Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award is awarded periodically by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences at the Governors Awards ceremonies to "creative producers, whose bodies of work reflect a consistently high quality of motion picture production." The award is named for Irving Thalberg, legendary head of the Production Division of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, who developed the company's reputation for sophisticated films. The trophy itself is a bust of Thalberg rather than the familiar "Oscar" statuette. However, it is still counted as an "honorary Oscar". The award was established in 1937 and was first presented at the 10th Academy Awards, in March 1938. There have been 39 statuettes awarded to date.

Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award
Awarded forcreative producers, whose bodies of work reflect a consistently high quality of motion picture production.
CountryUnited States
Presented byAcademy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS)
First awarded1938
Websiteoscars.org

List of recipients

Year Image Honorees Ref.
1937 Darryl F. Zanuck 1964 Darryl F. Zanuck
1938 Hal B. Wallis
1939 DavidSelznick David O. Selznick
1941 Walt Disney 1946 Walt Disney
1942 Sidney Franklin - Jun 1920 MPN Sidney Franklin
1943 Hal B. Wallis
1944 Darryl F. Zanuck 1964 Darryl F. Zanuck
1946 Samuel Goldwyn - Jul 1919 EH Samuel Goldwyn
1948 Jerry Wald
1950 Darryl F. Zanuck 1964 Darryl F. Zanuck
1951 Arthur Freed
1952 Demille - c1920 Cecil B. DeMille
1953 George Stevens with Oscar for Giant George Stevens
1956 Buddy Adler
1958 Jack Warner portrait copy Jack L. Warner
1961 Stanley Kramer Stanley Kramer
1963 Sam Spiegel
1965 William Wyler portrait William Wyler
1966 Robert wise 1990 Robert Wise
1967 Alfred Hitchcock by Jack Mitchell Alfred Hitchcock
1970 Ingmar Bergman Smultronstallet Ingmar Bergman
1973 Lawrence Weingarten
1975 Mervyn LeRoy - 1958 Mervyn LeRoy
1976 Pandro S. Berman 1953 Pandro S. Berman
1977 Walter Mirisch
1979 Ray Stark
1981 Albert Cubby Broccoli 1976 crop Albert R. Broccoli
1986 Steven Spielberg by Gage Skidmore Steven Spielberg
1987 Gloria Swanson & Billy Wilder - ca. 1950 Billy Wilder
1990 David Brown
Richard D. Zanuck (cropped)
1991 George Lucas cropped 2009 George Lucas
1994 Clint Eastwood at 2010 New York Film Festival Clint Eastwood
1996 Saul Zaentz
1998 Norman Jewison CFC in LA 37 Norman Jewison
1999 Warren Beatty - 1975 Warren Beatty
2000 Dino de laurentiis crop Dino De Laurentiis
2009 John Calley
2010 Francis Ford Coppola 2011 CC Francis Ford Coppola
2018 Kathleen Kennedy by Gage Skidmore Kathleen Kennedy
Frank Marshall Deauville 2012

Other nominees

Other nominees for the 11th Academy Awards (the only year for which non-winning nominations were announced):

See also

  • Category:Recipients of the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

External links

10th Academy Awards

The 10th Academy Awards were originally scheduled for March 3, 1938, but due to the Los Angeles flood of 1938 were held on March 10, 1938, at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California. It was hosted by Bob Burns.

16th Academy Awards

The 16th Academy Awards, in 1944, was the first Oscar ceremony held at a large public venue, Grauman's Chinese Theatre. Free passes were given out to men and women in uniform. Originating on KFWB, the complete ceremony was internationally broadcast by CBS Radio via shortwave. Jack Benny served as master of ceremonies for the event, which lasted fewer than 30 minutes.The Tom and Jerry cartoon series won its first Oscar this year for The Yankee Doodle Mouse after two failed nominations in a row. It would go on to win another six Oscars, including three in a row for the next three years, and gained a total of 13 nominations.

For the first time, supporting actors and actresses took home full-size statuettes, instead of smaller-sized awards mounted on a plaque.For Whom the Bell Tolls was the third film to receive nominations in all four acting categories.

This was the last year until 2009 to have 10 nominations for Best Picture; The Ox-Bow Incident is, as of 2018, the last film to be nominated solely in that category.

19th Academy Awards

The 19th Academy Awards continued a trend through the late-1940s of the Oscar voters honoring films about contemporary social issues. The Best Years of Our Lives concerns the lives of three returning veterans from three branches of military service as they adjust to life on the home front after World War II.

The Academy awarded Harold Russell—a World War II veteran who had lost both hands in the war and who, despite not being an actor, portrayed Homer Parrish in The Best Years of Our Lives—an Honorary Academy Award for "bringing hope and courage to his fellow veterans," believing he would not win the Best Supporting Actor award for which he was nominated. As it happened, he did win the competitive award, making him the only person to receive two Oscars for the same performance.

