Inmigrante TV

Inmigrante TV is a United States television network featuring political news and commentary aimed at Hispanic immigrants.

The station was founded in 2010 by immigration attorney Manuel Solis. Much of the programming consists of advertising for Solis' law firm.

It was broadcast on the following digital subchannels:

Inmigrante TV
TypeBroadcast digital television network
AvailabilityNationwide, though not in every market
MottoNoticias – Inmigración – La Reforma
SloganSomos una sola voz
Key people
Manuel Solis; Roberto Repreza, Marina Gil, Carolina Sanford, Juan Ignacio Rosales, Dagoberto Urbina, Diana Briceño, Carlos Cesteros.
Launch date
February 19, 2010
Official website
http://www.inmigrantetv.com

References

Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex

The Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex (officially designated the Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget) encompasses 13 counties within the U.S. state of Texas. Residents of the area also refer to it as DFW, or the Metroplex. It is the economic and cultural hub of the region of North (North Central) Texas, and it is the largest inland metropolitan area in the United States.The Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex's population is 7,539,711 according to the 2018 U.S. Census estimate, making it the largest metropolitan area in both Texas and the South, the fourth-largest in the U.S., and the tenth-largest in the Americas. In 2016, DFW ascended to the number one spot in the nation in year-over-year population growth. In 2016, the metropolitan economy surpassed Houston to become the fourth-largest in the nation, currently the region boasts a GDP of just over $613.4 billion in 2019. As such, the metropolitan area's economy is ranked 10th largest in the world.

The region's economy is primarily based on banking, commerce, telecommunications, technology, energy, healthcare and medical research, and transportation and logistics. In 2019, Dallas–Fort Worth is home to (25) Fortune 500 companies, the third-largest concentration of Fortune 500 companies in the nation, behind New York City (70) and Chicago (34). The metroplex encompasses 9,286 square miles (24,100 km2) of total area: 8,991 sq mi (23,290 km2) is land, while 295 sq mi (760 km2) is water, making it larger in area than the states of Rhode Island and Connecticut combined.

KRCA

KRCA, virtual channel 62 (VHF digital channel 7), is an Estrella TV owned-and-operated television station serving Los Angeles, California, United States that is licensed to Riverside. It is the flagship television property of Burbank-based Liberman Broadcasting. The station's studios are located on North Victory Drive (near Interstate 5) in Burbank, and its transmitter is located atop Mount Wilson.

List of Spanish-language television networks in the United States

The following is a list of Spanish-language television networks in the United States. As of 2016 the largest Hispanic/Latino television audiences in the U.S. are in California (Los Angeles, San Francisco area), New York, Florida (Miami area), Texas (Houston, Dallas, Ft. Worth, San Antonio), Illinois (Chicago), and Arizona (Phoenix).

List of United States over-the-air television networks

In the United States, for most of the history of broadcasting, there were only three or four major commercial national terrestrial networks. From 1946 to 1956, these were ABC, CBS, NBC and DuMont (though the Paramount Television Network had some limited success during these years). From 1956 to 1986, the "Big Three" national commercial networks were ABC, CBS, and NBC (with a few limited attempts to challenge them, such as National Telefilm Associates [and its NTA Film Network] and the Overmyer Network). From 1954 to 1970, National Educational Television was the national clearinghouse for public TV programming; the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) succeeded it in 1970.

Today, more than fifty national free-to-air networks exist. Other than the non-commercial educational (NCE) PBS, which is composed of member stations, the largest terrestrial television networks are the traditional Big Three television networks (ABC, CBS and NBC). Many other large networks exist, however, notably Fox and The CW which air original programming for two hours each night instead of three like the original "Big Three" do, as well as syndication services like MyNetworkTV and Ion Television which feature reruns of recent popular shows with little to no original programming. Fox has just about the same household reach percentage as the Big Three, and is therefore often considered a peer to ABC, NBC, and CBS since it has also achieved equal or better ratings since the late 1990s. Most media outlets now include Fox in what they refer to as the "Big Four" TV networks.

The transition to digital broadcasting in 2009 has allowed for television stations to offer additional programming options through digital subchannels, one or more supplementary programming streams to the station's primary channel that are achieved through multiplexing of a station's signal. A number of new commercial networks airing specialty programming such as movies, reruns of classic series and lifestyle programs have been created from companies like Weigel Broadcasting, Luken Communications and even owners of the major networks such as Fox Corporation, National Amusements (through the CBS Corporation subsidiary), The Walt Disney Company (through the Walt Disney Television subsidiary) and Comcast (through the NBCUniversal subsidiary). Through the use of multicasting, there have also been a number of new Spanish-language and non-commercial public TV networks that have launched.

Free-to-air networks in the U.S. can be divided into four categories:

Commercial networks – which air English-language programming to a general audience (for example, CBS);

Spanish-language networks – fully programmed networks which air Spanish-language programming to a primarily Latin American audience (for example, Telemundo and Univision);

Educational and other non-commercial broadcast networks – which air English- and some foreign-language television programming, intended to be educational in nature or otherwise of a sort not found on commercial television (for example, PBS);

Religious broadcast networks – which air religious study and other faith-based programs, and in some cases, family-oriented secular programs (for example, Daystar).Each network sends its signal to many local affiliate television stations across the country. These local stations then air the "network feed," with programs broadcast by each network being viewed by up to tens of millions of households across the country. In the case of the largest networks, the signal is sent to over 200 stations. In the case of the smallest networks, the signal may be sent to just a dozen or fewer stations.

As of the 2016–17 television season, there are an estimated 118.4 million households in the U.S. with at least one TV set.

List of television stations in Illinois

This is a list of broadcast television stations in the U.S. state of Illinois.

List of television stations in New Mexico

This is a list of broadcast television stations serving cities in the U.S. state of New Mexico. This list does not include all of the state's many television translators and low-power transmitters.

Many Albuquerque-based or Santa Fe-based network affiliates have satellite stations in other cities. New Mexico, excluding Doña Ana County, makes up most of the Albuquerque-Santa Fe broadcast market.

Media in Chicago

The Chicago metropolitan area (the Chicago Market) commands the third-largest media market in the United States after New York City and Los Angeles and the largest inland market. All of the major U.S. television networks have subsidiaries in Chicago. WGN-TV, which is owned by the Tribune Media Company, is carried (with some programming differences) as "WGN America" on cable and satellite nationwide. Sun-Times Media Group is also headquartered in Chicago, which, along with the Tribune Media Company, are some the largest owners of daily newspapers in the country.

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