International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes

The International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP) formerly the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria (ICNB) or Bacteriological Code (BC) governs the scientific names for Bacteria and Archaea.[1][2] It denotes the rules for naming taxa of bacteria, according to their relative rank. As such it is one of the nomenclature codes of biology.

Originally the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature dealt with bacteria, and this kept references to bacteria until these were eliminated at the 1975 IBC. An early Code for the nomenclature of bacteria was approved at the 4th International Congress for Microbiology in 1947, but was later discarded.

The latest version to be printed in book form is the 1990 Revision,[3] but the book does not represent the current rules, as the Code has been amended since (these changes have been published in the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology (IJSEM)).[2] The 2008 Revision has since been published in the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology (IJSEM). rules are maintained by the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes (ICSP; formerly the International Committee on Systematic Bacteriology, ICSB).

The base-line for bacterial names is the Approved Lists[4] with a starting point of 1980. New bacterial names are reviewed by the ICSP as being in conformity with the Rules of Nomenclature and published in the IJSEM.

As of 2011, the formal separation of the botanical and bacteriological codes continues to cause problems with the nomenclature of certain groups.[5]

Versions

  • Buchanan, R. E., and Ralph St. John-Brooks. (1947, June) (Editors). Proposed Bacteriological Code of Nomenclature. Developed from proposals approved by International Committee on Bacteriological Nomenclature at the Meeting of the Third International Congress for Microbiology. Publication authorized in Plenary Session, pp. 61. Iowa State College Press, Ames, Iowa. U.S.A. Hathi Trust.
  • Buchanan R. E., St. John-Brooks R., Breed R. S. (1948). International bacteriological code of nomenclature. Journal of Bacteriology 55:287–306. link. Reprinted 1949, Journal of General Microbiology 3, 444–462.
  • International Committee on Bacteriological Nomenclature. (1958, June). International code of nomenclature of bacteria and viruses. Ames, Iowa State College Press. BHL.
  • Lapage, S.P., Sneath, P.H.A., Lessel, E.F., Skerman, V.B.D., Seeliger, H.P.R. & Clark, W.A. (1975). International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria. 1975 Revision. American Society of Microbiology, Washington, D.C
  • Lapage, S.P., Sneath, P.H.A., Lessel, E.F., Skerman, V.B.D., Seeliger, H.P.R. & Clark, W.A. (1992). International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria. Bacteriological Code. 1990 Revision. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.C. link.
  • Parker, C.T., Tindall, B.J. & Garrity, G.M. (2019) International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes. 2008 Revision. Microbiology Society doi:https://ijs.microbiologyresearch.org/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.000778)

See also

References

  1. ^ International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes (ICSP)
  2. ^ a b P. H. A. Sneath, 2003. A short history of the Bacteriological Code URL Archived 2012-05-24 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Bacteriological Code (1990 Revision)
  4. ^ VBD Skerman, Vicki McGowan, and PHA Sneath, 1989. Approved Lists of Bacterial Names, Amended edition Washington (DC): ASM Press
  5. ^ Oren, A. (2011). "Cyanobacterial systematics and nomenclature as featured in the International Bulletin of Bacteriological Nomenclature and Taxonomy / International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology / International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 61 (1): 10–15. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.018838-0. PMID 21097637.

External links

Bacterial taxonomy

Bacterial taxonomy is the taxonomy, i.e. the rank-based classification, of bacteria.

In the scientific classification established by Carl Linnaeus, each species has to be assigned to a genus (binary nomenclature), which in turn is a lower level of a hierarchy of ranks (family, suborder, order, subclass, class, division/phyla, kingdom and domain).

In the currently accepted classification of life, there are three domains (Eukaryotes, Bacteria and Archaea), which, in terms of taxonomy, despite following the same principles have several different conventions between them and between their subdivisions as are studied by different disciplines (botany, zoology, mycology and microbiology), for example in zoology there are type specimens, whereas in microbiology there are type strains.

Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (formerly Bacillus thetaiotaomicron) is a species of bacterium of the genus Bacteroides. It is a gram-negative obligate anaerobe. It is one of the most common bacteria found in human gut flora and is also an opportunistic pathogen. Its genome contains numerous genes apparently specialized in digestion of polysaccharides.

Clostridioides

Clostridioides is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria, which includes Clostridioides difficile, a human pathogen causing an infectious diarrhea.

International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes

The International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes (ICSP), formerly the International Committee on Systematic Bacteriology (ICSB), is the body that oversees the nomenclature of prokaryotes, determines the rules by which prokaryotes are named and whose Judicial Commission issues Opinions concerning taxonomic matters, revisions to the Bacteriological Code, etc.

Nomenclature codes

Nomenclature codes or codes of nomenclature are the various rulebooks that govern biological taxonomic nomenclature, each in their own broad field of organisms. To an end-user who only deals with names of species, with some awareness that species are assignable to families, it may not be noticeable that there is more than one code, but beyond this basic level these are rather different in the way they work.

The successful introduction of two-part names for species by Linnaeus was the start for an ever-expanding system of nomenclature. With all naturalists worldwide adopting this approach to thinking up names there arose several schools of thought about the details. It became ever more apparent that a detailed body of rules was necessary to govern scientific names. From the mid-nineteenth century onwards there were several initiatives to arrive at worldwide-accepted sets of rules. Presently nomenclature codes govern the naming of:

Algae, Fungi and Plants – International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN), which in July 2011 replaced the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN) and the earlier International Rules of Botanical Nomenclature.

Animals – International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN)

Bacteria – International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), which in 2008 replaced the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria (ICNB)

Cultivated plants – International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP)

Plant associations – International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature (ICPN)

Viruses – The International Code of Virus Classification and Nomenclature (ICVCN); see also virus classification

Subspecies

In biological classification, the term subspecies refers to one of two or more populations of a species living in different subdivisions of the species' range and varying from one another by morphological characteristics.

A single subspecies cannot be recognized independently: a species is either recognized as having no subspecies at all or at least two, including any that are extinct. The term may be abbreviated to subsp. or ssp. The plural is the same as the singular: subspecies.

In zoology, under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, the subspecies is the only taxonomic rank below that of species that can receive a name. In botany and mycology, under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, other infraspecific ranks, such as variety, may be named. In bacteriology and virology, under standard bacterial nomenclature and virus nomenclature, there are recommendations but not strict requirements for recognizing other important infraspecific ranks.

A taxonomist decides whether to recognize a subspecies or not. A common criterion for recognizing two distinct populations as subspecies rather than full species is the ability of them to interbreed without a fitness penalty. In the wild, subspecies do not interbreed due to geographic isolation or sexual selection. The differences between subspecies are usually less distinct than the differences between species.

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