Ion Life

Ion Life is an American digital broadcast television network that is owned by Ion Media.

Originally from its February 2007 launch, Ion Life had primarily featured lifestyle programming, consisting of shows pertaining to subjects such as health and wellness, cooking, home decor and travel. In 2019 with expanded cable carriage, Ion Media switched the network's schedule to match the main format of Ion Television, featuring day-long marathons of one series per day, along with a late-night block of paid programming.

Ion Life is carried mainly as a digital multicast service on Ion Media Networks-owned stations as well as select Ion Television affiliates (and is primarily placed on the third subchannel); its base national feed is also available on select cable and satellite providers. In a few select markets, Ion Life has main channel placement, allowing it must-carry coverage on local cable and satellite services.

Ion Life
Ionlifelogo
LaunchedFebruary 19, 2007
Owned byIon Media
Picture format480i (SDTV)
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Broadcast areaNationwide (via OTA digital TV)
(U.S.coverage: 63%)[1]
HeadquartersWest Palm Beach, Florida
Sister channel(s)Ion Television
Qubo
WebsiteIonLife.com
Availability
Terrestrial
Affiliated with Ion Television owned-and-operated and affiliated stations in most marketsSee list of affiliates
(channel carriage varies depending on the station, although the network is usually carried as a third digital subchannel)
Satellite
Dish NetworkChannel 1000
Cable
National feed available on select U.S. cable systemsConsult your local cable provider or program listings source for channel availability
IPTV
AT&T U-verseChannel 468
Verizon FiOSChannel 492

Background

The network launched on February 19, 2007, focusing on generalized health and lifestyle programming; the network replaced a three-hour timeshift channel which depending on geographical location, carried what was then called i: Independent Television's Eastern or Pacific time zone feeds.[2] Ion Media Networks originally planned to name the network "iHealth" to match i's name, until it was subsequently rebranded as Ion Television in September of that year.[3][4]

On January 14, 2008, as part of a carriage agreement that allowed the provider to continue to carry Ion Television, Ion Media Networks reached an agreement with Comcast to carry both Ion Life and its children's-targeted network Qubo on its systems.[5][6] Subsequently, in May 2010, Ion Media signed carriage agreements with Advanced Cable Communications and Comcast's system in Colorado Springs, Colorado to add Ion Life to digital tiers in several markets.[7]

Even though Ion Life's parent network Ion Television overhauled its logo as part of an extensive rebranding on September 8, 2008, Ion Life retained its existing logo – a green variant of the logo Ion Television used from 2007 to 2008 – and graphics package, the latter of which remained in use until 2011. In February 2010, the network added theatrically released feature films to its schedule, usually airing from 7:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m. Eastern Time (the airtimes vary, sometimes starting earlier or ending later depending on the length and number of the films) on Monday through Friday evenings. By 2012, the number of films featured on the network had decreased, with more lifestyle-oriented programming being added to its prime time schedule; films returned to the lineup full-time the following year.

On March 27, 2017, Ion Life's logo was made over to match Ion Television's logo.

Throughout 2017 and 2018, Ion Media has begun to purchase several stations which have become channel sharing partners with their stations after the 2016 FCC spectrum auction, specifically to exploit those stations' existing must-carry pay TV coverage to allow the addition of Ion Life to cable and satellite systems, which has been refused in the past as a digital subchannel (Ion's main channel is traditionally the only channel seen on those systems). Many of these stations were formerly owned-and-operated stations associated with the Trinity Broadcasting Network, which has begun a slow withdrawal from over-the-air broadcasting in non-critical markets.

Programming

From 2007 to 2019 Ion Life primarily aired cooking, home decor, and DIY programming (with an occasional movie mixed in).

In 2019, Ion Life switched to a format of airing day-long marathons of hour-long drama programs as a compliment to sister network Ion Television. Programs airing under this new format include The Listener, Saving Hope, Rookie Blue, and White Collar.[8]

Affiliates

As of November 2015, Ion Life has current and pending affiliation agreements with 65 television stations encompassing 34 states and the District of Columbia.[9] The network has an estimated national reach of 58.29% of all households in the United States (or 182,130,362 Americans with at least one television set). Like parent network Ion Television, the network's stations almost exclusively consist of network-owned stations. Ion Life's programming is available by default via a national feed that is distributed directly to select cable and satellite providers in markets without a local Ion Television station that carries the network.

