Innings pitched

In baseball, innings pitched (IP) are the number of innings a pitcher has completed, measured by the number of batters and baserunners that are put out while the pitcher is on the pitching mound in a game. Three outs made is equal to one inning pitched. One out counts as one-third of an inning, and two outs counts as two-thirds of an inning. Sometimes, the statistic is written 34.1, 72.2, or 91.0, for example, to represent ​34 13 innings, ​72 23 innings, and 91 innings exactly, respectively.

Runners left on base by a pitcher are not counted in determining innings pitched. It is possible for a pitcher to enter a game, give up several hits and possibly even several runs, and be removed before achieving any outs, thereby recording a total of zero innings pitched.

Decline

The only active players in the top 100 all-time at the end of the 2009 season were Tom Glavine (ranked 30th with ​4,413 13 IP), Randy Johnson (ranked 38th with ​4,135 13), Jamie Moyer (ranked 45th with ​3,908 23) and John Smoltz (ranked 74th with 3473). By the end of the 2018 season, only two active players were in the top 100 all-time: CC Sabathia (ranked 73rd with 3470), and Bartolo Colón (ranked 74th with ​3461 23). This is because over time, innings pitched has declined. Several factors are responsible for this decline:

  • From 1876–1892, pitchers threw from fifty feet and exerted less stress on their arms (also pitchers often threw underhand in this era). In this era, season totals of 600 innings pitched were not uncommon.
  • In 1892, pitchers moved back to the current distance of sixty feet, six inches. However, they still often threw 400 innings in a season. This was because the home run was far less common and pitchers often conserved arm strength throughout the game.
  • From 1920 to the 1980s, the four-man pitching rotation was well established. Pitchers could no longer throw 400 innings in a season, as the home run meant a run could be scored at any time. The league leader in innings pitched often threw somewhat more than 300 innings. Occasionally, innings pitched would spike, as in the early 1970s, when Wilbur Wood pitched ​376 23 innings in 1972 and then ​359 13 innings in 1973.
  • From the 1980s to the present, the four-man rotation was replaced with the five-man rotation, with a weak fifth man who would often be skipped on off days. Also, managers starting using their bullpens more and more, accelerating the decline in innings pitched. Today, only a few pitchers pitch more than 250 innings in a season.

Records

All-time leaders

Rank Player Innings pitched
1 Cy Young 7,356
2 Pud Galvin 6,003 13
3 Walter Johnson 5,914 13
4 Phil Niekro 5,404
5 Nolan Ryan 5,386
6 Gaylord Perry 5,350
7 Don Sutton 5,282 13
8 Warren Spahn * 5,243 23
9 Steve Carlton * 5,217 23
10 Grover Cleveland Alexander 5,190
11 Kid Nichols 5,067 13
12 Tim Keefe 5,049 23
13 Greg Maddux 5,008 13
14 Bert Blyleven 4,970
15 Bobby Mathews 4,956
16 Roger Clemens 4,916 23
17 Mickey Welch 4,802
18 Christy Mathewson 4,788 23
19 Tom Seaver 4,783
20 Tommy John * 4,710 13
* Pitched left-handed
Active players in bold
Through 2016 season

Single season leaders

Per Baseball Reference:[1]

Rank Player Year Team Innings pitched
1 Ed Walsh 1908 Chicago White Sox 464
2 Jack Chesbro 1904 New York Highlanders 454 23
3 Joe McGinnity 1903 New York Giants 434
4 Ed Walsh 1907 Chicago White Sox 422 13
5 Vic Willis 1902 Boston Beaneaters 410
6 Joe McGinnity 1904 New York Giants 408
7 Ed Walsh 1912 Chicago White Sox 393
8 Dave Davenport 1915 St. Louis Terriers 392 23
9 Christy Mathewson 1908 New York Giants 390 23
10 Jack Powell 1904 New York Highlanders 390 13

References

  1. ^ "Pitching Season Finder (Single seasons, IP>=390)". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 28, 2017.

External links

1907 Chicago White Sox season

The 1907 Chicago White Sox led the American League for much of the first half but finished third.

