Isabell Herlovsen

Isabell Lehn Herlovsen (born 23 June 1988) is a Norwegian football player who is currently playing for Kolbotn after moving home from China and the club Jiangsu Suning.[1][2] She plays as a midfielder and a striker.

Herlovsen is the daughter of former football player Kai Erik Herlovsen and was born in Germany during his spell at Borussia Mönchengladbach. She is a Norwegian women's international having made her debut at the age of 16. Herlovsen was the youngest player at UEFA Women's Euro 2005 and became the youngest goal-scorer in the tournament's history on 9 June 2005 when she scored a goal in a 1–1 draw against France.[3]

Isabell Herlovsen
Isabell Herlovsen2
Personal information
Full name Isabell Lehn Herlovsen
Date of birth 23 June 1988 (age 31)
Place of birth Mönchengladbach, West Germany
Height 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Kolbotn
Number 11
Youth career
2000–2004 Kolbotn
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2004–2009 Kolbotn 95 (48)
2009–2010 Olympique Lyon 13 (3)
2011–2017 LSK Kvinner 108 (100)
2017 Jiangsu Suning
2018– Vålerenga 19 (6)
2019–Kolbotn (loan) 9 (4)
National team
2005– Norway 128 (60)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15 June 2019
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 01:55, 12 June 2019 (UTC)

Career

Herlovsen began her career at Kolbotn IL. She made her debut with the club in 2004 and played for five seasons winning two league titles in 2005 and 2006 and winning the women's national cup in 2007. Herlovsen had her first appearance for the Norwegian national team at the age of 16. In her first major tournament, Herlovsen was the youngest player at the competition. She scored two goals; one against France in the group stage and another against Sweden in the semi-finals. Norway won the match 3–2, but lost 3–1 in the final to Germany. Following the tournament, Herlovsen drew interest from the women's section of English club Arsenal. The two sides met for negotiations, but were unable to reach an agreement.[4]

At the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup in China, Herlovsen scored one goal in the group stage against Ghana. In the quarter-finals she scored the game-winning goal in Norway's 1–0 victory over the hosts, thus eliminating China from the tournament, in front of 50,000 spectators. In the semi-finals, Norway again lost to Germany. Later that year, Herlovsen scored for her club Kolbotn in the 2007 edition of the women's Norwegian Cup. The players received their championship medals from the King of Norway. On 9 June 2008, Herlovsen was named to the national team squad to play in the women's tournament at the 2008 Summer Olympics.[5]

In August 2009 Herlovsen was selected for the Norway team that had qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 in Finland. With a steady place in the team for the first time, as a striker, she played all matches and won praise for her energetic and accurate play even at times as the team's single front runner. Norway beat Sweden unexpectedly in the quarter finals only to lose to the champions Germany in the semifinal in which Herlovsen scored Norway's only goal.

On 28 October 2009, Herlovsen's parent club Kolbotn announced that the player, alongside club and national team teammate Christine Colombo Nilsen, would be joining Olympique Lyonnais of the Division 1 Féminine.[6] She made her debut for the club on 8 November 2009 coming on as a substitute in a 6–1 victory over Juvisy. Herlovsen scored her first goal for the club on 7 March 2010 scoring a brace in a 9–0 victory over Muret in the Challenge de France. She later featured in the final match of the UEFA Women's Champions League in 2010.

In February 2017, Herlovsen signed a contract with the Chinese club Jiangsu Suning F.C., at the same time taking a break from playing for the Norwegian national team.[7] In her Chinese debut match she scored a goal.[8]

Personal life

Herlovsen's home is in Fredrikstad. Her father is Kai Erik Herlovsen, a former Norwegian international footballer who also played professionally in Germany for Borussia Mönchengladbach. Isabell has an older sister and a younger brother. In July 2011 Herlovsen came out as a lesbian, having been out to friends and family while in her teens.[9]

