scilly Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), Isles of Scilly Heritage Coast and part of Plantlife’s, Isles of Scilly Important Plant Area The island is managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust who lease it from the Duchy of Cornwall.

Castle Down

Castle Down is a windswept plateau of maritime heath in the northern part of the island of Tresco, Isles of Scilly. The area has a number of designations including Castle Down (Tresco) Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI); is part of the Isles of Scilly Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty; part of the Isles of Scilly Heritage Coast; and part of Plantlife's Isles of Scilly Important Plant Area. There are a number of Schedule Ancient Monument's ranging in age from Bronze Age cairns (or burial places) to castles built in the 16th and 17th centuries to protect the anchorage of New Grimsby harbour.

Cornwall Wildlife Trust

The Cornwall Wildlife Trust is a charitable organisation founded in 1962 that is concerned solely with Cornwall, England.

It deals with the conservation and preservation of Cornwall's wildlife and habitats managing over 50 nature reserves covering approximately 4,300 acres (17 km2), amongst them Looe Island.

Cornwall Wildlife Trust is part of The Wildlife Trusts partnership of 47 wildlife trusts in the United Kingdom. It works in conjunction with the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust, and jointly produces a thrice yearly magazine called Wild Cornwall & Wild Scilly

The direction and work that the Trust currently does is guided by the Cornwall Biodiversity action plan. Living Seas and Living Landscapes are two such projects. The Trust runs ERCCIS (Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly), a county wide database of sightings of animals and plants. It also gives planning advice (CEC - Cornwall Environmental Consultants) to land developers.

The Trust is based at Allet near Truro in Cornwall. The headquarters and offices are adjacent to the Trust's Five Acres nature reserve. This reserve includes two ponds, as well as mixed broadleaved woodland.

Gugh

Gugh (; Cornish: Keow, meaning "hedge banks") could be described as the sixth inhabited island of the Isles of Scilly, but is usually included with St Agnes with which it is joined by a sandy tombolo known as "The Bar" when exposed at low tide. The island is only about 1 km (0.62 mi) long and about 0.5 km (0.31 mi) wide, with the highest point, Kittern Hill at 34 m (112 ft). The geology consists of Hercynian granite with shallow podzolic soils on the higher ground and deeper sandy soils on the lower ground. The former Gugh farm is just north of the neck across the middle of the island between the two hills. The two houses were designed and built in the 1920s by Charles Hamlet Cooper. The name is often mispronounced as "Goo", "Guff" or even "Gogh".

The island lies within the Isles of Scilly Heritage Coast, is in the Isles of Scilly Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust. Vegetation cover is mainly wind-pruned heath or dense bracken and bramble with a small area of coastal grassland formed over blown sand which has accumulated near the bar.

In 2013 the Isles of Scilly Seabird Recovery Project was set up by a number of organisations including the RSPB and the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust. The five-year project aims to keep the islands of St Agnes and Gugh brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) free, to help breeding sea birds, which lost 25% of their populations between 1983 and 2006. The rats eat eggs and kill the chicks of those birds that nest in burrows or on the ground. Rat removal began in October 2013 by a team of 30 volunteers led by Wildlife Management International Limited (WMIL) of New Zealand, and there has been no signs of rats on St Agnes and Gugh since December 2013. WMIL will return to the islands to do a final check for rats in 2016.

Lower Moors (St Mary's)

The Lower Moors is a wetland between Hugh Town and Old Town Bay on St Mary's, the largest island in the Isles of Scilly. The Isles of Scilly are an archipelago off the southwestern tip of the Cornish peninsula of Great Britain.

The site is owned and managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust and is within the Isles of Scilly Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. First designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in 1971 for its range of wetland habitats; it is an important feeding station for migrating and wintering birds such as common snipe (Gallinago gallinago) and water rail (Rallus aquaticus). In 2007 Cavell Smith found a great blue heron (Ardea herodias); the first confirmed record for Britain. The second British record for great blue heron also occurred on Lower Moor and, was also found by Cavell Smith!