This was the first time since the 2nd Academy Awards that every category had at most 5 nominations.

23rd Academy Awards

The 23rd Academy Awards Ceremony awarded Oscars for the best in films in 1950. All About Eve received 14 Oscar nominations, beating the previous record of 13 set by Gone with the Wind.

Sunset Boulevard became the second film with nominations in every acting category not to win a single one (after My Man Godfrey in 1936). This would not happen again until American Hustle was shut out at the 86th Academy Awards.

All About Eve was the second film, after Mrs. Miniver (1942), to receive five acting nominations. It also became the first to receive multiple nominations in two acting categories, and the first (and, to date, only) film to receive four female acting nominations--two each for Best Actress in a Leading Role and Best Actress in a Supporting Role. None was successful, losing to Judy Holliday in Born Yesterday and Josephine Hull in Harvey, respectively.

24th Academy Awards

The 24th Academy Awards honored the best in film in 1951, as recognized by the American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Best Picture was awarded to An American in Paris, which, like A Place in the Sun, received six Academy Awards. A Streetcar Named Desire won four Oscars, including three of the acting awards. The film's only unsuccessful acting nomination was that of Marlon Brando, whose performance as Stanley Kowalski was later considered one of the most influential of modern film acting.Humphrey Bogart was the last man born in the 19th century to win a leading role Oscar.

An American in Paris became the second color film to win Best Picture, after 1939's Gone with the Wind.

31st Academy Awards

The 31st Academy Awards ceremony was held on April 6, 1959, to honor the best films of 1958. The show's producer, Jerry Wald, started cutting numbers from the show to make sure it ran on time. He cut too much material and the ceremony ended 20 minutes early, leaving Jerry Lewis to attempt to fill in the time. Eventually, NBC cut to a re-run of a sports show.

The film Gigi won nine Oscars, breaking the previous record of eight (set by Gone with the Wind and tied by From Here to Eternity and On the Waterfront). It would be short-lived, however, as Ben-Hur broke the record with eleven Oscars the following year.

Gigi was the last film until The Last Emperor (1987) to win Best Picture without any acting nominations. It also had the biggest clean sweep at the time, winning all nine of its nominations, a record that would be tied by The Last Emperor. This record was broken in 2003 when The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King won all 11 of its nominations.

The ceremony was hosted by an ensemble of actors: Jerry Lewis, Mort Sahl, Tony Randall, Bob Hope, David Niven, and Laurence Olivier. Niven won Best Actor that night, making him the only host in Oscar history to have won an award during the same ceremony.

34th Academy Awards

The 34th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1961, were held on April 9, 1962, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope; this was the 13th time Hope hosted the Oscars.

Legendary filmmaker Federico Fellini received his first Best Director nomination for his film La Dolce Vita, though the movie itself failed to garner a nomination for Best Picture.

Sophia Loren became the first thespian to win an acting Oscar for a non-English-speaking role as well as only the second person ever to win the Best Actress for a film with singular nomination, a feat that wouldn't occur again until twenty-seven years later, in 1989, when Jodie Foster won Best Actress for her role in The Accused, the film's only nomination.

49th Academy Awards

The 49th Academy Awards were presented Monday, March 28, 1977, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California. The ceremonies were presided over by Richard Pryor, Ellen Burstyn, Jane Fonda, and Warren Beatty.

This Academy Awards ceremony is notable for Peter Finch becoming the first posthumous winner of an Oscar for acting, a feat matched only by fellow Australian Heath Ledger 32 years later; Finch had suffered a fatal heart attack in mid-January. Beatrice Straight set another record by becoming the actor with the shortest performance ever in a film to win an acting Oscar, with only five minutes and two seconds of screen-time in Network. Network, along with All the President's Men, were the two biggest champs of the ceremony with four Oscars each, but Best Picture and Best Director ultimately went to Rocky.

Piper Laurie was nominated for Best Supporting Actress for Carrie (1976), her first role since her Best Actress-nominated performance in The Hustler (1961), thus being nominated for two consecutive roles, fifteen years apart.

Network became the second film (after A Streetcar Named Desire) to win three acting Oscars, and the last, as of the 90th Academy Awards, to receive five acting nominations. It was also the eleventh of fifteen films (to date) to receive nominations in all four acting categories.

This year's Academy Awards is also notable for the first ever female nominee for Best Director, Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties. Barbra Streisand received her second Academy Award, composing music for the love theme "Evergreen", the first woman to be honored as a composer, and as of the 90th Academy Awards, the only person to win Academy Awards for both acting and songwriting.

No honorary awards were given this year.