Career statistics

As of 15 June 2019
Club Season Division League Cup Continental Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Kolbotn 2004 Toppserien 10 6 3 4 - 13 10
2005 18 13 4 2 - 22 15
2006 13 4 0 0 - 13 4
2007 19 5 0 0 - 19 5
2008 21 7 0 0 - 21 7
2009 14 13 0 0 - 14 13
Total 95 48 7 6 - - 102 54
Lyon 2009–10 Division 1 Féminine 9 0 0 0 5 0 14 0
2010–11 4 3 0 0 2 0 6 3
Total 13 3 0 0 7 0 20 3
LSK Kvinner 2011 Toppserien 16 6 1 1 - 17 7
2012 22 25 2 0 - 24 25
2013 17 5 1 1 2 0 20 6
2014 20 15 4 7 - 24 22
2015 12 19 3 3 2 0 17 22
2016 21 30 4 4 2 0 27 34
Total 108 100 15 16 6 0 129 116
Vålerenga 2018 Toppserien 19 6 3 6 - 22 12
Total 19 6 3 6 - - 22 12
Kolbotn (loan) 2019 Toppserien 9 4 0 0 - 9 4
Total 9 4 0 0 - - 9 4
Career total 244 161 25 28 13 0 282 189

International goals

Honours

Club

Kolbotn
Lyon
LSK Kvinner
Jiangsu Suning
  • Chinese Women's FA Cup: 2017

Individual

References

  1. ^ "Herlovsen libérée de son contrat avec Lyon" (in French). FootoFeminin. 9 December 2010. Retrieved 15 December 2010.
  2. ^ "Isabell Herlovsen". Store Norske Leksikon. Retrieved 16 June 2010.
  3. ^ "Norway Player profile – Isabell Lehn Herlovsen". UEFA. Archived from the original on 28 March 2010. Retrieved 16 June 2010.
  4. ^ Eriksen, Klaus (4 August 2005). "Herlovsen sa nei til Arsenal" (in Norwegian). Verdens Gang. Retrieved 24 September 2014.
  5. ^ Drømmen gikk i oppfyllelse
  6. ^ Herlovsen and Colombo to Lyon Archived 7 September 2012 at Archive.today
  7. ^ Bryne, Lars; Hansen, Jonathan Simchai (9 February 2017). "Herlovsen solgt til kinesisk fotball – tar pause fra landslaget" (in Norwegian). NRK. Retrieved 30 March 2017.
  8. ^ Bryne, Lars (30 March 2017). "Herlovsen på ufrivillig slankekur etter matsjokk i Kina" (in Norwegian). NRK. Retrieved 30 March 2017.
  9. ^ Ingrid Marie Treborg (5 July 2011). "Isabell Herlovsen står fram som lesbisk" (in Norwegian). TV2.no. Retrieved 14 September 2011.

External links

2005 Toppserien

The 2005 season of the Toppserien, the first-tier women's football (soccer) league in Norway, began on 16 April 2005 and ended on 22 October 2005.

18 games were played with 3 points given for wins and 1 for draws. Number nine and ten were originally relegated, but ninth-placed Liungen survived after Asker was forcibly relegated due to economic license issues. The two top teams from the First Division were promoted.

Kolbotn won the league.

2007 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The UEFA Women's U-19 Championship 2007 Final Tournament was held in Iceland between 18–29 July 2007. Players born after 1 January 1988 were eligible to participate in this competition.

2010 UEFA Women's Champions League Final

The 2010 UEFA Women's Champions League Final was held at Coliseum Alfonso Pérez in Getafe, Spain, on 20 May 2010. It was the first final of the competition after the rebranding from Women's Cup to the Champions League. The final saw Turbine Potsdam beat Lyon 7–6 on penalties after a 0-0 draw after extra time.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Group D

Group D of the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup consisted of the teams from Brazil, Australia, Norway and Equatorial Guinea. The games were played on 29 June, 3 July and 6 July 2011. The top two teams advanced to the knockout stage.

2012 Toppserien

The 2012 Toppserien is the twenty-sixth season of top-tier women's football in Norway since its establishment in 1987. A total of 12 teams contested the league, ten returning from the 2011 season and the two teams promoted from the First Division, Vålerenga and Fart.

The season started on 14 April 2012.

2014 Toppserien

The 2014 Toppserien is the twenty-eighth season of top-tier women's football in Norway since its establishment in 1987. A total of 12 teams are contesting the league, eleven returning from the 2013 season and the one teams promoted from the First Division, Grand Bodø.

The season started on 21 April 2014 and ended on 1 November 2014.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Group B

Group B of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup consisted of Germany, Ivory Coast, Norway and Thailand. Matches were played from 7 to 15 June 2015.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup statistics

The following article outlines the statistics for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, which took place in Canada from 6 June to 5 July.

Goals scored from penalty shoot-outs are not counted, and matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws.

