Information Today

Information Today is a publisher of several Internet and technology magazines, newsletters, and books geared toward the library and information and knowledge management community. Their publications are widely cited by information professionals in the fields of government, education, and information technology.[2][3][4] The company also coordinates several conferences for technology and library science professionals.[5]

Information Today
Founded1983[1]
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationMedford, New Jersey, United States
Publication typesMagazines, newsletters, and books
Nonfiction topicsInternet, knowledge management, library science
ImprintsPlexus, CyberAge Books
No. of employees150
Official websitewww.infotoday.com

Publications

Magazines

  • Big Data Quarterly
  • Computers in Libraries
  • RM Magazine
  • EContent
  • EventDV (formerly EMedia)
  • Information Today (ISSN 8755-6286)
  • KMWorld
  • Link-Up/Link-Up Digital
  • Internet@Schools
  • Online Searcher – a 2013 merger of Online and Searcher
  • Speech Technology
  • Streaming Media

Newsletters

  • CyberSkeptic's Guide to Internet Research
  • The Information Advisor’s Guide to Internet Research
  • MLS – Marketing Library Services

Conferences

  • Internet Librarian
  • Internet Librarian International
  • Computers in Libraries
  • CRM Evolution
  • SpeechTEK
  • Data Summit
  • KMWorld Conference and Exhibition
  • Streaming Media East and Streaming Media West
  • Streaming Forum (United Kingdom)
  • Taxonomy Boot Camp
  • Taxonomy Boot Camp London

Books

  • Information Today Books
    • CyberAge Books
  • Plexus Publishing
    • Medford Books

References

  1. ^ "Information Today". www.crunchbase.com. Crunchbase. Retrieved 21 August 2018.
  2. ^ "QuestionPoint: Journeys in a Digital World with Diane Kresh (Journeys and Crossings, Library of Congress Digital Reference Section)". 2002.
  3. ^ Nancy K Herther (2013). "PRISM and the First Amendment: A Critical Issue: NewsBreaks – Experts @Minnesota".
  4. ^ Roy Rosenzweig (2011). Clio Wired: The Future of the Past in the Digital Age.
  5. ^ Mark Liberman (2004). "Voice Writing".

External links

Academic journal

An academic or scholarly journal is a periodical publication in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published. Academic journals serve as permanent and transparent forums for the presentation, scrutiny, and discussion of research. They are usually peer-reviewed or refereed. Content typically takes the form of articles presenting original research, review articles, and book reviews. The purpose of an academic journal, according to Henry Oldenburg (the first editor of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society), is to give researchers a venue to "impart their knowledge to one another, and contribute what they can to the Grand design of improving natural knowledge, and perfecting all Philosophical Arts, and Sciences."The term academic journal applies to scholarly publications in all fields; this article discusses the aspects common to all academic field journals. Scientific journals and journals of the quantitative social sciences vary in form and function from journals of the humanities and qualitative social sciences; their specific aspects are separately discussed.

The first academic journal was Journal des sçavans (January 1665), followed soon after by Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (March 1665), and Mémoires de l'Académie des Sciences (1666). The first fully peer-reviewed journal was Medical Essays and Observations (1733).

All About Jazz

All About Jazz is a website established by Michael Ricci in 1995. A volunteer staff publishes news, album reviews, articles, videos, and listings of concerts and other events having to do with jazz. Ricci maintains a related site, Jazz Near You, about local concerts and events.

The Jazz Journalists Association voted All About Jazz Best Website Covering Jazz for thirteen consecutive years between 2003 and 2015, when the category was retired. In 2015, Ricci said the site received a peak of 1.3 million readers per month in 2007. Another source said that the site has over 500,000 readers around the world.Ricci was born in Philadelphia. He heard classical and jazz from his father's music collection. He played trumpet and went to his first jazz concert when he was eight. With a background in computer programming, he combined his interest in jazz and the internet by creating the All About Jazz website in 1995.The website publishes reviews, interviews, and articles pertaining to jazz in the U.S. and around the world, including information about festivals, concerts, and other events.In 2016, Ricci was given the Jazz Bridge Ambassador Award for his contributions to jazz in Philadelphia.

Creative Commons

Creative Commons (CC) is an American non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share. The organization has released several copyright-licenses, known as Creative Commons licenses, free of charge to the public. These licenses allow creators to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for the benefit of recipients or other creators. An easy-to-understand one-page explanation of rights, with associated visual symbols, explains the specifics of each Creative Commons license. Creative Commons licenses do not replace copyright but are based upon it. They replace individual negotiations for specific rights between copyright owner (licensor) and licensee, which are necessary under an "all rights reserved" copyright management, with a "some rights reserved" management employing standardized licenses for re-use cases where no commercial compensation is sought by the copyright owner. The result is an agile, low-overhead and low-cost copyright-management regime, benefiting both copyright owners and licensees.