Norrard Rocks

The Norrard (Northern) Rocks are a group of small uninhabited granite rocks in the north–western part of the Isles of Scilly, to the west of Bryher and Samson. In 1971 they were designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) for their breeding seabird colonies and they are permanently closed to landings from boat passengers. The vegetation on the islands is limited by the extreme exposure and only six species of flowering plants have been recorded.

Peninnis Head

Peninnis Head is the southernmost point of St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly. The headland is within the Isles of Scilly Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and part of the Heritage Coast. It is also a Geological Conservation Review site for its Quaternary geomorphology and was first designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in 1971 for both its biological and geological interests. On the tip of the headland is a squat lighthouse built in 1911 by Trinity House as a replacement for the 17th century lighthouse on St Agnes.The Gilstone, a prominent rock off the eastern side of Peninnis Head, should not be confused with a rock of the same name in the Western Rocks.

Porth Hellick

Porth Hellick is a tidal inlet on the south coast of St Mary’s, the largest island in the Isles of Scilly.

The bay is delineated to the south by a headland known as the Giant’s Castle, which is an Iron Age cliff fort, and Porth Hellick Down and Porth Hellick Point to the north. At low tide a wide expanse of sand and rocks are exposed and a bar of fine shingle provides a barrier from the sea to form the largest area of (usually) fresh water on St Mary’s. A stream rises in Holy Vale and flows south through Higher Moors to the sea at Porth Hellick. In its half-mile length it falls less than 25 feet and has barely cut a river bed through the marsh; but feeds the pool with fresh water.

The area is an important feeding station for migrating and wintering birds and was designated as the Higher Moors and Porth Hellick Pool (St Mary's) Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) for the ″wide diversity of habitats with several rare and notable plant species″ in 1971.

Rosevear, Isles of Scilly

Rosevear (Cornish: Ros Veur, great promontory) is the largest (0.63 hectares (1.6 acres)) of the group of rocks known as the Western Rocks, Isles of Scilly. The islands are on eastern side of the Atlantic Ocean on the south-west approaches to the island of Great Britain and are renowned for the numerous shipwrecks in the area and the nearby Bishop Rock lighthouse. All the uninhabited islands are owned by the Duchy of Cornwall and are managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust, which looks after the archaeological and historical remains on the islands, as well as the flora and fauna. Landing is not allowed on the island.

Round Island Light, Isles of Scilly

Round Island Lighthouse (Cornish: Golowji an Voth, the hump lighthouse), in the Isles of Scilly was designed by William Tregarthen Douglass for Trinity House and completed in 1887. At the time of building it was one of three lights in the Isles of Scilly, the others being the Bishop Rock and St Agnes lighthouse. The light was modernised in 1966, automated in 1987 and the island designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in 1995. It is now managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust, and except for the maintenance of the Grade 2 listed lighthouse, landing is not allowed.

St Helen's, Isles of Scilly

St Helen's (Cornish: Enys Elidius) is one of the fifty or so uninhabited islands in the archipelago of the Isles of Scilly and has an approximate area of 0.1885 square kilometres (46.6 acres). On the south side of the island is one of the earliest Christian sites in Scilly, an early medieval religious complex, which is thought to be the remains of St Elidius Hermitage, an 8th-century chapel lived in by Saint Lide, (also known as Elid or Elidius). There are also the remains of an isolation hospital used to quarantine sailors with plague. The island is the major part of a Site of Special Scientific Interest and some features have been given the designation of scheduled ancient monument. Access to the island is through chartered or private boat, although there are some season trips throughout the summer. St Helen's is currently managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust.

St Martin's, Isles of Scilly

St Martin's (Cornish: Brechiek, meaning "dappled island") is the northernmost populated island of the Isles of Scilly, England. It has an area of 237 hectares (0.92 sq mi).

St Mary's, Isles of Scilly

St Mary's (Cornish: Ennor the mainland) is the largest and most populous island of the Isles of Scilly, an archipelago off the southwest coast of Cornwall in England.