2015 Toppserien

The 2015 Toppserien is the twenty-nine season of top-tier women's football in Norway since its establishment in 1987. A total of 12 teams contested for the league, eleven returning from the 2014 season and the one teams promoted from the First Division, Sandviken.

The season started on 28 March 2015 and ended on 7 November 2015.

2016 Toppserien

The 2016 Toppserien was the 30th season of the women's football top level league in Norway. LSK Kvinner FK were the defending champions and defended their title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group A

Group A of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 7 to 17 June 2019. The group consisted of hosts France, Nigeria, Norway and South Korea. The top two teams, France and Norway, along with the third-placed team, Nigeria (as one of the four best third-placed teams), advanced to the round of 16.

2019 Toppserien

The 2019 Toppserien is the 33rd season of the highest women's football league in Norway. LSK Kvinner entered the season as the defending champions.

Bjarne Berntsen

Bjarne Berntsen (born 21 December 1956) is a Norwegian football coach and former player. He is currently the manager of Eliteserien club Viking.

Chinese Women's Super League

The Chinese Women's Super League (CWSL) is the top level women's football league in China. It was called the Chinese Women's National Football League from 2011 to 2014.

Herlovsen

Herlovsen is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Isabell Herlovsen (born 1988), Norwegian footballer

Kai Erik Herlovsen (born 1959), Norwegian footballer and manager

Kai Erik Herlovsen

Kai Erik Herlovsen (born 25 September 1959) is a Norwegian football coach and former player.Herlovsen was usually used in the central defence or as a defensive midfielder. He was capped 34 times for Norway, and played in the 1984 Summer Olympics. On club level he began and ended his career in Fredrikstad, with a seven-year-long professional spell in Borussia Mönchengladbach in between.He currently coaches Lisleby FK. His daughter Isabell Herlovsen is a current Norway international.

Kolbotn

Kolbotn is the centre of Oppegård, Norway. The population is about 8,000. Kolbotn has several elementary schools, four middle schools and a high school. Town is located at the end of Kolbotnvannet, a lake.

Jazz guitarist Eivind Aarset was born in Kolbotn in 1961, and the Norwegian black metal band Darkthrone formed there in 1986. There's also a lot of known rappers as well, like Vinni, Cast from Equicez, Feit'n fra Kolbotn, Saile, and more.

The football team Kolbotn IL hails from here. In 2006 Kolbotn women's team were top of the top league for women in Norway, the Toppserien. The team included Norwegian national footballers Solveig Gulbrandsen, Trine Rønning, Christine Colombo Nilsen and Isabell Herlovsen. Striker Rebecca Angus from Middlesbrough, England also played four seasons for Kolbotn in 2007-10. Kolbotn won the 2007 Cup competition by beating Asker 4-2 on 10-11-07. Kolbotn finished in third place in the Toppserien league for three seasons 2009-11 while coached by Dan Eggen.

In the Norwegian legal drama Aber Bergen, lead character Erik Aber is "a Kolbotn boy" and implies he is from a rough neighborhood compared to his refined middle class Bergen wife, Elea Wessel.

Kolbotn Fotball

Kolbotn IL Fotball is a sub-section under the sports club Kolbotn IL from Kolbotn, Norway. The club started football in 1916 and organized football as a semi-autonomous sub-section in 1960.

The women's team plays in Toppserien and is one of the most successful in Norway with three league titles (2002, 2005 and 2006) and one cup title (2007).

The men's team resides in the 4. divisjon (fifth tier of the Norwegian football league system), after being relegated from the 3. divisjon in 2011 and played in the 2. divisjon as late as 1993.

UEFA Women's Euro 2005

The 2005 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2005, was a football tournament for women held from 5 June to 19 June 2005 in Lancashire, England and Cheshire, England. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.Germany won the competition for the fourth consecutive tournament, and the sixth time overall (including one win in the predecessor tournament, the European Competition for Representative Women's Teams). Their championship win was the last for coach Tina Theune-Meyer, who months earlier had announced her retirement effective at the end of the tournament. In her nine years in charge of Germany, they won three European titles, two bronze medals in the Olympics, and the 2003 World Cup.

