Indonesian military ranks

The Indonesian National Armed Forces (TNI) uses a simplified ranking system for the three branches of Indonesian Army, Indonesian Navy and Indonesian Air Force. Most of the ranks are similar with differences for the rank titles of the high-ranking officers. Exception exists, however, in the ranks of the service members of the Indonesian Marine Corps. While Indonesian Marine Corps is a branch of the Navy, the rank titles of the Marine Corps are the same as those of the Army, but it still uses the Navy's style insignia (for lower-ranking enlisted men, blue are replacing the red colour).

As said above, all services maintain the same rank insignia and title, with the main difference for officers are that high-ranking officers use their special titles, while officers below that rank use the similar title but followed by their respective branch/corps abbreviation. For example, an Army colonel with Infantry branch use the title "Kolonel INF.", which "INF" means "Infanteri" or "Infantry"; A Navy colonel with Supply Corps background use the title "Kolonel Laut (S)", in which "S" means "Suplai" or "Supply". Also, an Air Force Colonel with Electronical Engineering Corps background use the title "Kolonel (Lek)", in which "Lek" means "Elektronika" or "Electronics". There are no differences with enlisted personnel's title for Army and Air Force, but the Navy still use the personnel's branch/corps abbreviation behind the title.

High-ranking officers use gold stars as their insignia, middle-rank officers use gold jasmine buds and lower-rank officer use gold bars. High-rank NCOs use wavy bars, NCOs use yellow chevrons, high-rank enlisted men use red chevrons (blue for Navy and Marine Corps) and lower-rank enlisted men use red bars (blue for Navy and Marine Corps).

Rank and Insignia

Ranks before 1957

The following ranks were used at the beginning of the establishment of the Tentara Keamanan Rakyat (TKR, People's Security Armed Forces) in late 1945, the basis of the present day Indonesian National Armed Forces. This first rank system, with insignia following the former Imperial Japanese practice, was used until 1957.[1]

The TKR's Ground, Air and Naval Forces, later the Indonesian Army, Air Force, and Navy, used these ranks. (The same Army ranks were also used by the nascent Indonesian Marine Corps.)

Rank category Ranks of the TKR Ground Forces (until 1948),
Ranks of the Indonesian Army (1949–57)
Ranks of the Indonesian Marine Corps (formerly Corps Mariniers 1945-1948 and later Navy Commando Corps 1948-57)
Ranks of the TKR Naval Forces (until 1948),
Ranks of the Indonesian Navy (1949–57)
Ranks of the TKR Air Force (until 1948),
Ranks of the Indonesian Air Force (1949–57)
Generals,
flag officers,
air admirals
Djenderal
(General)
Laksamana I
(Admiral)
Laksamana Udara
(Air Admiral)
Letnan Djenderal
(Lieutenant General)
Laksamana II
(Vice Admiral)
Laksamana Muda Udara
(Air Vice Admiral)
Djenderal Major
(Major General)
Laksamana III
(Rear Admiral)
Komodor Udara
(Air Commodore)
Senior officers Kolonel
(Colonel)
Kolonel Laut
(Captain)
Komodor Muda Udara
(Group Captain)
Letnan Kolonel
(Lieutenant Colonel)
Letnan Kolonel Laut
(Commander)
Opsir Udara I
(Wing Commander)
Mayor
(Major)
Mayor Laut
(Lieutenant commander)
Opsir Udara II
(Squadron Leader)
Junior officers Kapten
(Captain)
Kapten Laut
(Lieutenant)
Opsir Udara III
(Flight Lieutenant)
Letnan I
(First Lieutenant)
Letnan Laut
(Sub-lieutenant)
Opsir Muda Udara I
(Flying Officer)
Letnan II
(Second Lieutenant)
Letnan Muda Laut
(Ensign)
Opsir Muda Udara II
(Pilot Officer)
Non-commissioned officers Letnan Muda,
Pembantu Letnan (Warrant Officer)
Adjudan
(Adjutant)
Opsir Muda Udara III
(Warrant Officer,
Master Aircrew)
Sersan Major
(Sergeant Major)
Sersan Major
(Chief petty officer)
Sersan Major
(Sergeant Major)
Sersan
(Sergeant)
Sersan
(Petty Officer)
Sersan
(Sergeant)
Enlisted men,
ratings
Kopral
(Corporal)
Kopral
(Leading Seaman)
Kopral
(Corporal)
Pradjurit I
(Private First Class)
Kelasi I
(Able Seaman)
Pradjurit I
(Airman First Class)
Pradjurit II
(Private)
Kelasi II
(Seaman)
Pradjurit II
(Airman)
  • Note: Previous spelling used until 1973 was utilised.

