International Driving Permit

An international driving permit (IDP), often (incorrectly) referred to as an international driving licence (IDL), is any valid, legal identity document that allows the holder to drive a private motor vehicle in any country or jurisdiction that recognises the document. To be valid, the IDP must be accompanied by a valid driving licence issued in the applicant's country of residence.[1]

International driving permits issued by any party who does not have the authority to do so are considered invalid. An international driving permit is invalid if its format largely differs from that of the Vienna Conventions.[2][3][4]

The IDP, whose A6 size (148 × 105 mm) is slightly larger than a passport, is a multi-language translation of the driver's licence from the issuing nation, complete with photograph and vital statistics.

An IDP is not required if the driver's domestic licence meets the requirements of the 1968 convention; the domestic licence can be used directly in a foreign jurisdiction that is a party to that convention.

ROC-MOTC International Driving Permit 2006-03-20
An International Driving Permit issued by the Republic of China (Taiwan)

Driver information

1968 convention (as amended in 2011)

Fahrerlaubnisklassen

The main regulations about driving licences are in Annex 6 (domestic driving permit) and Annex 7 (International Driving Permit). The currently active version of those is in force in each contracting party since no later than 29 March 2011 (Article 43).

Article 41 of the convention describes requirements for driving licences. Key of those are:

  • every driver of a motor vehicle must hold a driving licence;
  • driving licences can be issued only after passing theoretical and practical exams, which are regulated by each country or jurisdiction;
  • Contracting parties shall recognize as valid for driving in their territories:
    • domestic driving licence conforms to the provisions of annex 6 to the convention;
    • International Driving Permit conforms to the provisions of annex 7 to the convention, on condition that it is presented with the corresponding domestic driving licence;
  • driving licences issued by a contracting party shall be recognised in the territory of another contracting party until this territory becomes the place of normal residence of their holder;
  • all of the above does not apply to learner-driver licences;
  • the period of validity of an international driving permit shall be either no more than three years after the date of issue or until the date of expiry of the domestic driving licence, whichever is earlier;
  • Contracting parties may refuse to recognise the validity of driving licences for persons under eighteen or, for categories C, D, CE and DE, under twenty-one;
  • an international driving permit shall only be issued by the contracting party in whose territory the holder has their normal residence and that issued the domestic driving licence or that recognised the driving licence issued by another contracting party; it shall not be valid for use in that territory.
Licence categories according to the 1968 convention applicable from 29 March 2011[5]
Category Description Category Description
A
Motorcycles
A1
Motorcycles with a cubic capacity not exceeding 125 cm³ and a power not exceeding 11 kW (light motorcycles)
B
Motor vehicles, other than those in category A, having a permissible maximum mass not exceeding 3,500 kg and not more than eight seats in addition to the driver's seat; or motor vehicles of category В coupled to a trailer the permissible maximum mass of which does not exceed 750 kg; or motor vehicles of category В coupled to a trailer the permissible maximum mass of which exceeds 750 kg but does not exceed the unladen mass of the motor vehicle, where the combined permissible maximum mass of the vehicles so coupled does not exceed 3,500 kg
B1
Motor tricycles and quadricycles
C
Motor vehicles, other than those in category D, having a permissible maximum mass exceeding 3,500 kg; or motor vehicles of category С coupled to a trailer the permissible maximum mass of which does not exceed 750 kg
C1
Motor vehicles, with the exception of those in category D, the permissible maximum mass of which exceeds 3,500 kg but does not exceed 7,500 kg; or motor vehicles of subcategory C1 coupled to a trailer, the permissible maximum mass of which does not exceed 750 kg
D
Motor vehicles used for the carriage of passengers and having more than eight seats in addition to the driver's seat; or motor vehicles of category D coupled to a trailer the permissible maximum mass of which does not exceed 750 kg
D1
Motor vehicles used for the carriage of passengers and having more than 8 seats in addition to the driver's seat but not more than 16 seats in addition to the driver's seat; or motor vehicles of subcategory D1 coupled to a trailer, the permissible maximum mass of which does not exceed 750 kg
BE
Motor vehicles of category В coupled to a trailer the permissible maximum mass of which exceeds 750 kg and exceeds the unladen mass of the motor vehicle; or motor vehicles of category В coupled to a trailer the permissible maximum mass of which exceeds 750 kg, where the combined permissible maximum mass of the vehicles so coupled exceeds 3,500 kg
CE
Motor vehicles of category С coupled to a trailer whose permissible maximum mass exceeds 750 kg
C1E
Motor vehicles of subcategory C1 coupled to a trailer the permissible maximum mass of which exceeds 750 kg but does not exceed the unladen mass of the motor vehicle, where the combined permissible maximum mass of the vehicles so coupled does not exceed 12,000 kg
DE
Motor vehicles of category D coupled to a trailer whose permissible maximum mass exceeds 750 kg
D1E
Motor vehicles of subcategory D1 coupled to a trailer, not used for the carriage of persons, the permissible maximum mass of which exceeds 750 kg but does not exceed the unladen mass of the motor vehicle, where the combined permissible maximum mass of the vehicles so coupled does not exceed 12,000 kg