Teän

Teän ( TEE-ən; sometimes written Tean without the diaeresis) is an uninhabited island to the north of the Isles of Scilly archipelago between Tresco, 1.5 kilometres (0.9 mi) to the west and St Martin's 300 metres (330 yd) to the east.

Approximately 16 hectares (40 acres) in area the island consists of a series of granite tors with the highest point, Great Hill, rising to 40 metres (130 ft) at its eastern end. The low-lying land is overlain with glacial till and outwash gravels with glacial erratics abundant on the north coast beaches which indicates the southern limit of outwash from an ice sheet for which it is designated a Geological Conservation Review site.There is evidence of occupation from the Bronze Age to the early 19th century and the island was still being grazed in 1945. An early Christian chapel exists on the island, it was possibly dedicated to a saint called Theon.

The island lies within both the Isles of Scilly Heritage Coast and the Isles of Scilly Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust which has a Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) agreement.

Trenoweth, Isles of Scilly

Trenoweth (pronounced tre-now-eth) is a small settlement, located in the north of the island of St Mary's in the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, England.It is situated in an inland and rural part of the island, northwest of Maypole (via Watermill and Borough) and east of Telegraph (via Pungie's Lane). Also nearby, to the northeast, is Innisidgen, a prehistoric site on the coast.

The Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust are based in Trenoweth.Local industries centre on the cut flower industry, and Trenoweth has related warehousing and a shop (Trenoweth Flowers). There is also a field used for outdoor boat storage (particularly during winter). Otherwise the settlement consists of agricultural buildings and houses.

There was once a distinction between Higher Trenoweth and Lower Trenoweth, however Lower Trenoweth has become a single dwelling (named "Bristow") unconnected with (Higher) Trenoweth and no longer bears the name "Trenoweth" in its address.

Watermill Cove

Watermill Cove is on the north–west coast of St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly.

It is a historic anchorage, still used today by passing yachts and other small vessels. At Tregear's Porth, there are the remains of an old quay, with the slipway still in use for small craft.

The cove is within an Area of Outstanding Beauty, is a Geological Conservation Review site and was designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in 1996.

The 0.48-hectare (1.2-acre) site is notified for a succession of Quaternary exposures in the cliff and from sea level to the top of the cliff (oldest to youngest) the succession shows:

head deposits

organic silts and sands

head deposits of the Late Devensian with microscopic remains of plants and pollen and dated to c. 30,000 years before present. The remains indicate an Arctic tundra climate

raised beach deposits, a storm beach of the Late Ipswichian interglacial 130,000 years ago and ended about 114,000 years ago.

Western Rocks, Isles of Scilly

The Western Rocks are a group of uninhabited islands and rocks in the south–western part of the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom, and are renowned for the numerous shipwrecks in the area and the nearby Bishop Rock lighthouse. In 1971, the rocks and islands were designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest for their breeding sea birds. Landing on the islands is both difficult and discouraged and there are few published records of visits by naturalists.

White Island, Isles of Scilly

White Island (Cornish: Ar Nor, facing the mainland) is one of the larger unpopulated islands of the Isles of Scilly, part of the United Kingdom, and lies off the coast of the northernmost populated island of the group, St Martin's, to which it is joined by a tidal causeway, or isthmus. The island is designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a Geological Conservation Review site and is managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust on behalf of the Duchy of Cornwall.Access to the island can be dangerous when the rocky causeway is covered by the sea, as there are strong currents across it.This White Island should not be confused with a much smaller island of the same name, which lies off the coast of Samson.

Wingletang Down (St Agnes)

Wingletang Down is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) on the southern side of the island of St Agnes in the Isles of Scilly, England, UK, which is noted for its biological characteristics. The site is managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust and is within the Isles of Scilly Heritage Coast and the Isles of Scilly Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is the only site in Great Britain and Ireland for the small fern, least adder’s–tongue (Ophioglossum lusitanicum). As of 11 September 2009 the SSSI was considered to be in ″unconditional recovering″ condition because European gorse (Ulex europaeus) and bramble (Rubus fruticosus) are at unacceptable levels.

England
Wales
Other
Inhabited islands
Uninhabited islands
Settlements
Topics

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.