Ranks between 1957–73

The rank system was updated by yet another Government Regulation on 22 June 1957.[2] The Army received the Brigadier General rank, the Navy flag officer ranks were replaced by new ones (Admiral, Vice Admiral, Rear Admiral and Commodore replacing Admiral 1st Class, Admiral 2nd Class and Admiral 3rd Class) and the Air Force flag officer ranks replaced to be similar with Navy (with special title "Udara"). The ranks remained Army-style in the Army and Navy and army-style ranks were formally introduced into the air force. NCOs and Enlisted ranks and ratings became different per service branch. Although the government regulation did not specifically mention rank to be used in Naval Commando Operations Corps, the rank system of Army is beginning to be used in Naval Commando Operations Corps (Marine Corps today)

  • Note: Post-1973 spelling used
Rank Category Indonesian Army,
Naval Commando Operations Corps
Indonesian Navy Indonesian Air Force
Generals,
flag officers,
air marshals
Jenderal
(General)
Laksamana
(Admiral)
Laksamana Udara
(Air Admiral)
Letnan Jenderal
(Lieutenant General)
Laksamana Madya
(Vice Admiral)
Laksamana Madya Udara
(Air Vice Admiral)
Jenderal Mayor
(Major General)
Laksamana Muda
(Rear Admiral)
Laksamana Muda Udara
(Air Rear Admiral)
Brigadir Jenderal
(Brigadier General)
Komodor
(Commodore)
Komodor Udara
(Air Commodore)
Field officers Kolonel
(Colonel)
Kolonel Laut
(Captain)
Kolonel Udara
(Colonel)
Letnan Kolonel
(Lieutenant Colonel)
Letnan Kolonel Laut
(Commander)
Letnan Kolonel Udara
(Lieutenant Colonel)
Mayor
(Major)
Mayor
(Lieutenant Commander)
Mayor Udara
(Major)
Junior grade officers Kapten
(Captain)
Kapten
(Lieutenant)
Kapten Udara
(Captain)
Letnan I
(First Lieutenant)
Letnan
(Lieutenant junior grade)
Letnan Udara I
(First Lieutenant)
Letnan II
(Second Lieutenant)
Letnan Muda
(Ensign)
Letnan Udara II
(Second Lieutenant)
Warrant officers and non-commissioned personnel Pembantu Letnan I
(Chief Warrant Officer)
Pembantu Letnan
(Warrant Officer)
Letnan Muda Udara I
(Warrant Officer Class 1)
Pembantu Letnan Calon Perwira
(Warrant Officer Class 1)
Pembantu Letnan II
(Warrant Officer Class 2)
Ajudan
(Adjutant)
Letnan Muda Udara II
(Warrant Officer Class 2)
Sersan Major
(Sergeant Major)
Sersan Major I
(Master Chief Petty Officer)
Sersan Major Udara
(Sergeant Major)
Sersan Mayor II
(Senior Chief Petty Officer)
Sersan Kepala
(Staff Sergeant)
Sersan I (Chief Petty Officer) Sersan Udara I (Flight Sergeant)
Sersan I
(Sergeant First Class)
Sersan II
(Sergeant)
Sersan II
(Petty Officer 1st Class)
Sersan Udara II
(Sergeant)
Enlisted personnel,
ratings
Kopral Kepala (Master Corporal) Kopral
(Petty Officer 2nd Class)
Kopral Udara I
(Corporal)
Kopral I
(Corporal)
Kopral II
(Lance Corporal)
Kopral Udara II
(Lance Corporal)
Prajurit Kader
(Specialist)
Kelasi I (Seaman) Prajurit Udara I
(Airman First Class)
Prajurit I
(Private First Class)
Prajurit II
(Private)
Kelasi II
(Seaman Apprentice)
Prajurit Udara II
(Airman)
Kelasi III
(Seaman Recruit)