1968 convention (original)

The Convention on Road Traffic has been ratified by 72 countries/jurisdiction. Examples of countries/jurisdictions that have not ratified the Convention include Chile, Taiwan (Republic of China), Costa Rica, Ecuador, the Holy See, Indonesia, Ireland, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Mexico, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, and Venezuela.

The Convention had amendments on 3 September 1993 and 28 March 2006. There is a European Agreement supplementing the Convention on Road Traffic (1968), which was concluded in Geneva, on 1 May 1971.

Note that before 29 March 2011 the convention demanded contracting parties to recognise as valid for driving in their territories:

  • any domestic driver's licence drawn up in their national language or in one of their national languages, or, if not drawn up in such a language, accompanied by a certified translation;
  • any domestic driver's licence conforming to the provisions of annex 6 to the convention; and
  • any international driver permit conforming to the provisions of annex 7 to the convention.

Prior to 29 March 2011, annex 6 and annex 7 defined forms of driver's licences that are different from those defined after that date. Driving licences issued before 29 March 2011 that match older edition of the annexes are valid until their expiration dates (article 43).

Licence classes according to the 1968 convention[5]
Class Description
A
Motor cycles
B
Motor vehicles, other than those in category A, having a permissible maximum weight not exceeding 3,500 kg and not more than eight seats in addition to the driver's seat.
C
Motor vehicles used for the carriage of goods and whose permissible maximum weight exceeds 3,500 kg.
D
Motor vehicles used for the carriage of passengers and having more than eight seats in addition to the driver's seat.
E
Combinations of vehicles of which the drawing vehicles is in a category or categories for which the driver is licensed (B and/or C and/or D), but that are themselves in that category or categories.

1949 convention

The 1949 Geneva Convention on Road Traffic has been ratified by 96 states.[6] The 1949 Convention's description of a driving permit and international driving permit are located in Annexes 9 and 10. Switzerland signed but did not ratify the Convention.

There is a European Agreement supplementing the 1949 Convention on Road Traffic, in addition to the 1949 Protocol on Road Signs and Signals, concluded in Geneva on 16 September 1950.

Licence classes according to the 1949 convention[7]
Class Description
A
Motor cycles, with or without a side-car, invalid carriages and three-wheeled motor vehicles with an unladen weight not exceeding 400 kg (900 lbs).
B
Motor vehicles used for the transport of passengers and comprising, in addition to the driver's seat, at most eight seats, or those used for the transport of goods and having a permissible maximum weight not exceeding 3,500 kg (7,700 lbs). Vehicles in this category may be coupled with a light trailer.
C
Motor vehicles used for the transport of goods and of which the permissible maximum weight exceeds 3,500 kg (7,700 lbs). Vehicles in this category may be coupled with a light trailer.
D
Motor vehicles used for the transport of passengers and comprising, in addition to the driver's seat, more than eight seats. Vehicles in this category may be coupled with a light trailer.
E
Motor vehicles of category B, C, or D, as authorized above, with other than light trailer.
  • "Permissible maximum weight" of a vehicle means the weight of the vehicle and its maximum load when the vehicle is ready for road.
  • "Maximum load" means the weight of the load declared permissible by the competent authority of the country(or jurisdiction) of registration of the vehicle.
  • "Light trailers" shall be those of permissible maximum weight not exceeding 750 kg (1,650 lbs).

