Influenza A virus subtype H1N2

H1N2 is a subtype of the species Influenza A virus (sometimes called bird flu virus). It is currently endemic in both human and pig populations.

H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 are the only known Influenza A virus subtypes currently circulating among humans.

The virus does not cause more severe illness than other influenza viruses, and no unusual increases in influenza activity have been associated with it.

Influenza A virus subtype H1N2
Virus classification
(unranked): Virus
Phylum: Negarnaviricota
Class: Insthoviricetes
Order: Articulavirales
Family: Orthomyxoviridae
Genus: Alphainfluenzavirus
Species: Influenza A virus
Serotype: Influenza A virus subtype H1N2

History

Between December 1988 and March 1989, 19 influenza H1N2 virus isolates were identified in 6 cities in China, but the virus did not spread further.[1]

A(H1N2) was identified during the 2001–02 flu season (northern hemisphere) in Canada, the U.S., Ireland, Latvia, France, Romania, Oman, India, Malaysia, and Singapore with earliest documented outbreak of the virus occurring in India on May 31, 2001.

On February 6, 2002, the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva and the Public Health Laboratory Service (PHLS) in the United Kingdom reported the identification influenza A(H1N2) virus from humans in the UK, Israel, and Egypt.

The 2001–02 Influenza A(H1N2) Wisconsin strain appears to have resulted from the reassortment of the genes of the currently circulating influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) subtypes.

Because the hemagglutinin protein of the virus is similar to that of the currently circulating A(H1N1) viruses and the neuraminidase protein is similar to that of the current A(H3N2) viruses, the seasonal flu vaccine should provide good protection against influenza virus as well as protection against the currently circulating seasonal A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and B viruses.

Between December 2010 and January 2011, there have been cases in China, but the virus is spreading further. 19 people have died, while tens of thousands are currently sick.

New case of H1N2 was found on a Minnesota baby in December 2011.[2]

References

  1. ^ Guo, YJ; Xu, XY; Cox, NJ (1992). "Human influenza A (H1N2) viruses isolated from China". The Journal of General Virology. 73 (2): 383–7. doi:10.1099/0022-1317-73-2-383. PMID 1538194
  2. ^ "Infant In Minn. Develops H1N2, Unique Type Of H1N1". WCCO. 2011-12-12. Retrieved 9 January 2013.

External links

Influenza A virus

Influenza A virus causes influenza in birds and some mammals, and is the only species of the Alphainfluenzavirus genus of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses. Strains of all subtypes of influenza A virus have been isolated from wild birds, although disease is uncommon. Some isolates of influenza A virus cause severe disease both in domestic poultry and, rarely, in humans. Occasionally, viruses are transmitted from wild aquatic birds to domestic poultry, and this may cause an outbreak or give rise to human influenza pandemics.Influenza A viruses are negative-sense, single-stranded, segmented RNA viruses.

The several subtypes are labeled according to an H number (for the type of hemagglutinin) and an N number (for the type of neuraminidase). There are 18 different known H antigens (H1 to H18) and 11 different known N antigens (N1 to N11). H17N10 was isolated from fruit bats in 2012. H18N11 was discovered in a Peruvian bat in 2013.Each virus subtype has mutated into a variety of strains with differing pathogenic profiles; some are pathogenic to one species but not others, some are pathogenic to multiple species.

A filtered and purified influenza A vaccine for humans has been developed, and many countries have stockpiled it to allow a quick administration to the population in the event of an avian influenza pandemic. Avian influenza is sometimes called avian flu, and colloquially, bird flu. In 2011, researchers reported the discovery of an antibody effective against all types of the influenza A virus.

Timeline of influenza

This is a timeline of influenza, briefly describing major events such as outbreaks, epidemics, pandemics, discoveries and developments of vaccines. In addition to specific year/period-related events, there's the seasonal flu that kills between 250,000 and 500,000 people every year, and has claimed between 340 million and 1 billion human lives throughout history.

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