Changes between 1973–90

Government Regulation No. 24/ 1973[3], updated the rank system once again, the changes were as follows:

  • Perwira Tinggi (General Officers, Flag Officers, and Air Officers)
    • Ranks of General, Lieutenant General, Major General, Brigadier General are used in the Army, the Naval Commando Operations Corps (Marine Corps today), and the Police.
    • Ranks of Admiral, Vice Admiral, and Rear Admiral are to be maintained in the Navy and the rank of Rear Admiral (lower half) (lit. 'First Admiral') introduced
    • Air Chief Marshal, Air Marshal, Air Vice Marshal, and Air Commodore are to be used in the Air Force
  • Perwira Menengah (Officers), used same rank system in all branches of armed forces.
  • Bintara Tinggi (Warrant Officers), used same Army rank system in all branches of armed forces.
  • Bintara (NCOs), used same rank system for in branches of armed forces.
  • Tamtama (Higher Enlisted Rank or Corporal), used Navy and Air Force rank system in all branches of the armed forces.
  • Tamtama (Lower Enlisted Rank)
    • Private is used in the Army, the Naval Commando Operations Corps (Marine Corps today), and the Air Force (equivalent to Airman)
    • Seamen is used in the Navy
    • Agent is used in the Police (later restricted to the Mobile Brigade and Water Police, all policemen in the other branches would later start directly as Sergeants)

Changes between 1990–97

During this period, there are minor changes of rank system in all branch of the armed forces, which are removal of rank of senior warrant officer and new enlisted ranks introduced (Master Corporal and Petty Officer 1st Class and Master Private, Seaman and Senior Airman). Those changes are based on Government Regulation No.6/ 1990[4].

Current ranks (1997–present)

Government Regulation No. 32/ 1997 regarding rank system of armed force,[5] was issued. The primary difference with previous regulation are new 5-star honorary rank for all branches of the armed forces was introduced and warrant officers rank was re-introduced.

The ranks and rank insignia used today come from the Armed Forces rank regulations of 1990 and 1997, themselves revisions of the first rank regulations published in 1973 to use the current system. The rank insignia were differentiated only by the background color of the shoulder board and by red piping (command) or no piping (staff) at the sides of the boards. All three branches have the same rank titles at the same paygrades, except for the Perwira Tinggi (General Officers, Flag Officers, and Air Officers) and the Tamtama (Lower Rank Enlisted) of the Navy and Air Force.

Note: Indonesia is not a member of NATO, so there is no official equivalence between the Indonesian military ranks and those defined by NATO. The displayed parallel is approximate and for illustration purposes only. Note: The Indonesian Navy has blue service uniform for wear in temperate climate, thus that uniform is seldom worn in Indonesia. When wearing such uniform, officers wear their ranks as gold stripes on their lower sleeves. The number and width of the stripes for each rank is similar to that of the United States Navy.

Commissioned officers

The rank insignia for commissioned officers for the army, navy and air force respectively.

Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer
Indonesia Indonesia
(Edit)
Grand General General Lieutenant General Major General Brigadier General Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant No equivalent
Jenderal Besar Jenderal Letnan Jenderal Mayor Jenderal Brigadir Jenderal Kolonel Letnan Kolonel Mayor Kapten Letnan Satu Letnan Dua
General of the Army General Lieutenant General Major General Brigadier General Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant
Indonesia Indonesia
(Edit)
23-TNI Navy-FADM.svg 22-TNI Navy-ADM.svg 21-TNI Navy-VADM.svg 20-TNI Navy-RADM.svg 19-TNI Navy-CDRE.svg 18-TNI Navy-CAPT.svg 17-TNI Navy-CDR.svg 16-TNI Navy-LCDR.svg 15-TNI Navy-LT.svg 14-TNI Navy-LTJG.svg 13-TNI Navy-ENS.svg
Laksamana Besar Laksamana Laksamana Madya Laksamana Muda Laksamana Pertama Kolonel Letnan Kolonel Mayor Kapten Letnan Satu Letnan Dua
Admiral of the Fleet Admiral Vice Admiral Rear Admiral Commodore Captain Commander Lieutenant Commander Lieutenant Lieutenant Junior Grade Ensign
Indonesia Indonesia
(Edit)
Grand General General Lieutenant General Major General Brigadier General Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant
Marsekal Besar Marsekal Marsekal Madya Marsekal Muda Marsekal Pertama Kolonel Letnan Kolonel Mayor Kapten Letnan Satu Letnan Dua
Marshal of the Air Force Air Chief Marshal Air Marshal Air Vice Marshal Air Commodore Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant
Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer

Enlisted

The rank insignia for enlisted personnel for the army, navy and air force respectively.

Equivalent
NATO code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
Indonesia Indonesia
(Edit)
12-TNI Army-CWO.svg 11-TNI Army-WO.svg Serma pdh ad Serka pdh ad Sertu pdh ad Serda pdh ad Kopka pdh ad Koptu pdh ad Kopda pdh ad Praka pdh ad Pratu pdh ad Prada pdh ad
Pembantu Letnan Satu Pembantu Letnan Dua Sersan Mayor Sersan Kepala Sersan Satu Sersan Dua Kopral Kepala Kopral Satu Kopral Dua Prajurit Kepala Prajurit Satu Prajurit Dua
Chief Warrant Officer Warrant Officer Sergeant Major Master Sergeant Staff Sergeant Sergeant Master corporal Corporal Lance corporal Master Private Private First Class Private
Indonesia Indonesia
(Edit)
12-TNI Navy-CWO.svg 11-TNI Navy-WO.svg Serma pdh al Serka pdh al Sertu pdh al Serda pdh al Kopka pdh al Koptu pdh al Kopda pdh al Kelasi kepala pdh al Kelasi satu pdh al Kelasi dua pdh al
Pembantu Letnan Satu Pembantu Letnan Dua Sersan Mayor Sersan Kepala Sersan Satu Sersan Dua Kopral Kepala Kopral Satu Kopral Dua Kelasi Kepala Kelasi Satu Kelasi Dua
Chief Warrant Officer Warrant Officer Master Chief Petty Officer First Class Master Chief Petty Officer Second Class Senior Chief Petty Officer Chief Petty Officer Petty Officer First Class Petty Officer Second Class Petty Officer Third Class Seaman Seaman Apprentice Seaman recruit
Indonesia Indonesia
(Edit)
12-TNI Air Force-CWO.svg 11-TNI Air Force-WO.svg Serma pdh au Serka pdh au Sertu pdh au Serda pdh au Kopka pdh au Koptu pdh au Kopda pdh au Praka pdh au Pratu pdh au Prada pdh au
Pembantu Letnan Satu Pembantu Letnan Dua Sersan Mayor Sersan Kepala Sersan Satu Sersan Dua Kopral Kepala Kopral Satu Kopral Dua Prajurit Kepala Prajurit Satu Prajurit Dua
Chief Warrant Officer Warrant Officer Sergeant Major Master Sergeant Staff Sergeant Sergeant Master Corporal Corporal Lance Corporal Senior Airman Airman First Class Airman
Equivalent
NATO Code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1

