Isle of Wight Council

The Isle of Wight Council is a unitary authority covering the Isle of Wight near the South coast of England. It is currently made up of 40 seats. Since the 2017 election, the Conservatives have held a majority of 25 and appointed Cllr Dave Stewart as leader of the council.

Isle of Wight Council
Isle of Wight Council logo
Type
Type
History
Founded1 April 1995[a]
Preceded byIsle of Wight County Council
Leadership
Chair of the Council
Cllr George Cameron, Conservative
since 17th May 2019
Leader of the Council
Cllr Dave Stewart, Conservative
since 18th January 2017[1]
Chief executive
John Metcalfe
since December 2015
Structure
Seats40 councillors
Isle of Wight Council composition
Political groups
Administration
     Conservative (25)
Other Parties
     Island Independents (8)
     Liberal Democrat (2)
     Independent (2)
     Labour (1)
     Independent Green (1)
     Independent Labour (1)
Elections
First past the post
Last election
4 May 2017
Next election
6 May 2021
Meeting place
County Hall at Newport
County Hall, Newport
Website
iwight.com

History

The council was formed on 1 April 1995, replacing the Isle of Wight County Council and Medina and South Wight Borough Councils.[2]

Elections

Prior to 1998, the Liberals and then Liberal Democrats had dominated the Council. Between 1998 and 2005, it was under no overall control, ruled by a coalition of LibDems and Independents.

Elections held in June 2005 led to significant change as the Conservatives took over from the Liberal Democrats as the largest group, winning seats primarily from the Lib Dems and Independents who had previously worked together.[3]

In the 2009 elections the Conservatives managed to retain their majority by securing 24 of the revised 40 seats; however this was the only Conservative council in the UK that lost seats.[4]

In 2013, the Island Independents gained 20 seats, one short of a majority, with the Conservatives only winning 15. As of January 2015, the Island Independents have lost four councillors through defections, and the Conservatives one. Leader Cllr. Ian Stephens stood down in January 2015, the next day announcing he was to stand to be the local MP. Cllr. Jonathan Bacon, representing Bembridge, Brading and St. Helens, was elected unopposed as the new Leader. He stood down, along with deputy leader Cllr Steve Stubbings, in January 2017 citing 'the unwillingness of government to lift a finger to help and the preference for too many elected members to act negatively rather than try to help.'[5]

Following the resignations of the leader and deputy leader in January 2017, Conservative members assumed control of the administration, with Cllr Dave Stewart appointed as leader.[6] A new ruling executive was formed, made up of five Conservatives, one UKIP member and three non-aligned members.[7]

Party Composition as of 2018 [8]
Conservative 25
Island Independents 8
Independent 2
Liberal Democrat 2
Labour 1
Independent Green 1
Independent Labour 1

Coat of arms

The Coat of arms of the Isle of Wight was first granted to the County Council in 1938. On its abolition in 1995, they transferred to the new Isle of Wight Council.

The shield shows an image of Carisbrooke Castle, which was the historic seat of many island governors. At the bottom is the island's motto "All this beauty is of God".

Notes

  1. ^ County council gained unitary authority functions.

References

  1. ^ "Isle of Wight Council selects Conservative leader". BBC. 18 January 2017. Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  2. ^ "The Isle of Wight (Structural Change) Order 1994". www.opsi.gov.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2009.
  3. ^ "Pledge to fulfil election promises". Isle of Wight County Press. Retrieved 19 November 2009.
  4. ^ "Tories surge back in Island polls". Isle of Wight County Press. Retrieved 19 November 2009.
  5. ^ "Shock resignation of Isle of Wight Council leader and deputy". www.iwcp.co.uk. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  6. ^ "New leader for Isle of Wight Council". www.iwight.com. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  7. ^ "New council Executive announced". www.iwight.com. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  8. ^ https://www.iow.gov.uk/Council/how-it-works/Councillors/Isle-of-Wight-Council-Members

External links

2005 Isle of Wight Council election

The 2005 Isle of Wight Council elections were held on the Isle of Wight, England, on 5 May 2005. The result led to a landslide Conservative victory gaining 22 councillors, leading the Isle of Wight to Conservative control from no overall control previously.

2009 Isle of Wight Council election

The 2009 Isle of Wight Council elections were held on Thursday 4 June 2009.

After a review by the Local Government Boundary Commission for England, the number of seats on the council was reduced from 48 single-member wards, to a 40-member council, consisting of 38 single member wards, and one double-member ward.

2013 Isle of Wight Council election

The 2013 Isle of Wight Council election was held on 2 May 2013 to elect all 40 members for a four-year term to the Isle of Wight Council, a unitary authority which governs the Isle of Wight. Going into the election, the Conservative Party was looking to gain a third term in power after first being elected to overall control in 2005, but in one of the shock results of the wider local elections being held in the country, the Conservatives lost overall control of the council, having been reduced to 15 seats, 6 short of a majority of 21. The 'Island Independents', a mutually supporting group of candidates and councillors running as independents, gained the same number of seats, whilst other independents, UKIP, Labour, and a Liberal Democrat made up the remainder.