The organization was founded in 2001 by Lawrence Lessig, Hal Abelson, and Eric Eldred with the support of Center for the Public Domain. The first article in a general interest publication about Creative Commons, written by Hal Plotkin, was published in February 2002. The first set of copyright licenses was released in December 2002. The founding management team that developed the licenses and built the Creative Commons infrastructure as we know it today included Molly Shaffer Van Houweling, Glenn Otis Brown, Neeru Paharia, and Ben Adida.In 2002 the Open Content Project, a 1998 precursor project by David A. Wiley, announced the Creative Commons as successor project and Wiley joined as CC director. Aaron Swartz played a role in the early stages of Creative Commons, as did Matthew Haughey.As of May 2018 there were an estimated 1.4 billion works licensed under the various Creative Commons licenses. Wikipedia uses one of these licenses. As of May 2018, Flickr alone hosts over 415 million Creative Commons licensed photos.Creative Commons is governed by a board of directors. Their licenses have been embraced by many as a way for creators to take control of how they choose to share their copyrighted works.

Credo Reference

Credo Reference or Credo (formerly Xrefer) is an American company that offers online reference content by subscription and partners with libraries to develop information-literacy programs or produce library marketing plans and materials. Founded in 1999, Credo Reference provides full-text online versions of over 3,500 published reference works from more than 100 publishers in a variety of major subjects. These include general and subject dictionaries as well as encyclopedias. The company's customers are libraries, library systems, k-12 schools, and universities, which subscribe to the service for their patrons' use.In 2010, a review of general reference sources by Library Journal focused on Credo Reference and three similar services. The review noted Credo Reference’s internal linking within the site from one reference work to another.

Ei Compendex

Ei Compendex is an engineering bibliographic database published by Elsevier.

It indexes scientific literature pertaining to engineering materials. Beginning in 1884, it was compiled by hand under the original title of Engineering Index.

The name "Compendex" stands for COMPuterized ENgineering inDEX.

As a result of computerization in 1967, the first electronic Engineering Index bulletin was sent to 500 subscribers.

Elsevier purchased the parent company Engineering Information in 1998.

Encyclopedia.com

Encyclopedia.com (also known as HighBeam Encyclopedia) is an online encyclopedia. It aggregates information from other published dictionaries, encyclopedias and reference works including pictures and videos. It received Codie awards in 2009 and 2010. The website is operated by Chicago based company Highbeam Research a subsidiary of reference publisher Gale itself a subsidiary of Cengage.Encyclopedia.com allows users to access information on a subject from multiple encyclopedias and dictionary sources, and has nearly 200,000 entries and 50,000 topic summaries. It provides a collection of online encyclopedias and entries from various sources, including Oxford University Press, Columbia Encyclopedia and Gale its parent company.The website was launched by Infonautics in March 1998. Infonautics was acquired by Tucows in August 2001. In August 2002, Patrick Spain bought Encyclopedia.com and its sister website eLibrary from Tucows and incorporated them in a new company called Alacritude, LLC (a combination of Alacrity and Attitude). The business became known as Highbeam Research and was eventually sold to Gale.

Factiva

Factiva is a business information and research tool owned by Dow Jones & Company. Factiva aggregates content from both licensed and free sources, and provides organizations with search, alerting, dissemination, and other information management capabilities. Factiva products provide access to more than 32,000 sources (such as newspapers, journals, magazines, television and radio transcripts, photos, etc.) from nearly every country worldwide in 28 languages, including more than 600 continuously updated newswires.

Index (publishing)

An index (plural: usually indexes, more rarely indices; see below) is a list of words or phrases ('headings') and associated pointers ('locators') to where useful material relating to that heading can be found in a document or collection of documents. Examples are an index in the back matter of a book and an index that serves as a library catalog.

In a traditional back-of-the-book index, the headings will include names of people, places, events, and concepts selected by the indexer as being relevant and of interest to a possible reader of the book. The indexer may be the author, the editor, or a professional indexer working as a third party. The pointers are typically page numbers, paragraph numbers or section numbers.

In a library catalog the words are authors, titles, subject headings, etc., and the pointers are call numbers. Internet search engines (such as Google) and full-text searching help provide access to information but are not as selective as an index, as they provide non-relevant links, and may miss relevant information if it is not phrased in exactly the way they expect.Perhaps the most advanced investigation of problems related to book indexes is made in the development of topic maps, which started as a way of representing the knowledge structures inherent in traditional back-of-the-book indexes. The concept embodied by book indexes lent its name to database indexes, which similarly provide an abridged way to look up information in a larger collection, albeit one for computer use rather than human use.

Near-threatened species

A near-threatened species is a species which has been categorized as "Near Threatened" (NT) by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as that may be considered threatened with extinction in the near future, although it does not currently qualify for the threatened status. The IUCN notes the importance of re-evaluating near-threatened taxon at appropriate intervals.

The rationale used for near-threatened taxa usually includes the criteria of vulnerable which are plausible or nearly met, such as reduction in numbers or range. Near-threatened species evaluated from 2001 onwards may also be ones which are dependent on conservation efforts to prevent their becoming threatened, whereas prior to this conservation-dependent species were given a separate category ("Conservation Dependent").