Ion Life does not have any over-the-air stations in several major markets, most notably Baltimore, Maryland; Toledo, Ohio; San Diego, California; Charlotte, North Carolina; Richmond, Virginia; Green Bay, Wisconsin; and Cincinnati, Ohio. A key factor in the network's limited national broadcast coverage is the fact that Ion Media Networks does not actively seek over-the-air distribution for the network on the digital subchannels of other network-affiliated stations (in contrast, its parent network Ion Television – which had similarly limited national coverage following the digital television transition – has begun subchannel-only affiliation arrangements through agreements with NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations' Telemundo Station Group subsidiary and Media General during 2014 and 2015[10]), with very few stations that contractually carry the network's programming (with limited exceptions in markets and Anchorage, Alaska). As a result, Ion Media Networks owns the vast majority of the stations within Ion Life's affiliate body.

References

  1. ^ Buckman, Adam (July 26, 2016). "Diginets Keep Growing, Despite Auction Cloud". TVNewsCheck. NewsCheck Media. Retrieved November 7, 2016.
  2. ^ "Ion Launches 24-Hour Diginet Ion Life". TVNewsCheck. NewsCheck Media. February 19, 2007. Retrieved November 13, 2012.
  3. ^ "ION MEDIA NETWORKS TO LAUNCH NEW DIGITAL HEALTH NETWORK". Ion Media Networks (Press release). May 31, 2006.
  4. ^ "ION UNVEILS SECOND DIGINET: I-HEALTH". TVNewsCheck. NewsCheck Media. May 31, 2006. Retrieved November 23, 2015.
  5. ^ "Ion Media Networks and Comcast Announce Affiliation Agreement for Channel Suite". Yahoo! (Press release). January 14, 2008.
  6. ^ Mike Reynolds (January 14, 2008). "ION Media Plugs In New Comcast Accord". Multichannel News. Reed Business Information.
  7. ^ "ION Media Networks Inks Multi-Affiliate Deals for Diginets". Telecommunications Weekly. May 26, 2010. Archived from the original on June 11, 2014. Retrieved February 22, 2014 – via HighBeam Research.
  8. ^ Shows - Ion Life.com
  9. ^ "Stations for Network - Ion Life". RabbitEars. Retrieved November 21, 2015.
  10. ^ Gary Dinges (November 14, 2015). "New broadcast TV network hits Austin's airwaves". Austin American-Statesman. Cox Enterprises. Retrieved November 18, 2015.

External links

Chef at Home

Chef at Home is a show presented by professionally trained chef Michael Smith. It is filmed at the Farmhouse at the Cove home in Prince Edward Island. It is currently broadcast on Food Network Canada and in the United States it is aired on ION Life and its produced by Ocean Entertainment.

Doctor Television Channel

The Doctor Television Channel, known as Doctor TV (stylized as DrTV), is a healthy lifestyle digital television network in the United States. Doctor TV is primarily affiliated with the digital sub-channels (main channel or second) of television stations owned and/or operated by Edge Spectrum Inc, as well as a handful of other station groups, with additional stations adding the channel in the near future. The network’s programming format is somewhat similar to those of ION Life and the Live Well Network.

A sister channel to IBN Television, the DrTV headquarters are located at 1511 S Chestnut St in Lufkin, Texas.

Ion Television

Ion Television is an American free-to-air television network that is owned by Ion Media. The network first began broadcasting on August 31, 1998 as Pax TV (commonly referred to as "Pax"; stylized as PAX), focusing primarily on family-oriented entertainment programming; it rebranded as i: Independent Television (commonly referred to as "i"; stylized as i) on July 1, 2005, converting into a general entertainment network featuring mainly recent and older acquired programs; the network adopted its current identity as Ion Television on January 29, 2007.

Ion Television is available throughout most of the United States through its group of 62 owned-and-operated stations, as well as through distribution on cable and satellite providers; since 2014, the network has also increased affiliate distribution in several markets through the digital subchannels of local television stations owned by companies such as NBCUniversal and Nexstar Media Group where the network is unable to maintain a main channel affiliation with or own a standalone station, for the same purpose as the distribution of Ion's main network feed via cable and satellite. The network's stations cover all of the top 20 U.S. markets and 37 of the top 50 markets. Ion's owned-and-operated stations cover 64.8% of the United States population, by far the most of any U.S. station ownership group; it is able to circumvent the legal limit of covering 39% of the population because all of its stations operate on the UHF television band, which is subject to a discount (which in the digital age has proven controversial with other broadcast groups and FCC rulings between presidential administrations, though not with Ion itself) in regard to that limit.