See also

Indonesian National Police Ranks

References

  1. ^ Peraturan Pemerintah No.21 Tahun 1949 Tentang Gaji Militer. Lampiran A.
  2. ^ Peraturan Pemerintah No.24 Tahun 1957 Tentang Peraturan Pangkat-pangkat Militer dalam Angkatan Perang Republik Indonesia. Lampiran A. Lembaran Negara Tahun 1957 Nomor. 65.
  3. ^ Peraturan Pemerintah No.24 Tahun 1973 Tentang Kepangkatan Militer/Polisi Dalam Angkatan Bersenjata Republik Indonesia. Peraturan Pemerintah No 24 Tahun 1973.
  4. ^ Peraturan Pemerintah No.6 Tahun 1990 Tentang Administrasi Prajurit Angkatan Bersenjata Republik Indonesia. Peraturan Pemerintah No 6 Tahun 1990.
  5. ^ Peraturan Pemerintah No.32 Tahun 1997 Tentang Administrasi Prajurit Angkatan Bersenjata Republik Indonesia. Peraturan Pemerintah No 32 Tahun 1990.

External links

Ade Supandi

Ade Supandi (born May 26, 1960) is a retired admiral in the Indonesian Navy who formerly served as its chief of staff (Indonesian: Kepala Staf Angkatan Laut, abbreviated KSAL or Kasal). Previously, he had been the General Chief of Staff of the Indonesian National Armed Forces and the commander of the navy's eastern fleet.

Index of Indonesia-related articles

The following is an alphabetical list of topics related to the Republic of Indonesia.

Indonesian Air Force

The Indonesian Air Force (Indonesian: Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Udara (TNI-AU), literally "Indonesian National Military-Air Force") is the aerial branch of the Indonesian National Armed Forces. The Indonesian Air Force is headquartered in Jakarta, Indonesia. Its order of battle is split into three Air Force Operational Commands (Komando Operasi TNI Angkatan Udara /KOOPSAU). Most of its airbases are located on the island of Java. The Indonesian Air Force also has its ground force unit, called Air Force Special Forces Corps (Paskhas). In addition, While not part of the Air Force, most of Indonesian National Air Defense Forces Command (Kohanudnas) personnel are picked from the Air Force and its commander is always an Air Force two-star Marshal.

The Indonesian Air Force has 37,850 personnel and equipped with 110 combat aircraft. The inventory includes Su-27 and Su-30 as the main fighters (from Russia) supplemented by F-16 Fighting Falcons (from the US). The Indonesian Air Force will purchase 11 Sukhoi Su-35 and around 50 KF-X as a replacement for the already-aging US Northrop F-5 Tiger light fighters in its inventory.

Indonesian Army

The Indonesian Army (Indonesian: Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Darat (TNI-AD), literally "Indonesian National Military-Land Force") is the land branch of the Indonesian National Armed Forces. It has an estimated strength of 300,000 active personnel. The history of the Indonesian Army has its roots in 1945 when the Tentara Keamanan Rakyat (TKR) "Civil Security Forces" first emerged as a paramilitary and police corps.Since the nation's independence movement, the Indonesian Army has been involved in multifaceted operations ranging from the incorporation of Western New Guinea, the Indonesia-Malaysia Confrontation, to the annexation of East Timor, as well as internal counter-insurgency operations in Aceh, Maluku, and Papua. The army's operations have not been without controversy; it has been periodically associated with human rights violations, particularly in West Papua, East Timor and Aceh.The Indonesia Army is composed of a headquarters, 15 military region commands, a strategic reserve command KOSTRAD, a special forces command Kopassus, and various adjunct units.

