Iran Standard Time

Iran Standard Time (IRST) or Iran Time (IT) is the time zone used in Iran. Iran uses a UTC offset UTC+03:30. IRST is defined by the 52.5 degrees east meridian, the same meridian which defines the Iranian calendar and is the official meridian of Iran.

Between 2005 and 2008, by decree of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran did not observe daylight saving time (called Iran Daylight Time or IRDT).[1][2] It was reintroduced from 21 March 2008.

Time Zones of the Middle East
Time in the Middle East
    UTC+02:00 Eastern European Time
    UTC+02:00

UTC+03:00
Eastern European Time /
Israel Standard Time /
Palestine Standard Time
Eastern European Summer Time /
Israel Summer Time /
Palestine Summer Time
    UTC+03:00 Turkey Time
Arabia Standard Time
    UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time
Iran Daylight Time
    UTC+04:00 Gulf Standard Time
Light colors indicate where standard time is observed all year; dark colors indicate where daylight savings is observed.

Daylight Saving Time transitions

The dates of DST transitions in Iran are based on the Solar Hijri calendar, the official calendar of Iran, which is in turn based on the March equinox (Nowruz) as determined by astronomical calculation at the meridian for Iran Standard Time (52.5°E or GMT+3.5h). This results in the unusual situation wherein the dates of DST transitions don't fall on the same weekday each year as they do in most other countries.

DST starts in Iran at 24:00 on 1 Farvardin, which corresponds to either 20 or 21 March in the Gregorian calendar, depending on the precise timing of the equinox. (This is equivalent to 00:00 on 2 Farvardin, either 21 or 22 March.) Clocks move forward at that time to 01:00 on 2 Farvardin (21 or 22 March). This spring change takes place at the end of the day of Nowruz, which is the Iranian New Year's Day[3] and the most important festival in Iranian culture.

DST likewise ends in Iran at 24:00 on 30 Shahrivar, which corresponds to either 20 or 21 September. (Equivalently, at 00:00 on 31 Shahrivar, either 21 or 22 September). Clocks move backward to 23:00 on 30 Shahrivar (20 or 21 September).[4][5]

Recent and upcoming dates

Year[6] DST Start DST End
2017 Wed, Mar 22, 00:00 Fri, Sep 22, 00:00
2018 Thu, Mar 22, 00:00 Sat, Sep 22, 00:00
2019 Fri, Mar 22, 00:00 Sun, Sep 22, 00:00
2020 Sat, Mar 21, 00:00 Mon, Sep 21, 00:00
2021 Mon, Mar 22, 00:00 Wed, Sep 22, 00:00
2022 Tue, Mar 22, 00:00 Thu, Sep 22, 00:00
2023 Wed, Mar 22, 00:00 Fri, Sep 22, 00:00

Time zone changes

Period in use Time offset from GMT Name of Time
1800 – 1945 UTC+03:25:44 Tehran Mean Time (TMT)
1946 – 1977 UTC+03:30 Iran Standard Time (IRST)
1977 – 1978 UTC+04:00
UTC+05:00
Iran Standard Time (IRST)
Iran Daylight Time (IRDT)
1979 – 1980 UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time (IRST)
Iran Daylight Time (IRDT)
1981 – 1990 UTC+03:30 Iran Standard Time (IRST)
1991 – 2005 UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time (IRST)
Iran Daylight Time (IRDT)
2006 – 2007 UTC+03:30 Iran Standard Time (IRST)
2008 – present UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time (IRST)
Iran Daylight Time (IRDT)

IANA time zone database

The IANA time zone database contains one zone for Iran in the file zone.tab, named Asia/Tehran.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Iran will not observe DST". Presstv.ir. 20 March 2007. Retrieved 9 May 2010.
  2. ^ "Time zone and daylight saving time for Iran – Tehran between 2010 and 2019". Timeanddate.com. Retrieved 9 May 2010.
  3. ^ "Culture of Iran: No-Rooz, The Iranian New Year at Present Times". www.iranchamber.com. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  4. ^ Roozbeh Pournader (15 March 2003). "Iran daylight saving time correction". Retrieved 1 December 2018.
  5. ^ tz database (30 November 2018). "asia file, lines 1278–1299". Retrieved 1 December 2018.
  6. ^ "Time Changes in Tehran over the years".
1997 Ardabil earthquake

The 1997 Ardabil earthquake occurred on 28 February with a moment magnitude of 6.1 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VIII (Severe). The strike-slip earthquake occurred in northern Iran near the city of Ardabil.