1926 convention

The 1926 Convention on Motor Traffic is the older IDP Convention. It is only required in Iraq, Somalia[8] and Brazil.[9] International Driving Permits according to the 1926 Convention on Motor Traffic are also valid in Liechtenstein and Mexico[10] which also didn't ratify any of the above-mentioned later conventions.[11][12] Mexico also recognizes[13] the Inter-American Driving Permit according to the Convention on the Regulation of Inter-American Automotive Traffic 1943.[14] This convention also contains regulations about driving licences and an international driving licence in its Articles VI and XIII and its Annex B[15] and thus gives an alternative opportunity for a valid driving permit based on a convention between several sovereign states. Article XIII paragraph 2 says "the international driving licence issued in accordance with the international Convention of 1926 shall be deemed to meet the requirements of this Article" (which defines the requirements of the international driving licence according to the Convention on the Regulation of Inter-American Automotive Traffic 1943).

For states that have ratified the 1926 Convention on Motor Traffic[16] but did not ratify the Convention on Road Traffic (1949 Geneva Convention on Road Traffic) (e.g. Germany) or the Convention on Road Traffic (1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic) (Argentina, Chile, Egypt, Spain, India, Ireland, Iceland, Lebanese Republic, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Sri Lanka, Syria, Thailand and the Vatican City State [eventually via the Holy See as contract party]) the number of states in which the International Driving Permit according to the 1926 Convention on Motor Traffic is valid, is higher.

Licence classes according to the 1926 convention[17]
Class Description
A
Motor vehicles of which the laden weight does not exceed 3,500 kg.
B
Motor vehicles of which the laden weight exceeds 3,500 kg.
C
Motor-cycles, with or without side-car.

Validation

According to the 1968 Vienna Convention, an IDP must have an expiration date of no more than three years from its issue date or until the expiration date of national driving permit, whichever is earlier, and it is valid for a period of one year upon the arrival in the foreign country. The previous convention (1949 Geneva Convention) stated that an IDP remains valid for one year from the date of issue, with a grace period of six months.

The IDP is not valid for driving in the country or jurisdiction where it was issued, it can only be used in foreign countries, and it must be shown with the carrier's original driver's license.

Countries and jurisdictions that are parties to 1949 Geneva Convention

The current parties to the 1949 Geneva Convention are listed below.[18] These jurisdictions issue International Driving Permits.

Asia, Oceania (19) Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China (Republic of), Fiji, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam

Americas (15) Argentina, Barbados, Canada, Chile, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Haiti, Jamaica, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of Dominica, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, Venezuela

Europe (36) Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of San Marino, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Serbia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, Vatican City (Holy See)

Lithuania accessed in 2019[19].

Middle East, Africa (32) Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ghana, Israel, Jordan, Kingdom of Lesotho, Lebanon, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Morocco, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Republic of Congo, Republic of South Africa, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Syria, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Zimbabwe

Countries and jurisdictions that are parties to 1968 Vienna Convention

The current parties to the 1968 Vienna Convention are listed below.[20] These jurisdictions issue and recognize International Driving Permits.