Chicago allowed the fewest runs in the AL. The pitching staff was led by Ed Walsh, who paced the circuit in innings pitched (422.1), complete games (37), and earned run average (1.60).

Babe Ruth Award

The Babe Ruth Award is given annually to the Major League Baseball (MLB) player with the best performance in the postseason. The award, created in honor of Babe Ruth, was first awarded in 1949 to the MVP of the World Series, one year after Ruth's death. The award was created by the New York City chapter of the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). It continued to be awarded exclusively for performances in the World Series until 2007, when the New York chapter of the BBWAA changed the award to cover the entire postseason. Though it is older than the World Series Most Valuable Player Award, which was not created until 1955 (as the "SPORT Magazine Award"), the Babe Ruth Award is considered less prestigious, because it is not sanctioned by MLB and is awarded several weeks after the World Series.MLB expanded its postseason to include the League Championship Series (LCS) in 1969, the League Division Series (LDS) in 1995, and the Wild Card round in 2012. The Wild Card round is a one-game playoff, the LDS follows a best-of-five playoff format, and the LCS and World Series follow a best-of-seven playoff format. The most recent World Series champions are the Boston Red Sox, who won the 2018 World Series. David Price was named recipient of the Babe Ruth Award.Ruth was a noted slugger who batted .326 with 15 home runs and three wins in three games started as a pitcher during World Series play. However, the Babe Ruth Award does not only go to sluggers or pitchers. Dick Green won the award for the 1974 World Series, in which he batted 0-for-13, but helped the Oakland Athletics win the series with his defense.Joe Page of the New York Yankees was the first winner of the Babe Ruth Award, and Jonathan Papelbon of the Boston Red Sox was the first winner since the award criteria changed to cover the entire postseason. In all, members of the Yankees have won the award sixteen times. Luis Tiant is the only winner of the Babe Ruth Award to play for the World Series–losing team. Two players, Sandy Koufax and Jack Morris, have won the award twice.

Bases on balls per 9 innings pitched

In baseball statistics, bases on balls per 9 innings pitched (BB/9IP or BB/9) or walks per nine innings (denoted by W/9) is the average number of bases on balls, (or walks) given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. It is determined by multiplying the number of bases on balls allowed by nine and dividing by the number of innings pitched. It is a measure of the bases on balls ability of a pitcher.

Brooks Lawrence

Brooks Ulysses Lawrence (January 30, 1925 – April 27, 2000) was a Major League Baseball All-Star pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals (1954–1955), Cincinnati Redlegs (1956–1959), and Cincinnati Reds (1960).

Lawrence was born in Springfield, Ohio, and attended Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. His career started in the Negro National League, where he earned the nickname "Bull".

Lawrence's Major League debut came in 1954. As a 29-year-old rookie, Lawrence went 15–6 with a 3.74 ERA while starting and relieving for the St. Louis Cardinals. He struggled in 1955 and was demoted to Oakland (in the Pacific Coast League), but he went 5–1 down the stretch and earned a second chance with the big-league club.

Lawrence's best season came in 1956. Prior to that year, St. Louis sent Lawrence and Sonny Senerchia to the Cincinnati Reds in exchange for Jackie Collum. With the Reds that season, Lawrence posted a 19–10 record and a 3.99 ERA. He opened the season with 13 consecutive wins and earned a spot on the National League All-Star team. That year he led the Reds in wins, innings pitched and shutouts.

Lawrence's career came to a close in 1960, and he retired with an overall record of 69–62 with a 4.25 ERA in 1,040.7 innings pitched. Due largely to his 13-game winning streak and his association with the surprisingly successful 1956 Reds club, Lawrence earned induction into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1976.

After his retirement from baseball, Lawrence worked for International Harvester in his hometown of Springfield, Ohio. He later worked for the Reds in scouting, minor league player development, and radio and television.

Lawrence died on April 27, 2000.

Doug Bair

Charles Douglas Bair (born August 22, 1949) is a right-handed former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. He played all or part of fifteen seasons in the majors, from 1976 until 1990, for seven different teams.

Earned run average

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and omitted from ERA calculations.