2003 Bam earthquake

The 2003 Bam earthquake struck the Kerman province of southeastern Iran at 01:56 UTC (5:26 AM Iran Standard Time) on December 26. The shock had a moment magnitude of 6.6 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of IX (Violent). The earthquake was particularly destructive in Bam, with the death toll amounting to at least 26,271 people and injuring up to 30,000. The effects of the earthquake were exacerbated by the use of mud brick as the standard construction medium; many of the area's structures did not comply with earthquake regulations set in 1989.

Following the earthquake the U.S. offered direct humanitarian assistance to Iran and in return the state promised to comply with an agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency which supports greater monitoring of its nuclear interests. In total a reported 44 countries sent in personnel to assist in relief operations and 60 countries offered assistance.

Following the earthquake, the Iranian government seriously considered moving the capital of Tehran in fear of an earthquake occurring there. The earthquake had a psychological impact on many of the victims for years afterwards. A new institutional framework in Iran was established to address problems of urban planning and to reconstruct the city of Bam in compliance with strict seismic regulations. This process marked a turning point, as government ministers and international organizations collaborated under this framework with local engineers and local people to organize the systematic rebuilding of the city.

2012 East Azerbaijan earthquakes

The 2012 East Azerbaijan earthquakes – also known as the Ahar earthquakes – occurred on 11 August 2012, at 16:53 Iran Standard Time, near the cities of Ahar and Varzaqan in Iran's East Azerbaijan Province, approximately 60 kilometers (37 miles) from Tabriz. They comprised a doublet separated by eleven minutes, with magnitudes of 6.4 and 6.3 Mww. At least 306 people died and more than 3,000 others were injured, primarily in the rural and mountainous areas to the northeast of Tabriz (though 45 died in the city of Ahar). The shocks were felt in Armenia and Azerbaijan, though no major damage was reported.

2017 Iran–Iraq earthquake

On 12 November 2017 at 18:18 UTC (21:48 Iran Standard Time, 21:18 Arabia Standard Time), an earthquake with a moment magnitude of 7.3 occurred on the Iran–Iraq border, with the Iraqi Kurdish city of Halabja, and the Kurdish dominated places of Ezgeleh, Salas-e Babajani County, Kermanshah Province in Iran, closest to the epicentre, 30 kilometres (19 mi) south of the city of Halabja, Iraqi Kurdistan.It was felt as far away as Israel and the United Arab Emirates. With at least 630 people killed (mostly in Iraq's Kurdish Halabja area and the Iranian Kurdish dominated province of Kermanshah), and more than 8,100 injured, as well as many more unaccounted for, it was the deadliest earthquake of 2017.

Bam, Iran

Bam (Persian: بم‎) is a city and capital of Bam County, Kerman Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 73,823, in 19,572 families.The modern Iranian city of Bam surrounds the Bam citadel. Before the 2003 earthquake the official population count of the city was roughly 43,000. There are various opinions about the date and reasons for the foundation of the citadel. Economically and commercially, Bam occupied a very important place in the region and was famed for its textiles and clothes. Ibn Hawqal (943–977), the Arab traveller and geographer, wrote of Bam in his book Surat-ul-`ard (The Earth-figure):

Over there they weave excellent, beautiful and long-lasting cotton cloths which are sent to places all over the world There they also make excellent clothes, each of which costs around 30 dinars; these are sold in Khorasan, Iraq and Egypt.The ancient citadel of Arg-é Bam has a history dating back around 2,000 years ago, to the Parthian Empire (248 BC–224 AD), but most buildings were built during the Safavid dynasty. The city was largely abandoned due to an Afghan invasion in 1722. Subsequently, after the city had gradually been re-settled, it was abandoned a second time due to an attack by invaders from Shiraz. It was also used for a time as an army barracks.

The modern city of Bam has gradually developed as an agricultural and industrial centre, and until the 2003 earthquake was experiencing rapid growth. In particular, the city is known for its dates and citrus fruit, irrigated by a substantial network of qanats. The city also benefited from tourism, with an increasing number of people visiting the ancient citadel in recent years.