Participant Signature Accession(a), Succession(d), Ratification
Albania 29 Jun 2000 a
Armenia 8 Feb 2005 a
Austria 8 Nov 1968 11 Aug 1981
Azerbaijan 3 Jul 2002 a
Bahamas 14 May 1991 a
Bahrain 4 May 1973 a
Belarus 8 Nov 1968 18 Jun 1974
Belgium 8 Nov 1968 16 Nov 1988
Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 Sep 1993 d
Brazil 8 Nov 1968 29 Oct 1980
Bulgaria 8 Nov 1968 28 Dec 1978
Cabo Verde 12 Jun 2018 a
Central African Republic 3 Feb 1988 a
Chile 8 Nov 1968
Costa Rica 8 Nov 1968
Côte d'Ivoire 24 Jul 1985 a
Croatia 23 Nov 1992 d
Cuba 30 Sep 1977 a
Czech Republic 2 Jun 1993 d
Democratic Republic of the Congo 25 Jul 1977 a
Denmark 8 Nov 1968 3 Nov 1986
Ecuador 8 Nov 1968
Estonia 24 Aug 1992 a
Finland 16 Dec 1969 1 Apr 1985
France 8 Nov 1968 9 Dec 1971
Georgia 23 Jul 1993 a
Germany 8 Nov 1968 3 Aug 1978
Ghana 22 Aug 1969
Greece 18 Dec 1986 a
Guyana 31 Jan 1973 a
Holy See 8 Nov 1968
Hungary 8 Nov 1968 16 Mar 1976
Indonesia 8 Nov 1968
Iran (Islamic Republic of) 8 Nov 1968 21 May 1976
Iraq 1 Feb 2017 a
Israel 8 Nov 1968 11 May 1971
Italy 8 Nov 1968 2 Oct 1996
Kazakhstan 4 Apr 1994 a
Kenya 9 Sep 2009 a
Kuwait 14 Mar 1980 a
Kyrgyzstan 30 Aug 2006 a
Latvia 19 Oct 1992 a
Liberia 16 Sep 2005 a
Lithuania 20 Nov 1991 a
Luxembourg 8 Nov 1968 25 Nov 1975
Mexico 8 Nov 1968
Monaco 6 Jun 1978 a
Mongolia 19 Dec 1997 a
Montenegro 23 Oct 2006 d
Morocco 29 Dec 1982 a
Netherlands 8 Nov 2007 a
Niger 11 Jul 1975 a
Nigeria 18 Oct 2018 a
North Macedonia 18 Aug 1993 d
Norway 23 Dec 1969 1 Apr 1985
Pakistan 19 Mar 1986 a
Peru 6 Oct 2006 a
Philippines 8 Nov 1968 27 Dec 1973
Poland 8 Nov 1968 23 Aug 1984
Portugal 8 Nov 1968 30 Sep 2010
Qatar 6 Mar 2013 a
Republic of Korea 29 Dec 1969
Republic of Moldova 26 May 1993 a
Romania 8 Nov 1968 9 Dec 1980
Russian Federation 8 Nov 1968 7 Jun 1974
San Marino 8 Nov 1968 20 Jul 1970
Saudi Arabia 12 May 2016 a
Senegal 16 Aug 1972 a
Serbia 12 Mar 2001 d
Seychelles 11 Apr 1977 a
Slovakia 1 Feb 1993 d
Slovenia 6 Jul 1992 d
South Africa 1 Nov 1977 a
Spain 8 Nov 1968
Sweden 8 Nov 1968 25 Jul 1985
Switzerland 8 Nov 1968 11 Dec 1991
Tajikistan Example 9 Mar 1994 a
Thailand 8 Nov 1968
Tunisia 5 Jan 2004 a
Turkey 22 Jan 2013 a
Turkmenistan 14 Jun 1993 a
Ukraine 8 Nov 1968 12 Jul 1974
United Arab Emirates 10 Jan 2007 a
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland 8 Nov 1968 28 Mar 2018
Uruguay 8 Apr 1981 a
Uzbekistan 17 Jan 1995 a
Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) 8 Nov 1968
Viet Nam 20 Aug 2014 a
Zimbabwe 31 Jul 1981 a

Countries and jurisdictions that recognize IDP

* Requires presentation to local police and payment of special registration upon arrival
** IDP must be exchanged for a local driving licence.

References

Notes

  1. ^ "Canadian driver's licences valid in Florida, after all". CBC News. Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  2. ^ Hasham, Alyshah (14 February 2013). "Florida Highway Patrol won't enforce international driver's permit rule". The Toronto Star. ISSN 0319-0781. Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  3. ^ "International Driver's License Scams". Consumer Information. 26 July 2012. Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  4. ^ https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/MTDSG/Volume%20I/Chapter%20XI/xi-b-1.en.pdf
  5. ^ a b "1968 Convention on Road Traffic (2006 consolidated version) in English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese and Arabic" (PDF). unece.org.
  6. ^ "United Nations Treaty Collection". un.org.
  7. ^ Convention on Road Traffic of 1949
  8. ^ "International Driving Permits". AutoDriverClub. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  9. ^ "IDP Country List | AA". www.theaa.com. Retrieved 14 June 2017.
  10. ^ List of contract-party-states in the current version of the german International Driving Permit according to the 1926 Convention on Motor Traffic. (In german language.) Bundesministerium der Justiz und für Verbraucherschutz (Federal Ministry for Justice and Consumer protection of the Federal Republic of Germany). Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  11. ^ Status of the 1 . Convention on Road Traffic Geneva, 19 September 1949. United Nations Treaty Collection. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  12. ^ Status of the 19 . Convention on Road Traffic Vienna, 8 November 1968. United Nations Treaty Collection. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  13. ^ Countries Recognizing an Inter-American Driving Permit according to the Convention on the Regulation of Inter-American Automotive Traffic 1943. AutoDriverClub. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  14. ^ Convention on the Regulation of Inter-American Automotive Traffic 1943. AutoDriverClub. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  15. ^ Annex B of the Convention on the Regulation of Inter-American Automotive Traffic 1943. AutoDriverClub. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  16. ^ French original text of the 1926 Convention internationale relative à la circulation automobile containig a list of states that form the area of application of the convention (Champ d'application de la convention). Les autorités fédérales de la Confédération suisse (The federal authorities of the Swiss Confederation). Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  17. ^ Anlage 8b zu § 25b Absatz 2 der Verordnung über die Zulassung von Personen zum Straßenverkehr [Fahrerlaubnis-Verordnung - FeV] vom 13. Dezember 2010 [BGBl. I S. 1980], die durch Artikel 2 der Verordnung vom 5. November 2013 [BGBl. I S. 3920] geändert worden ist: Muster eines Internationalen Führerscheins nach dem Internationalen Abkommen über Kraftfahrzeugverkehr vom 24. April 1926. (Appendix 8b to Section 25b Paragraph 2 of the Driving Licence Ordinance [of the Federal Republic of Germany]: Sample of an International Driving Permit according to the International Convention of the 24. April 1926.) (In german language.) Retrieved 19 March 2014.
  18. ^ STATUS AS AT 2017-08-07-08. CHAPTER XI. TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS. Convention on Road Traffic, Geneva, 19 September 1949
  19. ^ United nations
  20. ^ "1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic". United Nations Treaty Collection. Retrieved 29 April 2019.

