Island country

An island country is a country whose primary territory consists of one or more islands or parts of islands. As of 2011, 46 (approximately 24%[1]) of the 193 UN member states are island countries.

Island nations
Sovereign states and states with limited recognition fully on islands (Australia is regarded a continent): those with land borders shaded green, and those without shaded dark blue

Politics

The percentage of island countries that are democratic is higher than that of continental countries. Historically they have been less prone to political instability than their continental counterparts.[1]

War

Island countries have often been the basis of maritime conquest and historical rivalry between other countries.[2] Island countries are more susceptible to attack by large, continental countries due to their size and dependence on sea and air lines of communication.[3] Many island countries are also vulnerable to predation by mercenaries and other foreign invaders,[4] although their isolation also makes them a difficult target.

Natural resources

Many island countries rely heavily on fish for their main supply of food.[5] Some are turning to renewable energy—such as wind power, hydropower, geothermal power and biodiesel from copra oil—to combat the rise in oil prices.[6]

Geography

Some island countries are more affected than other countries by climate change, which produces problems such as reduced land use, water scarcity and sometimes even resettlement issues. Some low-lying island countries are slowly being submerged by the rising water levels of the Pacific Ocean.[7] Climate change also impacts island countries by causing natural disasters such as tropical cyclones, hurricanes, flash floods and drought.[8] In 2011, the Center for Climate Change Law (CCCL) held a conference attended by 272 registrants from 39 island nations titled Legal Issues for Threatened Island Nations.[9]

Economics

Many island countries rely heavily on imports and are greatly affected by changes in the global economy.[10] Due to the nature of island countries their economies are often characterised by being smaller, relatively isolated from world trade and economy, more vulnerable to shipping costs, and more likely to suffer environmental damage to infrastructure; exceptions include Japan and the United Kingdom.[11][12][13] The dominant industry for many island countries is tourism.[14]

Composition

Island countries are typically small with low populations, although some, like Indonesia and Japan are notable exceptions.[15]

Some island countries are centred on one or two major islands, such as the United Kingdom, Trinidad and Tobago, New Zealand, Cuba, Bahrain, Singapore, Iceland, Malta, and Taiwan. Others are spread out over hundreds or thousands of smaller islands, such as Indonesia, the Philippines, The Bahamas, Seychelles, and the Maldives. Some island countries share one or more of their islands with other countries, such as the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland; Haiti and the Dominican Republic; and Indonesia, which shares islands with Papua New Guinea, Brunei, East Timor, and Malaysia.

Geographically, the country of Australia is considered a continental landmass rather than an island, covering the largest landmass of the Australian continent. In the past, however, it was considered an island country for tourism purposes[16] (among others) and is sometimes referred to as such.[17]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Ott, Dan (1996). Small is Democratic. Routledge. p. 128. ISBN 0-8153-3910-0.
  2. ^ Chasle, Raymond (1 Oct 1986). "The quest for identity. (island countries)". UNESCO Courier. Retrieved 2009-02-01.
  3. ^ Perry, Walt L.; Robert W. Button; Jerome Bracken; Thomas Sullivan; Rand Corporation; United States Navy; Jonathan Mitchell (2002). Measures of Effectiveness for the Information-age Navy. Rand Corporation. p. 7. ISBN 0-8330-3139-2.
  4. ^ WREN, CHRISTOPHER S. (December 9, 1989). "Mercenary Holding Island Nation Seeks Deal". New York Times. Retrieved 2009-02-01.
  5. ^ "Many of the world's poorest people depend on fish". Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. 2005-06-07. Retrieved 2017-09-30.
  6. ^ Xingwei, Huang (2008-10-17). "Pacific Islands countries switch to renewable energy source due to increasing fuel prices". Archived from the original on 2015-04-02. Retrieved 2009-02-01.
  7. ^ "Leader of disappearing island nation says climate change an issue of survival, not economics". June 5, 2008. Retrieved 2009-02-01.
  8. ^ "FAO: Climate change threatens food security of Pacific island countries". December 2, 2008. Retrieved 2009-02-01.
  9. ^ "Threatened Island Nations Conference - The Earth Institute - Columbia University". www.earth.columbia.edu. Retrieved 19 April 2018.
  10. ^ "Global economic crisis a concern for Pacific island countries". 2008-10-28. Retrieved 2009-02-01.
  11. ^ "WTO/FORSEC Trade Policy Course for Pacific island countries". 9 March 2001. Retrieved 2009-02-01.
  12. ^ "NZ calls for global solutions to problems faced by small island nations". 2005-01-18. Archived from the original on 2012-10-24. Retrieved 2009-02-01.
  13. ^ Garg, Sarika. "U.N. ambassador gives keynote". Retrieved 2017-09-05.
  14. ^ "China enlists Pacific island countries as tourist destinations, XINHUA". The America's Intelligence Wire. 10 August 2004. Retrieved 1 February 2009.
  15. ^ "Wen pledges new aid to Pacific countries". International Herald Tribune. April 5, 2006. Retrieved 2013-08-21.
  16. ^ "Australian Naval Defence". The Brisbane Courier. 24 July 1897. Retrieved 2009-01-31.
  17. ^ "China, Pacific island countries discuss cooperation at forum meeting". Retrieved 2009-02-01.
Awal