Flint Rhem

Charles Flint Rhem (January 24, 1901 – July 30, 1969), born in Rhems, South Carolina, was a pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals (1924–28, 1930–32, 1934 and 1936), Philadelphia Phillies (1932–33) and Boston Braves (1934–35).

He helped the Cardinals win the 1926 World Series, 1931 World Series, and 1934 World Series and 1928 and 1930 National League pennants.

He finished 8th in voting for the 1926 National League MVP for having a 20–7 Win–loss record, 34 Games, 34 Games Started, 20 Complete Games, 1 Shutout, 258 Innings Pitched, 241 Hits Allowed, 121 Runs Allowed, 92 Earned Runs Allowed, 12 Home Runs Allowed, 75 Walks Allowed, 72 Strikeouts, 1 Hit Batsmen, 5 Wild Pitches, 1,068 Batters Faced, 1 Balk and a 3.21 ERA.

In 12 seasons he had a 105–97 Win–Loss record, 294 Games, 229 Games Started, 91 Complete Games, 8 Shutouts, 41 Games Finished, 10 Saves, 1,725 ⅓ Innings Pitched, 1,958 Hits Allowed, 989 Runs Allowed, 805 Earned Runs Allowed, 113 Home Runs Allowed, 529 Walks Allowed, 534 Strikeouts, 20 Hit Batsmen, 33 Wild Pitches, 7,516 Batters Faced, 4 Balks and a 4.20 ERA.

Rhem died in Columbia, South Carolina at the age of 68.

George Earnshaw

George Livingston Earnshaw (February 15, 1900 – December 1, 1976) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. He played in parts of nine seasons (1928–36) with the Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago White Sox, Brooklyn Dodgers, and St. Louis Cardinals. He was the American League wins leader in 1929 with the A's. For his career, he compiled a 127–93 record in 319 appearances, with a 4.38 ERA and 1,002 strikeouts. Earnshaw played on three American League pennant winners with the Athletics, winning the World Series in 1929 and 1930.

Born in New York City, Earnshaw grew to be 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m) tall and 210 pounds (95 kg), earning him the nickname "Moose". He was aggressive, threw hard, and threw strikes. His career covered nine years with a total of 127 victories, and over half of Earnshaw's victories occurred during the A's pennant winning years 1929–31. He won four World Series games, starting eight games with five being complete games. He struck out 56 batters in 62 innings pitched and had an earn run average for the three Series of 1.58. Connie Mack gave more credit to Earnshaw for the Athletics' 1930 World Series victory over the St. Louis Cardinals than any other player.

Earnshaw did not reach the major leagues until he was 28 years old. A graduate of Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, he was a pitching star for the minor league Baltimore Orioles when Connie Mack purchased his contract in June 1928. That season, the A's finished second in the American League, 2½ games behind the Yankees. Moose had a record of 7–7 with a 3.85 ERA and 117 strikeouts in 158 innings pitched. It was in 1929 that Earnshaw and Lefty Grove began to dominate big league hitters. For the next three years, they were the only two pitchers on any one team to win 20 or more games. The 1929 season was George's turn to shine. His 24 victories against 8 losses was the most in the majors, and his 149 strikeouts were second only to teammate Grove in the American League and third in the majors. His fastball being wild at times, Earnshaw's 125 walks were an American League high, but his 3.28 ERA was among the best.

By 1936, Earnshaw's career came to an end with the St. Louis Cardinals and old nemesis Pepper Martin. Within a few years, George became a commander in the Navy in World War II. On December 1, 1976, Earnshaw died in Little Rock, Arkansas. He currently ranks seventh in Athletics franchise history in winning percentage (.627).

George McQuillan

George Watt McQuillan (May 1, 1885 – March 30, 1940), born in Brooklyn, New York, was a pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies (1907–10 and 1915–16), Cincinnati Reds (1911), Pittsburgh Pirates (1913–15) and Cleveland Indians (1918).

In 1907 he set one of the longest-lived records in major league history when he pitched 25 innings before giving up the first earned run of his career. Although others have pitched more consecutive innings without an earned run, until July 2008 no one had gone longer without prior major league experience. The record stood for 101 years before being broken by Oakland Athletics reliever Brad Ziegler, who extended the record to 39​1⁄3 innings.