KILM

KILM, virtual channel 64 (UHF digital channel 24), is an Ion Life owned-and-operated television station serving Los Angeles, California, United States that is licensed to Inglewood. The station is owned by Ion Media Networks, as part of a duopoly with San Bernardino-licensed Ion Television owned-and-operated station KPXN-TV (channel 30). The two stations share offices on West Olive Avenue in Burbank and transmitter facilities atop Mount Wilson.

KPXD-TV

KPXD-TV, virtual channel 68 (UHF digital channel 25), is a Ion Television owned-and-operated television station licensed to Arlington, Texas, United States and serving the Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex. The station is owned by Ion Media Networks. KPXD's offices are located on Six Flags Drive in Arlington, and its transmitter is located on Belt Line Road in Cedar Hill.

List of Ion Life affiliates

Ion Life is an American lifestyle-oriented broadcast, cable and satellite television network owned by Ion Media Networks, which was launched on February 19, 2007. As of November 2015, the network currently has current and pending affiliation agreements with 65 television stations, the vast majority of which are owned by its corporate parent. Ion Life also distributes its base national programming feed directly to cable, satellite and IPTV providers in various media markets not listed here, as an alternative method of distribution in areas without a locally based owned-and-operated or affiliate station.

This article is a listing of current, pending and former Ion Life affiliates in the continental United States (including subchannel affiliates, satellite stations and select low-power translators), arranged alphabetically by state, and based on the station's city of license and followed in parentheses by the Designated Market Area if it differs from the city of license. There are links to and articles on each of the broadcast stations, describing their histories, technical information (such as broadcast frequencies) and any local programming.

The station's virtual (PSIP) channel number follows the call letters, and is itself followed by the station's actual digital channel number, which are listed as separate columns. The article also includes a list of its former affiliate stations, which is based strictly on the station's city of license or market, and denotes the years in which the station served as an affiliate as well as the current status of the corresponding channel that carried the network.

List of stations owned and operated by Ion Media

The following is a list of television stations owned and/or operated by Ion Media through its television stations group, Ion Media Television.

Unless otherwise indicated, all stations listed have full subchannel affiliation in the following manner:.1: Ion Television.2: Qubo.3: Ion Life.4: Ion Shop (infomercials).5: HSN.6: QVC

Low-power repeater stations do not appear on this list, but full-power repeaters are listed (in which case the originating station is listed first).For a list of all stations affiliated with Ion Television, see List of Ion Television affiliates.

List of television stations in Florida

This is a list of broadcast television stations serving cities in the U.S. state of Florida.

The Worship Network

The Worship Network, or Worship, is a broadcast television service that provides alternative Christian worship-themed programming 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The network is based in Nashville, Tennessee, in the United States, and is available in more than 50 countries. It is owned by Christian Network, Inc. (CNI).

The network was broadcast on a digital subchannel of ION Television's owned and operated stations placed after ION Life on a station's digital channel map, usually broadcasting on the -DT4 subchannel. However, ION dropped the network from its stations on January 31, 2010.

WBPX-TV

WBPX-TV, virtual channel 68 (UHF digital channel 32), is an Ion Television owned-and-operated television station licensed to Boston, Massachusetts, United States. The station is owned by Ion Media Networks, as part of a duopoly with Woburn-licensed Ion Life owned-and-operated station WDPX-TV (channel 58). The two stations share studios on Soldiers Field Road in Boston's Allston neighborhood and transmitter facilities in the Newton Upper Falls district of Newton.

WBPX is simulcast on full-power satellite station WPXG-TV (virtual channel 21, UHF digital channel 33) in Concord, New Hampshire, with transmitter on Fort Mountain near Epsom.

WCLJ-TV

WCLJ-TV, virtual channel 42 (UHF digital channel 27), is an Ion Life owned-and-operated television station serving Indianapolis, Indiana, United States that is licensed to Bloomington. The station is owned by Ion Media Networks, as part of a duopoly with Ion Television owned-and-operated station WIPX-TV (channel 63, also licensed to Bloomington). The two stations share offices on Production Drive (near I-74/I-465) in southwestern Indianapolis and transmitter facilities on County Road 50 in rural southwestern Johnson County (due southeast of Trafalgar).