Awal (Arabic: أوال‎) is an ancient name of Bahrain, an island country in the Persian Gulf. The name Awal had remained in use, probably for eight centuries. Awal Premi was derived from the name of a god that used to be worshiped by the inhabitants of the islands before the advent of Islam. Awal resembled the head of an ox. As for the meaning of this name, there are ʼawwal 'first, first part, previous'; ʼawwalan 'firstly, at first'; ʼawwalī 'prime, primordial, original'.

Before Islam Bahrain's administrative name was Mishmahig and it was also called Tylos by the Ancient Greeks. If the name /Tulos/ is related to /ṭiwal/ 'rope with which the feet of draught-cattle are tied together', then the cattle-representation of this deity may be thus confirmed.

Cook Islands

The Cook Islands (Cook Islands Māori: Kūki 'Āirani) is a self-governing island country in the South Pacific Ocean in free association with New Zealand. It comprises 15 islands whose total land area is 240 square kilometres (92.7 sq mi). The Cook Islands' Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) covers 1,800,000 square kilometres (690,000 sq mi) of ocean.New Zealand is responsible for the Cook Islands' defence and foreign affairs, but they are exercised in consultation with the Cook Islands. In recent times, the Cook Islands have adopted an increasingly independent foreign policy. Although Cook Islanders are citizens of New Zealand, they have the status of Cook Islands nationals, which is not given to other New Zealand citizens.

The Cook Islands' main population centres are on the island of Rarotonga (10,572 in 2011), where there is an international airport. There is a larger population of Cook Islanders in New Zealand itself; in the 2013 census, 61,839 people said they were Cook Islanders, or of Cook Islands descent.With about 100,000 visitors travelling to the islands in the 2010–11 financial year, tourism is the country's main industry, and the leading element of the economy, ahead of offshore banking, pearls, and marine and fruit exports.

Eastport, New York

Eastport is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) in Suffolk County, New York, United States. The population was 1,831 at the 2010 census.Eastport straddles the border of the towns of Brookhaven and Southampton.

Eastport is located within the Eastport-South Manor Central School District.

Gros Islet

Gros Islet (English: Large Island) is a community near the northern tip of the island country of Saint Lucia. Originally a quiet fishing village, it has gone on to become one of the more popular tourist destinations in the country.Settled by the Carib (and possibly Arawak), the area was first identified as Gros Islet in a French map from 1717. The community was a Roman Catholic parish, as the first priests who arrived on the island settled in the village in 1749. Gros Islet was first settled by the French from Martinique.

In 1778, as a retaliation for the declaration of war on the British by the French, the British navy captured the island of Saint Lucia from the French and built a naval base at Gros Islet Bay in 1782, temporarily changing the name to Fort Rodney. The island has switched hands between the British and French throughout its existence.

Between 1991 and 2001 the population rose 54%; the highest rise in the country. In 2001, the population was 19,409, making it the secondmost-populous community in Saint Lucia, up from 13,505 in the 1991 census and 10,164 in the 1980 edition. Of this number, 9,307 were male and 10,102 were female.A nearby mangrove swamp was dredged to form Rodney Bay Marina and many hotels, resorts, and villas have since been built. However the old village of Gros Islet is still a flourishing district.

In September of the year 2011, Parliamentary Representative Honourable Leonard Montoute advised that the constituency may become St. Lucia's second city, if the expansion plans for the area progress in accordance with its development blue print.