Emblematic of the election, the Conservative leader of the council, David Pugh, lost his own seat to an Island Independent. The popular perception of the reasons for the Conservative losses was, in the words of OnTheWight, 'It's widely thought that the way they implemented the financial cuts turned the Island against them. Particularly unpopular was the wholesale closing of the Tourist Information centres and public toilets.' With neither the Conservatives or the Island Independents gaining a majority outright, control of the authority was initially in doubt, but on 8 May the Island Independents announced the five non-aligned independents would be joining their group.

2017 Isle of Wight Council election

The 2017 Isle of Wight Council election took place on 4 May 2017 as part of the 2017 local elections in the United Kingdom. All 40 Councillors were elected from 39 electoral divisions, which each returned either one or two Councillors by first-past-the-post voting for a four-year term of office.

The result of the election saw the Isle of Wight Conservatives re-take majority control of the Isle of Wight Council after electing 25 Councillors. The Island Independents, who after the previous election had formed the ruling group dropped to eight. Elsewhere, the Liberal Democrats had a net gain of one, whilst Labour had a net loss of one. The results also saw the Green Party gain its first Isle of Wight Councillor, whilst UKIP lost both of its two Councillors.

Cowes Floating Bridge

The Cowes Floating Bridge is a vehicular chain ferry which crosses the River Medina on the Isle of Wight, off the south coast of England. The ferry crosses the tidal river from East Cowes to Cowes. The first floating bridge between the two towns was established in 1859 and the crossing is one of the few remaining that has not been replaced by a physical bridge. The service is owned and operated by the Isle of Wight Council, which has run it since 1901. Prior to ownership by the local authority the service was run by The Floating Bridge Company and The Steam Packet Company (Red Funnel). The ferry currently used is named No. 6, the sixth to be owned by the Isle of Wight Council, and ninth in total. It was built in 2017 and can carry up to 20 cars. The Cowes floating bridge remains the only way to cross the River Medina between the towns without taking a ten-mile trip via Newport. The current vessel was installed on 14 May 2017, but after a string of technical issues the service was suspended by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, and a passenger-only replacement service provided by a small launch. After several months of service suspension and intermittent operation, full service finally resumed early in 2018.

David Pugh (Conservative politician)

David Pugh (born 1980 in Newport) was a Conservative councillor and served as leader of the Isle of Wight Council between September 2007 and May 2013, making him the longest serving leader of the local authority since its inception in 1995. He was first elected to the Isle of Wight Council at the local elections in May 2005 as a member for the Shanklin Central Ward, re-elected in the June 2009 elections to the Shanklin South Ward, losing his seat in the 2013 local elections after 2 other candidates withdrew, making the election a straight choice between Pugh and Independent, Richard Priest. Consequently he ceased to be council leader.

Shortly after his failed re-election bid, Pugh resigned from Shanklin Town Council.

Flag of the Isle of Wight

The Flag of the Isle of Wight was adopted and registered in January 2009. It shows a diamond shape (the island) hovering over ocean waves. The indentation of the top corner of the diamond represents the River Medina, which is the largest river on the island.

Haylands

Haylands is an area just to the south of Ryde on the Isle of Wight, off the south coast of England. At the time of the 2011 Census the population etc. of Haylands is listed under Ryde. Located to the east, it is a short walk away from housing estates at Pell and Binstead.

The settlement consists mainly of a housing development, including some ex-local authority housing, a corner shop in Upton Road, a primary and a middle school. It is not far from Ryde High School at Pell Lane. In the centre of Haylands there is a pub called Lake Huron. The pub's name originates from the Lake family, a 19th-century family of brewers who owned several pubs naming them after the Great Lakes of North America, Lake Huron is the only one to have survived.

Haylands forms part of the local electoral ward of Havenstreet, Ashey and Haylands and at the Isle of Wight Council election in 2009 elected Independent councillor Vanessa Churchman.

The settlement lies to the west of the A3055 road. Haylands is approximately 5.5 miles (8.9 km) north-east of Newport. Southern Vectis route 4 used to link the area with Ryde and East Cowes. However this caused the journey time to increase significantly and the area was later withdrawn from the service and after negotiations a limited replacement service was put in place. This service was later improved and is now run as route 37.

Isle of Wight Council elections

Isle of Wight is a unitary authority and former non-metropolitan county in England.

Isle of Wight Festival 2010

The Isle of Wight Festival 2010 was the ninth revived Isle of Wight Festival to be held at Seaclose Park in Newport on the Isle of Wight. The event ran from 11 until 13 June 2010. Tickets were released on Friday 4 December 2009.