On cable, WCLJ is available on Comcast Xfinity channel 2, Charter Spectrum channel 15 and AT&T U-verse channel 42.

WDLI-TV

WDLI-TV, virtual channel 17 (UHF digital channel 23), is an Ion Life owned-and-operated television station serving Cleveland and Akron, Ohio, United States that is licensed to Canton. The station is owned by Ion Media Networks, as part of a duopoly with Akron-licensed Ion Television owned-and-operated station WVPX-TV (channel 23). The two stations share offices on King James Way in Akron and transmitter facilities on the west side of the city, just north of the former site of Rolling Acres Mall.

WDPX-TV

WDPX-TV, virtual channel 58 (UHF digital channel 32), is an Ion Life owned-and-operated television station serving Boston, Massachusetts, United States that is licensed to Woburn. The station is owned by Ion Media Networks, as part of a duopoly with Boston-licensed Ion Television owned-and-operated station WBPX-TV (channel 68). The two stations share studios on Soldiers Field Road in Boston's Allston neighborhood and transmitter facilities in the Newton Upper Falls district of Newton.

WFPX-TV

WFPX-TV, virtual channel 62 (UHF digital channel 15), is an Ion Life owned-and-operated television station licensed to Archer Lodge, North Carolina, United States and serving the Triangle region (Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill–Fayetteville). The station is owned by Ion Media Networks (the former Paxson Communications), as part of a duopoly with Rocky Mount-licensed Ion Television owned-and-operated station WRPX-TV (channel 47). The two stations share a sales office on Gresham Lake Road in Raleigh and transmitting facilities near Louisburg, North Carolina.

Originally licensed to Fayetteville, it previously served as a relay of WRPX for the southern part of the market, including Fayetteville and Southern Pines; WRPX served the northern part, including Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill.

WIFS (TV)

WIFS, virtual channel 57 (UHF digital channel 32), is an Ion Life-affiliated television station serving Madison, Wisconsin, United States that is licensed to Janesville. Owned by Byrne Acquisition Group, the station maintains studios at 2814 Syene Road on Madison's far south side; its transmitter is located on Madison's southwest side.

WLWC

WLWC, virtual channel 28 (UHF digital channel 17), is an Ion Life owned-and-operated television station serving Providence, Rhode Island, United States that is licensed to New Bedford, Massachusetts. The station is owned by Ion Media Networks as part of a duopoly with Newport, Rhode Island-licensed Ion Television owned-and-operated station WPXQ-TV (channel 69). The two stations share transmitter facilities on Champlin Hill in Hopkinton, Rhode Island. WLWC is one of two major stations (along with ABC affiliate WLNE-TV, channel 6) that serve Providence despite being licensed to the Massachusetts side of the market.

WPXQ-TV

WPXQ-TV, virtual channel 69 (UHF digital channel 17), is an Ion Television owned-and-operated television station serving Providence, Rhode Island and New Bedford, Massachusetts, United States that is licensed to Newport, Rhode Island. The station is owned by Ion Media Networks (the former Paxson Communications) as part of a duopoly with New Bedford-licensed Ion Life owned-and-operated station WLWC (channel 28). The two stations share transmitter facilities on Champlin Hill in Hopkinton, Rhode Island.

Despite originally being licensed to Block Island, Rhode Island, the station was never carried by former cable operator Block Island Cable TV.

WRPX-TV

WRPX-TV, virtual channel 47 (UHF digital channel 15), is an Ion Television owned-and-operated television station licensed to Rocky Mount, North Carolina, United States and serving the Triangle region (Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill–Fayetteville). The station is owned by Ion Media Networks (the former Paxson Communications), as part of a duopoly with Archer Lodge-licensed Ion Life owned-and-operated station WFPX-TV (channel 62). The two stations share a sales office on Gresham Lake Road in Raleigh and transmitting facilities near Louisburg, North Carolina.

WRPX's signal was previously relayed on WFPX; WRPX served the northern part of the market, including Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill, while WFPX served the southern part, including Fayetteville and Southern Pines.

WSFJ-TV

WSFJ-TV, virtual channel 51 (UHF digital channel 19), is an Ion Life owned-and-operated television station licensed to London, Ohio, United States and serving the Columbus, Ohio television market. The station is owned by Ion Media Networks. WSFJ-TV's studios are located on North Central Drive in Lewis Center, and its transmitter is located on Twin Rivers Drive near downtown Columbus.

Digital television in North America
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Technical issues
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