Jamaica

Jamaica ( (listen)) is an island country situated in the Caribbean Sea. Spanning 10,990 square kilometres (4,240 sq mi) in area, it is the third-largest island of the Greater Antilles and the fourth-largest island country in the Caribbean. Jamaica lies about 145 kilometres (90 mi) south of Cuba, and 191 kilometres (119 mi) west of Hispaniola (the island containing the countries of Haiti and the Dominican Republic).

Previously inhabited by the indigenous Arawak and Taíno peoples, the island came under Spanish rule following the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1494. Many of the indigenous people died of disease, and the Spanish transplanted African slaves to Jamaica as labourers. The island remained a possession of Spain until 1655, when England (later Great Britain) conquered it and renamed it Jamaica. Under British colonial rule Jamaica became a leading sugar exporter, with its plantation economy highly dependent on African slaves. The British fully emancipated all slaves in 1838, and many freedmen chose to have subsistence farms rather than to work on plantations. Beginning in the 1840s, the British utilized Chinese and Indian indentured labour to work on plantations. The island achieved independence from the United Kingdom on 6 August 1962.

With 2.9 million people, Jamaica is the third-most populous Anglophone country in the Americas (after the United States and Canada), and the fourth-most populous country in the Caribbean. Kingston is the country's capital and largest city, with a population of 937,700. Jamaicans mainly have African ancestry, with significant European, Chinese, Indian, Lebanese, and mixed-race minorities. Due to a high rate of emigration for work since the 1960s, Jamaica has a large diaspora around the world, particularly in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Jamaica is a Commonwealth realm, with Queen Elizabeth II as its monarch and head of state. Her appointed representative in the country is the Governor-General of Jamaica, an office held by Sir Patrick Allen since 2009. Andrew Holness has served as the head of government and Prime Minister of Jamaica from March 2016. Jamaica is a parliamentary constitutional monarchy with legislative power vested in the bicameral Parliament of Jamaica, consisting of an appointed Senate and a directly elected House of Representatives.

Japanese

Japanese may refer to:

Something from or related to Japan, an island country in East Asia

Japanese language, spoken mainly in Japan

Japanese people, the ethnic group that identifies with Japan through culture or ancestry

Japanese diaspora, Japanese emigrants and their descendants around the world

Foreign-born Japanese, naturalized citizens of Japan

Japanese writing system, consisting of kanji and kana

Japanese cuisine, the food and food culture of Japan

List of airports in Iceland

This is a list of airports in Iceland, sorted by location.

Iceland (Icelandic: Ísland) is a European island country located in the North Atlantic Ocean on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It has a population of about 320,000 and a total area of 103,000 km2 (39,769 sq mi). The capital and largest city is Reykjavík.

List of airports in Singapore

This is a list of airports in Singapore, grouped by type and sorted by location.

Singapore, officially the Republic of Singapore, is an island country off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator, south of the Malaysian state of Johor and north of Indonesia's Riau Islands. Singapore is a city-state.

List of airports in the Maldives

This is a list of airports in the Maldives, grouped by type and sorted by location.

The Maldives or Maldive Islands, officially the Republic of Maldives, is an island country in the Indian Ocean formed by a double chain of twenty-six atolls stretching in a north-south direction off India's Lakshadweep islands, between Minicoy Island and Chagos Archipelago. It stands in the Laccadive Sea, about 700 kilometres (435 mi) southwest of Sri Lanka.

The atolls of Maldives encompass a territory spread over roughly 90,000 square kilometres (34,749 sq mi), making it one of the most disparate countries in the world. It features 1,192 islets, of which two hundred are inhabited. The Republic of Maldives's capital and largest city is Malé.

List of diplomatic missions of Seychelles

This is a list of diplomatic missions of Seychelles. The Indian Ocean island country of the Seychelles only has seven diplomatic missions overseas, although it has a very large number of honorary consulates (not listed below).

List of waterfalls of Iceland

Iceland is unusually suited for waterfalls. This island country has a north Atlantic climate that produces frequent rain and snow and a near-Arctic location that produces large glaciers, whose summer melts feed many rivers. As a result, it is home to a number of large and powerful waterfalls.