ABC had the Oscars from 1960–70 and had regained them for 1976. For the second straight year, the ceremony was scheduled directly opposite the NCAA championship basketball game on NBC, won by Marquette in Al McGuire's final game as head coach.

50th Academy Awards

The 50th Academy Awards were held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California on April 3, 1978. The ceremonies were presided over by Bob Hope, who hosted the awards for the nineteenth and last time.

Two of the year's biggest winners were Star Wars, which swept the technical categories by winning 6 out of its 10 nominations and a Special Achievement for Sound Effects Editing, and Annie Hall, winning 4 out of 5 nominations, including Best Picture, Best Actress and Best Director. The awards show was also notable for a very politically charged acceptance speech by Vanessa Redgrave.

The Turning Point set the record for the most nominations without a win (11), previously held by Peyton Place and The Little Foxes, which each had 9 nominations with no wins. This record, later tied by The Color Purple, still stands as of 2018.

Annie Hall was the last Best Picture winner to be nominated for just five awards until The Departed 29 years later in 2006.

Jason Robards became the fourth actor to win back-to-back Oscars, following Luise Rainer, Spencer Tracy, and Katharine Hepburn.

For the only time to date, both Best Actor and Best Actress winners won for roles in two different romantic comedies.

The animated opening sequence, as well as promos for the Awards show, were designed by British graphic designer Harry Marks, who outsourced the animated sequences to Robert Abel and Associates. Marks also designed animated sequences for the top nominated categories, which weren't used for the final telecast.

52nd Academy Awards

The 52nd Academy Awards were presented April 14, 1980, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Johnny Carson who, in noting the long duration of the production, joked that President Jimmy Carter was working hard for their "release" from the ceremonies, a clear reference to the Iranian hostage crisis.

Among the nominees for Best Supporting Actor were 8 year-old Justin Henry—the youngest Best Supporting Actor nominee ever—and 79-year-old Melvyn Douglas. This was the largest age difference between two competing actors in Oscar history until 2013. Their age difference was partially the reason why Douglas did not attend the Oscars that night, despite winning the award. Henry was nominated for Kramer vs. Kramer, which out of its eight other nominations, finished with five awards, including Best Picture, Best Director for Robert Benton, and Best Actor for Dustin Hoffman.

54th Academy Awards

The 54th Academy Awards were presented March 29, 1982, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Johnny Carson.

Chariots of Fire was the surprise winner (with a leading 12 nominations, Reds had been expected to win) of the Best Picture Oscar. It was the first time in 13 years that a British film won the Academy's top honor. The next year's winner, Gandhi, was also a British production.

Henry Fonda won his only competitive Oscar this year, as Best Actor for On Golden Pond. At 76 years of age, Fonda became the oldest winner in the Best Actor category in Academy history. The only other nomination he received in his career was Best Actor for his performance in The Grapes of Wrath 41 years earlier – a record gap between acting nominations. His co-star, Katharine Hepburn, won her fourth Best Actress award, extending her own record for the most Best Actress wins by any actress.

This year's nominations also marked the second time (after 1967) that three different films were nominated for the "Big Five" Academy Awards: Best Picture, Director, Actor, Actress, and Screenplay. The three films were On Golden Pond, Atlantic City and Reds. However, none of them won the Best Picture prize, losing to Chariots of Fire. This also marked the first year that the award for Best Makeup was presented; the winner was Rick Baker for his work on An American Werewolf in London.

This was the last year until the 2005 Oscars where all five Best Picture nominations were also nominated for Best Director. Reds was the last film to gain nominations in all four acting categories until Silver Linings Playbook matched that feat at the 85th Academy Awards ceremony in 2013. Facilitated in part by their advanced ages at the time (77, 76, 74 and a "young" 56), this is also the most recent ceremony (as of the 2017 presentation of the 89th Academy Awards) for which the four acting award winners are all now deceased – though two of the four did live into their late 90s.

Chariots of Fire became the last film to win Best Picture and not win for directing

until Driving Miss Daisy in 1990.

Similar to 1976 and 1977, these Oscars were scheduled directly opposite the NCAA basketball championship game, which this year was broadcast on CBS. Beginning in 1983, NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Game would take place on the Monday following the Academy Awards.

Cecil B. DeMille

Cecil Blount DeMille (; August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was an American filmmaker. Between 1914 and 1958, he made a total of 70 features, both silent and sound films. He is acknowledged as a founding father of the cinema of the United States and the most commercially successful producer-director in film history. His films were distinguished by their epic scale and by his cinematic showmanship. He made silent films of every genre: social dramas, comedies, Westerns, farces, morality plays, and historical pageants.