McQuillan's extraordinary success as a rookie was no fluke: he posted a 1.69 ERA in his first four seasons, comprising more than 800 innings pitched; during those years his Adjusted ERA+ (the ratio of the league's ERA, adjusted to the pitcher's ballpark, to that of the pitcher) was a staggering 164. In 1910, he would have led the majors with an Adjusted ERA+ of 195 had he pitched only an additional 1​2⁄3 innings to meet the minimum requirement of 154 innings pitched.

McQuillan helped the Phillies win the 1915 National League Pennant. He is still the Philadelphia Phillies Career Leader in ERA (1.79), WHIP (1.02) and Hits Allowed/9IP (6.93). He currently ranks 23rd on the MLB Career ERA List (2.38), 37th on the WHIP List (1.131) and 86th on the Hits Allowed/9IP List (7.89).

In 10 seasons he had an 85–89 Win–Loss record, 273 Games (173 Started), 105 Complete Games, 17 Shutouts, 76 Games Finished, 14 Saves, 1,576 ⅓ Innings Pitched, 1,382 Hits Allowed, 577 Runs Allowed, 417 Earned Runs Allowed, 23 Home Runs Allowed, 401 Walks Allowed, 590 Strikeouts, 30 Hit Batsmen, 16 Wild Pitches, 6,297 Batters Faced, a 2.38 ERA and 1.131 WHIP.

McQuillan's major league career was cut short due to his chronic alcoholism and infection by syphilis. However, he continued to play and coach in the minor leagues and semi-pro ball. He died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 54.

Hits per nine innings

In baseball statistics, hits per nine innings (denoted by H/9) is the average number of hits allowed by a pitcher in a nine inning period; calculated as: (hits allowed x 9) / innings pitched. This is a measure of a pitcher's success based on the number of all outs he records.

Compared to a pitcher's batting average against, a pitcher's H/9 benefits from sacrifice bunts, double plays, runners caught stealing, and outfield assists, but it is hurt by some errors. Unlike batting average against, a pitcher's H/9 benefits from outs that are not related to official at bats, as they are recorded on runners after they have reached base.

Jon Lieber

Jonathan Ray Lieber (born April 2, 1970) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. He stands 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and weighs 240 pounds (110 kg). He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1994–1998), Chicago Cubs (1999–2002 and 2008), New York Yankees (2004), and Philadelphia Phillies (2005–2007). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed, and utilized a fastball, a slider, and a changeup for his pitches. In a 14-season career, Lieber compiled a 131–124 record with 1,553 strikeouts and a 4.27 ERA in 2,198 innings pitched.

Lieber attended the University of South Alabama, helping them win the Sun Belt Conference Championship. He was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in the second round of the 1992 Major League Baseball Draft, but he was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates the following season before even throwing a pitch in the major leagues. He made his debut in 1994 and was named the Pirates' Opening Day starter in 1995, but it was not until 1997 that he became a full-time major league starter. He was traded to the Chicago Cubs following the 1998 season. In 2000, he led the National League (NL) with 251 innings pitched. He had his best season in 2001, winning 20 games while losing just six. Lieber underwent Tommy John surgery in 2002 and missed the entire 2003 season. In 2004, he pitched for the New York Yankees, reaching the playoffs for the only time in his career. He signed with the Philadelphia Phillies in 2005 and tied for fifth in the NL with 17 wins. Injuries cut into his playing time over the next three years; he finished his career as a reliever with the Cubs in 2008.

Kent Tekulve

Kenton Charles "Teke" Tekulve (born March 5, 1947) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed relief pitcher. During his 16 seasons in MLB, he pitched for three teams, but spent most of his career with the Pittsburgh Pirates. Pitching with an unusual submarine delivery, he was known as a workhorse relief pitcher who holds several records for number of games pitched and innings pitched.

List of Boston Red Sox team records

The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team based in Boston, Massachusetts. They have competed in the American League (AL) since it was founded in 1901, and in the AL East division since it was formed in 1969. Note that before 1908, the team was known as the Boston Americans. The list below documents players and teams that hold particular club records.