Indonesian Marine Corps

The Indonesian Marine Corps (Indonesian: Korps Marinir) previously known as KKO (Korps Komando Operasi), officially known as KORMAR or simply "Marinir", Tentara Nasional Indonesia – Angkatan Laut, ("KORMAR", TNI-AL); officially translated as: Marine Corps, Indonesian Navy is currently an integral part of the Indonesian Navy and is sized at the military corps level unit as the naval infantry and main amphibious warfare force of Indonesia. The Marine Corps is commanded by a two-star marine general. As of August 2018, it has three divisions, each led by a one-star marine general:

Pasukan Marinir I / PASMAR I (Marine Force I) based in Sidoarjo.

Pasukan Marinir II / PASMAR II (Marine Force II) based in Jakarta.

Pasukan Marinir III / PASMAR III (Marine Force III) based in Sorong.The Marine Corps was initially formed as a special operations force for the Indonesian Navy (TNI-AL), then named Korps Komando Operasi abbreviated "KKO" (lit: "Operational Commandos Corps"). The Marine Corps was actively involved in various confrontations and conflicts in Indonesia.

The Marine Corps also maintains a joint Navy-Marine special operations unit, known as Detasemen Jala Mangkara or "DENJAKA" (Jala Mangkara Detachment) created on 1 December 1984, and draws operators from the KOPASKA (Navy's Frogman Commando Force) and Taifib (Marine's Amphibious Reconnaissance Battalion).

Indonesian National Armed Forces

The Indonesian National Armed Forces (Indonesian: Tentara Nasional Indonesia, literally "Indonesian National Military"; abbreviated as TNI) are the military forces of the Republic of Indonesia. It consists of the Army (TNI-AD), Navy (TNI-AL), and Air Force (TNI-AU). The President of Indonesia is the commander-in-chief of the Armed Forces. In 2016, it comprises approximately 395,500 military personnel including the Indonesian Marine Corps (Korps Marinir), which is the branch of the Navy.

The Indonesian Armed Forces was formed during the Indonesian National Revolution, when it undertook a guerrilla war along with informal militia. As a result of this, and the need to maintain internal security, the Armed forces including the Army, Navy, and Air Force has been organised along territorial lines, aimed at defeating internal enemies of the state and potential external invaders.Under the 1945 Constitution, all citizens are legally entitled and obliged to defend the nation. Conscription is provided for by law, yet the Forces have been able to maintain mandated strength levels without resorting to a draft. Most enlisted personnel are recruited in their own home regions and generally train and serve most of their time in units nearby.

The Indonesian armed forces are voluntary. The active military strength is 395,500 with available manpower fit for military service of males aged between 16 and 49 is 75,000,000, with a further 4,500,000 new suitable for service annually.Military spending in the national budget was widely estimated 3% of GDP in 2005, but is supplemented by revenue from many military-run businesses and foundations. The defence budget for 2017 was $8.17bn. The Indonesian armed forces (Military) personnel does not include members of law enforcement and paramilitary personnel such as the Indonesian National Police (Polri) consisting of approximately 590,000+ personnel, Mobile Brigade Corps (Brimob) of around 42,000+ armed personnel, the Civil Service Police Unit (Municipal police) or Satpol PP, Indonesian College Students' Regiment or Resimen Mahasiswa (Menwa) which is a collegiate military service consisting 26,000 trained personnel, and civil defence personnel (Linmas or Public Protection Service Corps, which replaced the old Hansip in 2014).

Indonesian Navy

The Indonesian Navy (Indonesian: Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Laut (TNI-AL), literally "Indonesian National Military-Naval Force") is the naval branch of the Indonesian National Armed Forces. It was founded on 10 September 1945 and has a role to patrol Indonesia's lengthy coastline, to enforce and patrol the territorial waters and Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Indonesia, to protect Indonesia's maritime strategic interests, to protect the islands surrounding Indonesia, and to defend against seaborne threats.

