Irish Meusel

Emil Frederick "Irish" Meusel (June 9, 1893 – March 1, 1963) was an American baseball left fielder.

He was first signed with the Washington Senators in 1914 and played one game. After a tour in the minor league, he was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1918. He played four years for the Phillies, averaging over .300 in three of those years.

Midway through the 1921 season, he was traded to the New York Giants. His subsequent play helped the Giants erase a 7½-game deficit to edge out the Pittsburgh Pirates and claim the pennant. He finished the year with a career-best .343 batting average. The Giants went on to win the 1921 World Series over the New York Yankees. His brother, Bob Meusel, played for the Yankees.

He appeared in four consecutive World Series for the Giants: 1921, 1922, 1923, and 1924.

In 1922, Meusel compiled 204 hits and was second in the league with 132 RBIs, both career highs. In 1923, he led the National League with 125 RBIs while scoring a career-high 102 runs. In 1925 he batted .328 with 111 RBIs and 21 home runs, a personal best. His career average is .310 with 819 RBIs. His final year was with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1927.

He died on March 1, 1963.

Irish Meusel
Irish Meusel
Left fielder
Born: June 9, 1893
Oakland, California
Died: March 1, 1963 (aged 69)
Long Beach, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
October 1, 1914, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
July 22, 1927, for the Brooklyn Robins
MLB statistics
Batting average.310
Home runs106
Runs batted in819
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1893 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1893 throughout the world.

1918 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1918 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1919 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1919 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1920 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1920 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1921 New York Giants season

The 1921 New York Giants season was the franchise's 39th season, which culminated in the Giants defeating the New York Yankees in the World Series.

1921 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1921 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1921 World Series

The much-anticipated 1921 World Series featured John McGraw's New York Giants, dedicated practitioners of the dead-ball era's "inside game", and the New York Yankees, who relied on the "power game" exemplified by Babe Ruth, who was coming off of what was arguably his best year ever statistically. This was the first World Series appearance by the Yankees, who have gone on to play in the Series a record 40 times. The 1921 Series was a closely contested matchup that ended on a double play featuring a baserunning miscue.

1922 New York Giants season

The 1922 New York Giants season was the franchise's 40th season. The team finished in first place in the National League with a 93-61 record. The Giants won their second consecutive World Series, defeating the New York Yankees in five games (Game 2 was a 3-3 tie) without a loss.

1923 Major League Baseball season

The 1923 Major League Baseball season.

1923 New York Giants season

The 1923 New York Giants season was the franchise's 41st season. The Giants won the National League pennant with a 95-58 record. The team went on to lose to the New York Yankees in the 1923 World Series, four games to two.

1923 World Series

In the 1923 World Series, the New York Yankees beat the New York Giants in six games. This would be the first of the Yankees' 27 World Series championships (as of 2018). The series was not played in a 2–3–2 format: as with the previous two Series (where both clubs had shared the Polo Grounds) the home field alternated each game, though this time it involved switching ballparks, as the first Yankee Stadium had opened this season.

1924 New York Giants season

The 1924 New York Giants season was the franchise's 42nd season. The team finished first in the National League with a record of 93–60, winning the NL pennant for the fourth consecutive season, a record that still stands, as of 2016. They went on to the World Series, losing to the Washington Senators in seven games.

1925 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1925 New York Giants season was the franchise's 43rd season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 86-66 record, 8½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1927 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1927 Brooklyn Robins had another bad year. They tied a National League record on May 21 by using five pitchers in the eighth inning.

1931 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1931 New York Giants season was the franchise's 49th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 87-65 record, 13 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

Bob Meusel

Robert William Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American baseball left and right fielder who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for eleven seasons from 1920 through 1930, all but the last for the New York Yankees. He was best known as a member of the Yankees' championship teams of the 1920s, nicknamed the "Murderers' Row", during which time the team won its first six American League (AL) pennants and first three World Series titles.

Meusel, noted for his strong outfield throwing arm, batted fifth behind Baseball Hall of Famers Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. In 1925, he became the second Yankee, after Ruth, to lead the AL in the following offensive categories: home runs (33), runs batted in (138) and extra base hits (79). Nicknamed "Long Bob" because of his 6-foot, 3 inch (1.91 m) stature, Meusel batted .313 or better in seven of his first eight seasons, finishing with a .309 career average; his 1,005 RBI during the 1920s were the fourth most by any major leaguer, and trailed only Harry Heilmann's total of 1,131 among AL right-handed hitters. Meusel ended his career in 1930 with the Cincinnati Reds. He hit for the cycle three times, and was the second of four major leaguers to accomplish this feat as many as three times during a career.

His older brother, Emil "Irish" Meusel, was a star outfielder in the National League (NL) during the same period, primarily for the New York Giants.

Irish (name)

Irish is a given name and a surname.

Notable people bearing this name include:

As surname:

Carolyn Tanner Irish (born 1940), Episcopal Bishop

Frank Irish (1918–1997), English cricketer who played for Somerset and Devon

Frederick M. Irish (1870–1941), Arizona football coach 1896–1906

George Irish, Montserratian academic, professor of Caribbean studies

Jack Irish, protagonist in a series of novels by Peter Temple

Mark Irish (born 1981), English rugby player

Ned Irish (1905–1982), American basketball promoter

Ronald Irish (born 1913), Australian executive

William Irish, pseudonym of Cornell Woolrich (1903–1968), American writer

As given name:

Irish Bob Murphy

Irish McCalla

Irish Meusel

Irish McIlveen

Meusel

Meusel is a surname. Notable people with the name include:

Andreas Meusel (1514–1581), German Lutheran theologian

Bob Meusel (1896 –1977), American baseball left and right fielder

Irish Meusel (1893–1963), American baseball left fielder

Johann Georg Meusel (1743–1820), German bibliographer, lexicographer and historian

Slide, Kelly, Slide

Slide, Kelly, Slide is a 1927 American comedy film, released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, directed by Edward Sedgwick, and starring William Haines, Sally O'Neil, and Harry Carey.

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