Miss Grenada World

Miss Grenada World beauty pageant selects representatives for the Miss World pageant from Grenada, an island country in the Caribbean Sea. The winner receives nationwide media exposure, thousands of dollars in prizes, an all-expense paid trip to the Miss World contest and the opportunity to travel the world to act as an ambassador for various charitable causes.

Music of São Tomé and Príncipe

São Tomé and Príncipe is an island country off the coast of Africa. Culturally, the people are African but have been highly influenced by the Portuguese rulers of the islands.

São Toméans are known for ússua and socopé rhythms, while Principe is home to the dêxa beat. Portuguese ballroom dancing may have played an integral part in the development of these rhythms and their associated dances.

Tchiloli is a musical dance performance that tells a dramatic story. The danço-congo is similarly a combination of music, dance and theatre.

New York's 14th congressional district

New York's 14th congressional district is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives located in New York City, represented by Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

The district includes the eastern part of the Bronx and part of north-central Queens. The Queens portion includes the neighborhoods of Astoria, College Point, Corona, East Elmhurst, Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, and Woodside. The Bronx portion of the district includes the neighborhoods of City Island, Country Club, Morris Park, Parkchester, Pelham Bay, Schuylerville, and Throggs Neck. Roughly half of the population of the district is of Hispanic or Latino heritage, making it one of the more Latino districts in New York. Before redistricting for the 2012 election, much of the area was in New York's 7th congressional district.

From 2003 to 2013, the district encompassed much of what is now New York's 12th congressional district, including Central Park and the East Side of Manhattan; all of Roosevelt Island; and the neighborhoods of Astoria, Long Island City, and Sunnyside in Queens.

Oranjestad, Aruba

Oranjestad (Dutch pronunciation: [oːˈrɑɲəstɑt]; literally "Orange Town") is the capital and largest city of Aruba. Oranjestad is located on the southern coast near the western end of the island country. In the local language, Papiamento, Oranjestad is often referred to simply as "Playa". As of 2015, the population of the capital was around 35,000.

Politics of Curaçao

The politics of Curaçao reflect a nation that has experienced conflict between its two major immigrant groups. One represents immigrants from the Netherlands, now a small minority, the other descendants of African slaves, well into the majority. In 2010 Curaçao became an autonomous country as part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Until that election the island country in the Caribbean off the coast of Venezuela was part of the Netherlands Antilles. Sint Maarten island also became autonomous, while the less-populated islands of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba are cities governed by the Netherlands.

Russia–Tonga relations

The Kingdom of Tonga and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics established formal diplomatic relations in 1976. Tonga was the first Pacific Island country to establish relations with the USSR. The USSR was dissolved in 1991 and was succeeded by Russia as the successor state.

On October 2, 2005, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov and Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of Tonga ST T. Tupou exhchanged telegrams offering congratulations on the occasion of 30th anniversary of establishing diplomatic relations between the two nations. In his heads of foreign ministries of Russia and Tonga expressed confidence in further development of Russian-Tongan relations in the interests of the peoples of both countries and strengthen peace and security in the Asia-Pacific region.Russia has a non-resident ambassador in Canberra, Australia.

Seychelles at the 2012 Summer Olympics

The African island country of Seychelles competed at the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London, United Kingdom from 27 July to 12 August 2012. This was the nation's eighth appearance at the Olympics, except the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul because of its partial support to the North Korean boycott.

The Seychelles Olympic and Commonwealth Games Association (SOCGA) sent the nation's smallest delegation to the Games. A total of 6 athletes, 4 men and 2 women, competed in four different sports. Four Seychellois athletes received their spots in track and field, and in swimming by wild card entries. Judoka and Olympic qualifier Dominic Dugasse was the nation's flag bearer at the opening ceremony. For the first time since 1984, Seychellois athletes did not qualify in sailing and weightlifting.

Seychelles has yet to win its first ever Olympic medal.

Spike Island, County Cork

Spike Island (Irish: Inis Píc) is an island of 103 acres (42 ha) in Cork Harbour, Ireland. Originally the site of a monastic settlement, the island is dominated by an 18th-century star fort named Fort Mitchel. The island's strategic location within the harbour meant it was used at times for defence and as a prison. Since the early 21st century the island has been developed as a heritage tourist attraction, with €5.5m investment in exhibition and visitor spaces and accompanying tourism marketing. There were in excess of 10,000 visitors to the island during the month of August 2016. Spike Island was named top European tourist attraction at the 2017 World Travel Awards.

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