DeMille began his career as a stage actor in 1900. He later moved to writing and directing stage productions, some with Jesse Lasky, who was then a vaudeville producer. DeMille's first film, The Squaw Man (1914), was also the first feature film shot in Hollywood. Its interracial love story made it a phenomenal hit and it "put Hollywood on the map". The continued success of his productions led to the founding of Paramount Pictures with Lasky and Adolph Zukor. His first biblical epic, The Ten Commandments (1923), was both a critical and financial success; it held the Paramount revenue record for twenty-five years.In 1927, he directed The King of Kings, a biography of Jesus of Nazareth, which was acclaimed for its sensitivity and reached more than 800 million viewers. The Sign of the Cross (1932) was the first sound film to integrate all aspects of cinematic technique. Cleopatra (1934) was his first film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. After more than thirty years in film production, DeMille reached the pinnacle of his career with Samson and Delilah (1949), a biblical epic which did "an all-time record business". Along with biblical and historical narratives, he also directed films oriented toward "neo-naturalism", which tried to portray the laws of man fighting the forces of nature.He went on to receive his first nomination for the Academy Award for Best Director for his circus drama The Greatest Show on Earth (1952), which won both the Academy Award for Best Picture and the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama. His last and most famous film, The Ten Commandments (1956), also a Best Picture Academy Award nominee, is currently the seventh-highest-grossing film of all time, adjusted for inflation. In addition to his Best Picture Award, he received an Academy Honorary Award for his film contributions, the Palme d'Or (posthumously) for Union Pacific, a DGA Award for Lifetime Achievement, and the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award. He was also the first recipient of the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, which was later named in his honor.

Dino De Laurentiis

Agostino "Dino" De Laurentiis (Italian: [ˈdiːno de lauˈrɛnti.is]; 8 August 1919 – 10 November 2010) was an Italian-American film producer. Along with Carlo Ponti, he was one of the producers who brought Italian cinema to the international scene at the end of World War II. He produced or co-produced more than 500 films, of which 38 were nominated for Academy Awards. He also had a brief acting career in the late 1930s and early 1940s.

Governors Awards

The Governors Awards presentation is an annual award ceremony hosted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), at the Grand Ballroom of the Hollywood and Highland Center, in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles, California. Three awards that signify lifetime achievement within the film industry – the Academy Honorary Award, the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, and the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award – are presented at this ceremony. The first Governors Awards ceremony was held on November 14, 2009. Prior to this, these three awards were formally presented during the main Academy Awards ceremony, which now conducts a short mention and appearance of the awards recipients after displaying a montage of the Governors Awards presentation. In the years since, the awards have gained prominence as a major red-carpet destination and industry event.

John Calley

John Nicholas Calley (July 8, 1930 – September 13, 2011) was an American film studio executive and producer. He was quite influential during his years at Warner Bros. (where he worked from 1968 to 1981) and "produced a film a month, on average, including commercial successes like The Exorcist and Superman." During his seven years at Sony Pictures starting in 1996, five of which he was chairman and chief executive, he was credited with "reinvigorat[ing]" that major film studio.

List of Nordic Academy Award winners and nominees

This is a list of Academy Award winners and nominees from the Nordic countries. This list is current as of the 87th Academy Awards ceremony held on February 22, 2015. The list may be incomplete.

Ray Stark

Ray Stark (October 3, 1915 – January 17, 2004) was one of the most successful and prolific independent film producers in postwar Hollywood. Highly tenacious and intelligent, Stark's background as a literary and theatrical agent groomed him to produce some of the most dynamic and profitable films of the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, such as The World of Suzie Wong (1961), West Side Story (1961), The Misfits (1961), Lolita (1962), The Night of The Iguana (1964), Reflections in a Golden Eye (1967), Funny Girl (1968), The Goodbye Girl (1977), The Toy (1982), Annie (1982), and Steel Magnolias (1989).

In addition to his roster of films, Stark formed relationships with various directors and writers throughout his inspired career. Stark made eight films with Herbert Ross, five with John Huston, and three with Sydney Pollack. Additionally, Stark's 18-year partnership with playwright Neil Simon yielded 11 films between the duo, including The Goodbye Girl (1977) and The Sunshine Boys (1975). In 1980, the Motion Picture Academy awarded him the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award for a lifetime of achievement in film.

Samuel Goldwyn

Samuel Goldwyn (born Szmuel Gelbfisz; Yiddish: שמואל געלבפֿיש‎; c. July, 1879 – January 31, 1974), also known as Samuel Goldfish, was a Polish-American film producer. He was most well known for being the founding contributor and executive of several motion picture studios in Hollywood. His awards include the 1973 Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1947, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1958.

Walter Mirisch

Walter Mortimer Mirisch (born November 8, 1921) is an American film producer. He is President and Executive Head of Production of The Mirisch Corporation, an independent film production company, which he formed in 1957 with his brothers, Marvin and Harold. He won the Academy Award for Best Picture as producer of In the Heat of the Night (1967).

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