The 2010 event was the last in the current contract with the Isle of Wight Council to take place, tying in with the last event for Festival First, guaranteeing festival-goers a ticket for three years. Event organisers Solo are in discussion with the Isle of Wight Council to seal a deal to guarantee the Festival continue for a further ten years.The first acts were confirmed as Jay-Z, The Strokes, Blondie, Pink, Squeeze and Orbital.

Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue Service

Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering the Isle of Wight off the south coast of England.

In March 2007, the Isle of Wight Council voted to maintain the independence of the Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue service, instead of a merger with the Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service.Later in February 2009, plans were announced for a three-year £8 million replacement programme changing part-time stations to full-time. The move would be done in an attempt to reduce response times to 999 alerts. It could see Ryde's fire station change to full-time, and possibly Sandown's, but part-time stations would continue to operate as normal in rural areas. The extra investment would also minimise chances of a future merger with Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service on the mainland.On a 2009 assessment by a government watchdog, the service was found to be performing well, getting a three star rating out of four, after a poor rating in 2005.

J. Samuel White's Ground

J. Samuel White's Ground (also known as Plessey Ground) is a sports ground in Park Road, Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. The ground is owned by the Isle of Wight Council and is surrounded by residential housing. A multitude of sports have been played at the ground, including cricket, football and bowls.

Medina, Isle of Wight

Medina was a non-metropolitan district with the status of a borough on the Isle of Wight in England from 1974 to 1995.

The district was formed by the Local Government Act 1972, and was a merger of the municipal boroughs of Newport and Ryde along with the urban district of Cowes. It was one of two districts on the Island formed in 1974 - the other was South Wight.

"Medina" was an older name for Newport which has been preserved in the River Medina.

Following a review by the Local Government Commission for England, the borough was abolished on 1 April 1995, when a single Isle of Wight Council replaced the Island's county council and two district councils.

Medina Borough Council elections

Medina was a non-metropolitan district in Isle of Wight, England. It was abolished on 1 April 1995 and replaced by Isle of Wight Council.

Politics of the Isle of Wight

As a geographical entity distinct from the mainland, the Isle of Wight has always fought to have this identity recognised. The Isle of Wight is currently a ceremonial and Non-metropolitan county and as it has no district councils (only the county council) it is effectively a unitary county. The island is also the highest populated Westminster constituency in the country.

Rew Down

Rew Down is a 23.5-hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest and Local Nature Reserve located on the south-east edge of the Isle of Wight in the hills to the west of Ventnor.

The area is a chalk grassland sloping to the south and offering panoramic and far-reaching views of the English Channel. It has the Stenbury Trail running along its western boundary and the Ventnor golf club to the north.

It is managed by the Isle of Wight Council and is noted for its Highland cattle, which have grazed the land since 2003.

The area contains the remains of the tower base of, Historic England Grade II listed, Royal Navy World War II direction finding (D/F) station (one of the'Y-stations'), Ventnor, which is believed to be the most complete of its type still extant.

South Wight

South Wight was a non-metropolitan district with the status of a borough on the Isle of Wight in England from 1974 to 1995.

The district was formed by the Local Government Act 1972, and was a merger of Sandown-Shanklin and Ventnor urban districts and Isle of Wight Rural District. It was one of two districts on the island formed in 1974 – the other was Medina.

Following a review by the Local Government Commission for England, the borough was abolished on 1 April 1995, when a single Isle of Wight Council replaced the island's county council and two district councils.

South Wight Borough Council elections

South Wight was a non-metropolitan district in Isle of Wight, England. It was abolished on 1 April 1995 and replaced by Isle of Wight Council.

Wightbus

Not to be confused with Wrightbus, the bus manufacturer

Wightbus was a bus operator on the Isle of Wight, owned by the Isle of Wight Council. It operated a network of 13 local bus services running across the island, mostly services which would not have been viable for the island's dominant commercial operator, Southern Vectis, to operate.

Wightbus also provided school buses, and transported disabled adults to various day care centres on behalf of the council's social services department. A dial-a-bus service was run over some parts of the island to residents who would be unable to leave their homes to catch a regular service bus.

The Wightbus fleet was made up of 27 vehicles with capacities ranging from 16 to 72. Around 40 trained drivers and passenger-escort staff were employed. Over 1 million passengers travelled on Wightbus services annually.Wightbus was axed by the Isle of Wight Council in February 2011, with the last services operating on 2 September 2011. Under a new "Community Bus Partnership", Southern Vectis agreed to take on a number of routes previously operated by Wightbus to rural areas of the island in co-ordination with the Isle of Wight Council and the town and parish councils which the services run in. The services are all run by volunteer drivers.

Districts
Councils
Local elections

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