The Indonesian Navy is headed by a Chief of Staff of the Navy (Kepala Staf Angkatan Laut – Kasal). The Indonesian Navy is strengthen by three major fleets known as "Armada" which are Komando Armada I (1st Fleet Command) located in Jakarta, Komando Armada II (2nd Fleet Command) located in Surabaya, Komando Armada III (3rd Fleet Command) located in Sorong, and one Military Sealift Command (Komando Lintas Laut Militer). The Navy also heads the Marine Corps.

All commissioned ships of the TNI-AL have the prefix KRI, standing for Kapal Republik Indonesia (Republic of Indonesia Ship).

List of Indonesia-related topics

This is a list of topics related to Indonesia.

List of comparative military ranks

This article is a list of various states' armed forces ranking designations. Comparisons are made between the different systems used by nations to categorize the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. Several of these lists mention NATO reference codes. These are the NATO rank reference codes, used for easy comparison among NATO countries. Links to comparison charts can be found below.

Master corporal

Master corporal (MCpl) (French: caporal-chef or cplc), in the Canadian Armed Forces and the Royal Canadian Army Cadets is an appointment of the rank of Corporal in the Canadian Army and Royal Canadian Air Force. Its Naval equivalent is master seaman (MS) (French: matelot-chef or matc). It is also known as the most senior corporal rank in the Indonesian Military ranks, which is known as Kopral Kepala.

According to the Queen's Regulations and Orders:

(1) The Chief of the Defence Staff or such officer as he may designate may appoint a corporal as a master corporal. (2) The rank of a master corporal remains that of corporal.

(3) Master corporals have seniority among themselves in their order of seniority as corporals.

(4) Master corporals have authority and powers of command over all other corporals." — QR&O 3.08

Master corporal, while formally an appointment, is treated as a de facto non-commissioned member rank, and is often described as such, even in official documents.

As mentioned above, the master corporal is senior to the corporal (and its Naval counterpart, leading seaman). It is junior to the rank of sergeant (Sgt) and its equivalent naval rank, petty officer 2nd class (PO2). Master corporals and master seamen together with corporals and leading seamen make up the cadre of junior non-commissioned officers.

The rank insignia of a master corporal is a 2-bar chevron, worn point down, surmounted by a maple leaf. Embroidered rank badges are worn in "CF gold" thread on rifle green (Army) melton, or in silver on Air Force blue (Air Force) melton, stitched to the upper sleeves of the Service Dress jacket; as miniature gold metal and rifle-green enamel badges on the collars of the Army dress shirt and Army outerwear jackets; in "old-gold" thread on Air Force blue slip-ons on Air Force shirts, sweaters, and coats; and in tan (Army) or dark blue (Air Force) thread on CADPAT slip-ons on the Operational Dress uniform. Insignia for mess kit is determined by branch or regimental tradition.

Master corporals normally mess and billet with the Junior Ranks. Within most Canadian Army units, master corporals are commonly nicknamed "master jack" or "jack" by both superiors and subordinates. The nickname is derived from the former equivalent rank of Lance Corporal, or "Lance Jack". This is an informality and is only used within social context and never in formal proceedings. Only in closer working or socially comfortable units like rifle regiments or infantry units in general is this informal term commonly used. Master corporals are also frequently referred to as "chef" in Quebec, a reference to the French translation of the rank, caporal-chef.

Mulyono

General (Ret.) Mulyono (born 12 January 1961) is an Indonesian general who previously served as the Chief of Staff of the Indonesian Army (Indonesian: Kepala Staf Angkatan Darat, abbreviated Kasad or KSAD). He was appointed by President of Indonesia Joko Widodo in 2015, replacing Gatot Nurmantyo who became commander (Panglima) of the Indonesian National Armed Forces.

Mulyono had graduated from the Indonesian Military Academy in 1983. Before becoming chief of staff, he had served as Chief of the Indonesian Strategic Reserve Command (Kostrad).

Police commissioner

Police commissioner (also known as the commissioner of police) is a senior rank in many police forces.

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