External links

Alabama HB 56

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Car rental

A car rental, hire car, or car hire agency is a company that rents automobiles for short periods of time, generally ranging from a few hours to a few weeks. It is often organised with numerous local branches (which allow a user to return a vehicle to a different location), and primarily located near airports or busy city areas and often complemented by a website allowing online reservations.

Car rental agencies primarily serve people who require a temporary vehicle, for example, those who do not own their own car, travelers who are out of town, or owners of damaged or destroyed vehicles who are awaiting repair or insurance compensation. Car rental agencies may also serve the self-moving industry needs, by renting vans or trucks, and in certain markets, other types of vehicles such as motorcycles or scooters may also be offered.

Alongside the basic rental of a vehicle, car rental agencies typically also offer extra products such as insurance, global positioning system (GPS) navigation systems, entertainment systems, mobile phones, portable WiFi and child safety seats.

Category D

Category D can refer to:

Category D pregnancy - Positive evidence of risk

Category D Prison

Category D, for an International Driving Permit

Category D village

Category D stations (DfT)

Driver's license

A driver's license is an official document, often plastic and the size of a credit card, permitting a specific individual to operate one or more types of motorized vehicles, such as a motorcycle, car, truck, or bus on a public road.

In most international agreements the wording driving permit is used, for instance in the Vienna Convention on Road Traffic.

The term driver's license is American English; the Canadian English equivalent is driver's licence, the Australian and New Zealand English equivalent is driver licence and in many Commonwealth countries and Ireland it is driving licence. In this article, the American terminology and spelling is used generally but in country specific sections, the local spelling variant is used.

The laws relating to the licensing of drivers vary between jurisdictions. In some jurisdictions, a permit is issued after the recipient has passed a driving test, while in others, a person acquires their permit before beginning to drive. Different categories of permit often exist for different types of motor vehicles, particularly large trucks and passenger vehicles. The difficulty of the driving test varies considerably between jurisdictions, as do factors such as age and the required level of competence and practice.

Driving licence in Pakistan

In Pakistan, the driving licence is the official document which authorises its holder to operate various types of motor vehicle on roads to which the public have access. Driving licences can be obtained by applying to any traffic police office/licensing authority in applicant's district.u

Driving licence in Thailand

Like many other countries, a driver's licence is required before someone can drive on any road in Thailand. A Thai driver's licence is issued by the Department of Land Transport, Ministry of Transport and can be used throughout the Kingdom of Thailand and other ASEAN states without an International Driving Permit. The minimum age to drive a motor vehicle is 18, and to drive a motorcycle is 15.

Driving license in Indonesia

Indonesian Driving License or Surat Izin Mengemudi (SIM) is a legal document required in Indonesia before they are allowed to drive a motor vehicle. The Indonesian driving license is issued by the Indonesian National Police (Polri). The general requirements for a license in Indonesia are to be at least 17 years old (for A-class; different age requirement exist for each class), pass the theory test, and pass the practical test.

Driving license in Taiwan

In Taiwan, Driving licenses (汽車駕駛執照) are issued by the Ministry of Transportation and Communications to a qualified motor vehicle driver. The number of the driving license in Taiwan is the same as the ID number of the license holder's household registration in Taiwan. In Taiwan, the driving license sometimes accepted as a valid identity document, since the information on a driving license replicates most of those on a National Identification Card.