Eastern European Summer Time

Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+03:00 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. It is used as a summer daylight saving time in some European and Middle Eastern countries, which makes it the same as Arabia Standard Time, East Africa Time and Moscow Time. During the winter periods, Eastern European Time (UTC+02:00) is used.

Since 1996 European Summer Time has been observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October; previously the rules were not uniform across the European Union.

Eastern European Time

Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+02:00 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. The zone uses daylight saving time, so that it uses UTC+03:00 during the summer.

A number of African countries use UTC+02:00 all year long, where it is called Central Africa Time (CAT), although Egypt and Libya also use the term Eastern European Time.

Field hockey at the 1974 Asian Games

The Field hockey events at the 1974 Asian Games were held in Tehran, Iran between 6 September and 15 September 1974.

Pakistan won the gold medal after beating India in the gold medal match.

Iranian calendars

The Iranian calendars (Persian: گاه‌شماری ایرانی‎ Gâh-Shomâriye Irâni) are a succession of calendars invented or used for over two millennia in Iran also known as Persia. One of the longest chronological records in human history, the Iranian calendar has been modified time and time again during its history to suit administrative, climatic, and religious purposes.

As one of the few calendars designed in the era of accurate positional astronomy, the Iranian calendar uses a very complex leap year structure which makes it the most accurate solar calendar in use today.The modern Iranian calendar is currently the official calendar in Iran. It begins at the midnight nearest to the instant of the vernal equinox as determined by astronomical calculations for the Iran Standard Time meridian (52.5°E or GMT+3.5h). It is, therefore, an observation-based calendar, unlike the Gregorian, which is rule-based.The Iranian year usually begins within a day of 21 March of the Gregorian calendar. A short table of year correspondences between the Persian and Gregorian calendars is provided below.

Israel Standard Time

Israel Standard Time (IST) (Hebrew: שעון ישראל‎ Sha'on Yisra'el, lit. "Israel Time") is the standard time zone in Israel. It is two hours ahead of UTC (UTC+02:00).

List of time zone abbreviations

This is a list of time zone abbreviations.

Salas-e Babajani County

Salas-e Babajani County or Salasi Bawajani (Kurdish: شارستانی سەلاسی باوەجانی‎ Persian: شهرستان ثلاث باباجانی‎) is a county in Kermanshah Province in Iran. The capital of the county is Tazehabad. At the 2006 census, the county's population was 37,056, in 7,734 families. The county is subdivided into two districts: the Central District and Ezgeleh District. The county has two cities: Tazehabad and Ezgeleh.

The spoken language in the city is Kurdish, but the language which is used in schools and offices is Farsi, since the official language in Iran is Persian Almost everyone in the city are fluent in Farsi.

Solar Hijri calendar

The Solar Hijri calendar (Persian: گاه‌شماری هجری خورشیدی‎, translit. gāh-shomāri-ye hejri-ye khorshidi; Pashto: لمريز لېږدیز کلیز‎), also called the Solar Hejri calendar or Shamsi Hijri calendar, and abbreviated as SH, is the official calendar of Iran and Afghanistan. It begins on the March equinox (Nowruz) as determined by astronomical calculation for the Iran Standard Time meridian (52.5°E, UTC+03:30) and has years of 365 or 366 days.

Its determination of the start of each year is astronomically accurate year-to-year as opposed to the more fixed Gregorian calendar or "Common Era calendar" which, averaged out, has the same year length, achieving the same accuracy (a more simply patterned calendar of 365 days for three consecutive years plus an extra day in the next year, save for exceptions to the latter in three out of every four centuries). The start of the year and its number of days remain fixed to one of the two equinoxes, the astronomically important days which have the same duration of day as night. It results in less variability of all celestial bodies when comparing a specific calendar date from one year to others.Each of the twelve months corresponds with a zodiac sign. The first six months have 31 days, the next five have 30 days, and the last month has 29 days in usual years but 30 days in leap years. The New Year's Day always falls on the March equinox.

Time in Turkey

Time in Turkey is given by UTC+03:00 year-round. This time is also called Turkey Time (TRT) or Türkiye Saati İle (TSİ). The time is currently same as in the Arabia Standard Time, Further-eastern European Time and Moscow Time zone. Turkey Time was adopted by the Turkish government on September 8, 2016. It was also in use in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus until it reverted to EET in October 2017.

Time in Asia
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