Additionally, the 402 conservation-dependent taxa may also be considered near-threatened.

NewsBank

NewsBank is a news database resource which provides archives of media publications as reference materials to libraries.

Northern Light Group

Northern Light Group, LLC is a company specializing in strategic research portals, enterprise search technology, and text analytics solutions. The company provides custom, hosted, turnkey solutions for its clients using the software as a service (SaaS) delivery model. Northern Light markets its strategic research portals under the tradename SinglePoint. Typical applications for SinglePoint strategic research portals are in market research, competitive intelligence, product management, product development, and technology research. Northern Light's client base consists of global companies that typically have more than $10 billion in annual sales. Companies that have stated publicly that they use SinglePoint research portals from Northern Light include HP, Verizon, Symantec, SAP, and Cisco.Northern Light has been picked for six years in a row (as of 2009) as one of the "100 Companies That Matter In Knowledge Management" by KMWorld magazine.According to the industry trade magazine Information Today, Northern Light is innovating the automated analysis and extraction of meaning from large repositories of market intelligence documents.

PLOS

PLOS (for Public Library of Science) is a nonprofit open-access science, technology and medicine publisher, innovator and advocacy organization with a library of open-access journals and other scientific literature under an open-content license. It launched its first journal, PLOS Biology, in October 2003 and publishes seven journals, as of October 2015. The organization is based in San Francisco, California, and has a European editorial office in Cambridge, England. The publications are primarily funded by payments from the authors.

ScienceDaily

Science Daily is an American website that aggregates press releases and publishes lightly edited press releases (a practice called churnalism) about science, similar to Phys.org and EurekAlert!.The site was founded by married couple Dan and Michele Hogan in 1995; Dan Hogan formerly worked in the public affairs department of Jackson Laboratory writing press releases. The site makes money from selling advertisements. As of 2010, the site said that it had grown "from a two-person operation to a full-fledged news business with worldwide contributors" but at the time, it was run out of the Hogans' home, had no reporters, and only reprinted press releases. In 2012, Quantcast ranked it at 614 with 2.6 million U.S. visitors.

Screencast

A screencast is a digital recording of computer screen output, also known as a video screen capture, often containing audio narration. The term screencast compares with the related term screenshot; whereas screenshot generates a single picture of a computer screen, a screencast is essentially a movie of the changes over time that a user sees on a computer screen, enhanced with audio narration.

Software and Information Industry Association

The Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA) is a trade association dedicated to the entertainment, consumer and business software industries. Established in 1984 as the Software Publishers Association (SPA), the SIIA took its new name when it merged with the related Information Industry Association on January 1, 1999. The joint enterprise was headed by Software Publishers Association founder Ken Wasch and operated out of the SPA's existing offices.The SPA was active in lobbying, industry research and anti-piracy efforts. Its head of research, Ann Stephens, went on to found PC Data in 1991. By 1995, the SPA had over 1,100 software companies in its membership and according to Wired was among "the most powerful computer-related trade groups" before its merger with the Information Industry Association. While Microsoft became a member of the SPA in 1986, it split with the SIIA in 2000 after the group sided against Microsoft in United States v. Microsoft Corp. The Wall Street Journal described Microsoft as the SIIA's "largest member" before the departure.Until 1999, the Software Publishers Association hosted the SPA Annual Conference for software companies. It was renamed the InfoSoft Essentials conference in 1999.

Thomson Reuters

Thomson Reuters Corporation () is a Canadian multinational mass media and information firm. The firm was founded in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, where it is headquartered at 333 Bay Street in Downtown Toronto. Thomson Reuters shares are cross listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: TRI) and the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE: TRI).

Thomson Reuters was created by the Thomson Corporation's purchase of the British company Reuters Group in April 2008, and is majority owned by The Woodbridge Company, a holding company for the Thomson family. Thomson Reuters was ranked as Canada's "leading corporate brand" in the 2010 Interbrand Best Canadian Brands ranking. Thomson Reuters operates in more than 100 countries, and has more than 45,000 employees.

Web of Science

Web of Science (previously known as Web of Knowledge) is an online subscription-based scientific citation indexing service originally produced by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), later maintained by Clarivate Analytics (previously the Intellectual Property and Science business of Thomson Reuters), that provides a comprehensive citation search. It gives access to multiple databases that reference cross-disciplinary research, which allows for in-depth exploration of specialized sub-fields within an academic or scientific discipline.

World News Network

World News (WN) Network is a news aggregator founded in March 1995 and launched online in 1998. In 2003, Search Engine Watch praised the service for its "Special Reports", and called it "an interesting alternative" to other news aggregation services. The company runs other targeted websites as well. It was featured in Forbes's "Best of the Web" in 2000, being commended for its scope, while being criticised for having many links, but "little guidance as to which are good". In 2002, The Guardian's "World news guide" referenced the website. It was featured in Information Today in June 2011.

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