List of Major League Baseball career innings pitched leaders

In baseball, innings pitched (IP) are the number of innings a pitcher has completed, measured by the number of batters and baserunners that are put out while the pitcher is on the pitching mound in a game. Three outs made is equal to one inning pitched. One out counts as one-third of an inning, and two outs counts as two-thirds of an inning.

This is a list of the top 100 Major League Baseball pitchers who have accumulated the most innings pitched of all time.

Cy Young is the all-time leader in innings pitched with 7,356, and the only pitcher to throw more than 7,000 innings. Pud Gavin is the only other pitcher in MLB history to throw more than 6,000 innings.

Major League Baseball Rookie of the Year Award

In Major League Baseball, the Rookie of the Year Award is annually given to one player from each league as voted on by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). The award was established in 1940 by the Chicago chapter of the BBWAA, which selected an annual winner from 1940 through 1946. The award became national in 1947; Jackie Robinson, the Brooklyn Dodgers' second baseman, won the inaugural award. One award was presented for both leagues in 1947 and 1948; since 1949, the honor has been given to one player each in the National and American League. Originally, the award was known as the J. Louis Comiskey Memorial Award, named after the Chicago White Sox owner of the 1930s. The award was renamed the Jackie Robinson Award in July 1987, 40 years after Jackie Robinson broke the baseball color line.

Of the 140 players named Rookie of the Year (as of 2016), 16 have been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame—Jackie Robinson, five American League players, and ten others from the National League. The award has been shared twice: once by Butch Metzger and Pat Zachry of the National League in 1976; and once by John Castino and Alfredo Griffin of the American League in 1979. Members of the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers have won the most awards of any franchise (with 18), twice the total of the New York Yankees, and members of the Philadelphia and Oakland Athletics (eight), who have produced the most in the American League. Fred Lynn and Ichiro Suzuki are the only two players who have been named Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player in the same year, and Fernando Valenzuela is the only player to have won Rookie of the Year and the Cy Young Award in the same year. Sam Jethroe is the oldest player to have won the award, at age 32, 33 days older than 2000 winner Kazuhiro Sasaki (also 32). Shohei Ohtani of the Los Angeles Angels and Ronald Acuña Jr. of the Atlanta Braves are the most recent winners.

Ray Kremer

Remy Peter "Ray" Kremer (March 23, 1893 – February 8, 1965) was a professional baseball player. He was a pitcher over parts of ten seasons (1924–1933), all with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Kremer had a remarkable beginning to his big-league career. He posted an 18-10 record as a rookie in 1924, then followed that with seasons of 17-8, 20-6 and 19-8. He was third in the vote for the National League's most valuable player in 1926.

The Pirates won a pair of pennants during that stretch. Kremer threw two complete games in the 1925 World Series against the Washington Senators, and after winning Game 6 with a six-hitter, Kremer was brought back for four innings of relief in Game 7 and ended up the winning pitcher in that game as well. He also made one start in the 1927 World Series, chosen to pitch Game 1 against a New York Yankees team thought by many to be the greatest baseball team of all time.

He led the National League in ERA in both 1926 and 1927.

Kremer put up some of the most impressive numbers of his career in 1930, leading the league in wins (20), games started (38) and innings pitched (276).

For his career, he compiled a 143–85 record in 308 appearances, with a 3.76 ERA and 516 strikeouts. Kremer's 143 wins with Pittsburgh rank him eighth in franchise history, his .627 winning percentage ranks seventh, and his 1,954​2⁄3 innings pitched rank tenth.

He was born in Oakland, California, and later died in Pinole, California, at the age of 71.

Strikeouts per 9 innings pitched

In baseball statistics, strikeouts per 9 innings pitched (K/9, SO/9, or SO/9IP) is the mean of strikeouts (or Ks) by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. It is determined by multiplying the number of strikeouts by nine and dividing by the number of innings pitched. To qualify, a pitcher must have pitched 1,000 innings, which generally limits the list to starters. A separate list is maintained for relievers with 300 innings pitched or 200 appearances.