Gross vehicle weight rating

The gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR), or gross vehicle mass (GVM) is the maximum operating weight/mass of a vehicle as specified by the manufacturer including the vehicle's chassis, body, engine, engine fluids, fuel, accessories, driver, passengers and cargo but excluding that of any trailers. The term is used for motor vehicles and trains.

The weight of a vehicle is influenced by passengers, cargo, even fuel level, so a number of terms are used to express the weight of a vehicle in a designated state. Gross combined weight rating (GCWR) refers to the total mass of a vehicle, including all trailers. GVWR and GCWR both describe a vehicle that is in operation and are used to specify weight limitations and restrictions. Curb weight describes a vehicle which is "parked at the curb" and excludes the weight of any occupants or cargo. Dry weight further excludes the weight of all consumables, such as fuel and oils. Gross trailer weight rating specifies the maximum weight of a trailer and the gross axle weight rating specifies the maximum weight on any particular axle.

Inter-American Driving Permit

The Inter-American Driving Permit (IADP) is an identity document that licenses the holder to drive a private motor vehicle in another nation when accompanied by a valid license from their home country. The IADP is similar to the International Driving Permit (IDP), but is specific to drivers in North, Central, and South America. To be eligible for an IADP, one must first have a valid driver's license.

Permit

Permit may refer to:

Permit (fish), a game fish of the western Atlantic Ocean belonging to the family Carangidae, Trachinotus falcatus

Various legal licenses:

License

Work permit, legal authorization which allows a person to take employment

Learner's permit, restricted license that is given to a person who is learning to drive

International Driving Permit, allows an individual to drive a private motor vehicle in another nation

Disabled parking permit, displayed upon a vehicle carrying a person whose mobility is significantly impaired

Protest permit, permission granted by a governmental agency for a demonstration

Construction permit, required in most jurisdictions for new construction, or adding onto pre-existing structures

Filming permit, required in most jurisdictions for filming motion pictures and television

Home Return Permit, Mainland (China) Travel Permit for Hong Kong and Macao Residents

One-way Permit, document issued by the PRC allowing residents of mainland China to leave the mainland for Hong Kong

Thresher/Permit class submarine, a class of nuclear-powered fast attack submarines in service with the United States Navy

USS Permit (SS-178), a Porpoise-class submarine of the United States Navy

USS Permit (SSN-594), the lead ship of her class of submarine of the United States Navy

Permit (film), a 1979 Pakistani Punjabi film

Touring and Automobile Club of Turkey

The Touring and Automobile Club of Turkey (Turkish: Türkiye Turing ve Otomobil Kurumu) (TTOK), also known as Turkish Automobile Association, is an amateur and international organization dedicated to tourism and the automobile sector. It was founded in 1923 at the behest of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk by a group of intellectuals led by Reşit Saffet Atabinen, a diplomat at the time and a historian. The club is a member of Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and Alliance Internationale de Tourisme (AIT).

Traffic stop

A traffic stop, commonly called being pulled over, is a temporary detention of a driver of a vehicle by police to investigate a possible crime or minor violation of law.

Traffic violations reciprocity

Under traffic violations reciprocity agreements, non-resident drivers are treated like residents when they are stopped for a traffic offense that occurs in another jurisdiction. They also ensure that punishments such as penalty points on one's license and the ensuing increase in insurance premiums follow the driver home. The general principle of such interstate, interprovincial, and/or international compacts is to guarantee the rule "one license, one record."

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Transportation in Florida

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Truck classification

Truck classifications are typically based upon the maximum loaded weight of the truck, typically using the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) and sometimes also the gross trailer weight rating (GTWR), and can vary among jurisdictions.

Vienna Convention on Road Traffic

The Convention on Road Traffic, commonly known as the Vienna Convention on Road Traffic, is an international treaty designed to facilitate international road traffic and to increase road safety by establishing standard traffic rules among the contracting parties. The convention was agreed upon at the United Nations Economic and Social Council's Conference on Road Traffic (7 October – 8 November 1968) and concluded in Vienna on 8 November 1968. It came into force on 21 May 1977. The convention has been ratified by 78 countries, but those who have not ratified the convention may still be parties to the 1949 Convention on Road Traffic. This conference also produced the Convention on Road Signs and Signals.

Rules of the road
Road user guides
Enforcement
Speed limit
Moving violations
Driver licensing
Traffic violations reciprocity
Parking
Automotive safety
Road safety

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