Key (expand for notes on “international goals” and sorting)
Location Geographic location of the venue where the competition occurred
Sorted by country name first, then by city name
Lineup Start – played entire match
on minute (off player) – substituted on at the minute indicated, and player was substituted off at the same time

off minute (on player) – substituted off at the minute indicated, and player was substituted on at the same time
(c) – captain
Sorted by minutes played

Min The minute in the match the goal was scored. For list that include caps, blank indicates played in the match but did not score a goal.
Assist/pass The ball was passed by the player, which assisted in scoring the goal. This column depends on the availability and source of this information.
penalty or pk Goal scored on penalty-kick which was awarded due to foul by opponent. (Goals scored in penalty-shoot-out, at the end of a tied match after extra-time, are not included.)
Score The match score after the goal was scored.
Sorted by goal difference, then by goal scored by the player's team
Result The final score.

Sorted by goal difference in the match, then by goal difference in penalty-shoot-out if it is taken, followed by goal scored by the player's team in the match, then by goal scored in the penalty-shoot-out. For matches with identical final scores, match ending in extra-time without penalty-shoot-out is a tougher match, therefore precede matches that ended in regulation

aet The score at the end of extra-time; the match was tied at the end of 90' regulation
pso Penalty-shoot-out score shown in parenthesis; the match was tied at the end of extra-time
Light-yellow background color – match at an invitational tournament
Light-orange background color – Olympic women's football qualification match

NOTE: some keys may not apply for a particular football player

Goal Date Location Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 9 June 2005 Halliwell Jones Stadium, Warrington, England  France

1–1

1–1

2005 UEFA Women's Championship
2. 16 June 2005 Halliwell Jones Stadium, Warrington, England  Sweden

2–1

3–2

3. 20 September 2007 Yellow Dragon Stadium, Hangzhou, China  Ghana

4–0

7–2

2007 FIFA Women's World Cup
4. 23 September 2007 Wuhan Stadium, Wuhan, China  China PR

1–0

1–0

5. 25 June 2008 City Stadium, Kutno, Poland  Poland

3–0

3–0

UEFA Women's Euro 2009 qualifying
6. 19 August 2009 Enavallen, Enkjöping, Sweden  Sweden

1–0

1–0

Friendly
7. 29 October 2009 Nadderud stadion, Bærum, Norway  Netherlands

3–0

3–0

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA)
8. 26 February 2010 José Arcanjo Stadium, Olhão, Portugal  United States

1–1

1–2

2010 Algarve Cup
9. 27 March 2010 AKA Arena, Hønefoss, Norway  North Macedonia

1–0

14–0

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA)
10.

3–0

11.

4–0

12.

8–0

13.

10–0

14.

12–0

15. 30 March 2010 Neman Stadium, Grodno, Belarus  Belarus

3–0

5–0

16. 19 June 2010 Oosterenkstadion, Zwolle, The Netherlands  Netherlands

1–1

2–2

17. 26 October 2010 Falkenburg, Sweden  Sweden

2–1

3–1

Friendly
18. 21 September 2011 Nadderud Stadion, Nadderud, Norway  Hungary

2–0

6–0

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying
19.

3–0

20. 19 November 2011 Mourneview Park, Lurgan, Northern Ireland  Northern Ireland

1–2

1–3

21. 29 February 2012 Estádio Municipal, Parchal, Portugal  Japan

1–0

1–2

2012 Algarve Cup
22. 16 June 2012 Sarpsborg Stadion, Sarpsborg, Norway  Bulgaria

1–0

11–0

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying
23.

2–0

24.

4–0

25.

6–0

26.

7–0

27. 30 August 2012 East End Park, Edinburgh, Scotland  Scotland

1–1

2–2

Friendly
28.

2–1

29. 15 September 2012 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway  Belgium

2–0

3–2

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying
30. 7 May 2014 Tønsberg Gressbane, Tønsberg, Norway  Portugal

2–0

2–0

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA)
31. 14 June 2014 Brann Stadion, Bergen, Norway  Greece

5–0

6–0

32. 18 June 2014 Estádio Marcolino de Castro, Santa Maria da Feira, Portugal  Portugal

1–0

2–0

33. 13 September 2014 Niko Dovana Stadium, Durres, Albania  Albania

1–0

11–0

34.

4–0

35.

8–0

36. 25 November 2014 Randaberg Stadion, Randaberg, Norway  New Zealand

1–1

1–1

Friendly
37. 13 January 2015 La Manga, Spain  Sweden

1–0

2–3

38.

2–0

39. 9 March 2015 Estádio Municipal, Albufeira, Portugal   Switzerland

2–2

2–2

2015 Algarve Cup
22 June 2019 Allianz Riviera, Nice, France  Australia

1–0

1–1

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
Norway squads

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