The all-time leader in this statistic is Chris Sale (10.84). The only other players who have averaged over 10 (as of August 20, 2018) are Randy Johnson (10.61),Stephen Strasburg (10.55), Kerry Wood (10.32), Max Scherzer (10.35) and Pedro Martínez (10.04).Among qualifying relievers, Rob Dibble (12.17) is the all-time leader in strikeouts per nine innings. Active leader David Robertson (12.03), Craig Kimbrel (14.7) and Aroldis Chapman (15.3) are the only other qualifying relievers averaging more than 12.

One effect of K/9 is that it may reward or "inflate" the numbers for pitchers with high batting averages on balls in play (BABIP). Two pitchers may have the same K/9 rates despite striking out a different percentage of batters since one pitcher will pitch to

more batters to obtain the same cumulative number of strikeouts. For example, a pitcher who strikes out one batter in an inning, but also gives up a walk or a hit, strikes out a lower percentage of batters than a pitcher who strikes out one batter in an inning without allowing a baserunner, but both have the same K/9.

Walks plus hits per inning pitched

In baseball statistics, walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) is a sabermetric measurement of the number of baserunners a pitcher has allowed per inning pitched. WHIP reflects a pitcher's propensity for allowing batters to reach base, therefore a lower WHIP indicates better performance. WHIP is calculated by adding the number of walks and hits allowed and dividing this sum by the number of innings pitched.The stat was invented in 1979 by writer Daniel Okrent, who called the metric "innings pitched ratio" at the time. Okrent excluded hit batsmen from the numerator of baserunners allowed since Sunday newspapers did not include hit batsmen in their statistical updates. WHIP near 1.00 or lower over the course of a season will often rank among the league leaders in Major League Baseball (MLB).

While earned run average (ERA) measures the runs a pitcher gives up, WHIP more directly measures a pitcher's effectiveness against batters. WHIP accounts for pitcher performance regardless of errors and unearned runs.

WHIP is one of the few sabermetric statistics to enter mainstream baseball usage. On-base plus slugging, or OPS, a comparable measurement of the ability of a hitter, is another example of comparison. In addition to its use in live games, the WHIP is one of the most commonly used statistics in fantasy baseball and is standard in fantasy leagues that employ 4×4, 5×5, and 6×6 formats.

The lowest single-season WHIP in MLB history is 0.7373 from Pedro Martínez pitching for the Boston Red Sox in 2000, which broke the previous record of 0.77 from Guy Hecker of the Louisville Eclipse. Cleveland Indians right-handed pitcher Addie Joss currently holds the MLB record for the lowest career WHIP, with a 0.9678 WHIP in 2,327 innings. Chicago White Sox spitballer Ed Walsh and Los Angeles Dodgers left-handed pitcher Clayton Kershaw are tied for second, with a 0.9996 WHIP in 2,964 innings and 1,831+ innings respectively, the lowest career WHIP for a qualified pitcher with 10 or more seasons pitched. Reliever Mariano Rivera ranks third among qualified pitchers with a career WHIP of 1.000 in 1,283​2⁄3 innings. Providence Grays and New York Gothams right-hander Monte Ward is fourth all time with a career WHIP of 1.0435.

World Series Most Valuable Player Award

The Willie Mays World Series Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is given to the player deemed to have the most impact on his team's performance in the World Series, which is the final round of the Major League Baseball (MLB) postseason. The award was first presented in 1955 as the SPORT Magazine Award, but is now decided during the final game of the Series by a committee of reporters and officials present at the game. On September 29, 2017, it was renamed in honor of Willie Mays in remembrance of the 63rd anniversary of The Catch. Mays never won the award himself.

Pitchers have been named Series MVP twenty-seven times; four of them were relief pitchers. Twelve of the first fourteen World Series MVPs were won by pitchers; from 1969 until 1986, the proportion of pitcher MVPs declined—Rollie Fingers (1974) and Bret Saberhagen (1985) were the only two pitchers to win the award in this period. From 1987 until 1991, all of the World Series MVPs were pitchers, and, since 1995, pitchers have won the award nine times. Bobby Richardson of the 1960 New York Yankees is the only player in World Series history to be named MVP despite being on the losing team.

The most recent winner was Steve Pearce of the Boston Red Sox, who won the award in 2018.

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