IndieWire

IndieWire (sometimes stylized as indieWIRE or Indiewire) is a film industry and review website that was established in 1996. As of January 19, 2016, IndieWire is a subsidiary of Penske Media.[2] It has a staff of about 20, including publisher James Israel, and Editor-in-Chief Dana Harris.

IndieWire
IndieWire logo 2016
Type of site
Independent filmmaking news, progressive
Available inEnglish
OwnerPenske Media Corporation
Websiteindiewire.com
Alexa rankPositive decrease 3,168 (January 2018)[1]
RegistrationOptional
LaunchedNewsletter: 15 July 1996
Website: January 12, 1998
Current statusOnline
Content license
All rights reserved. Use permitted with copyright notice intact.

History

IndieWire logo
Former Indiewire logo

The original IndieWire newsletter launched on July 15, 1996, billing itself as "the daily news service for independent film." Following in the footsteps of various web- and AOL-based editorial ventures, IndieWire was launched as a free daily email publication in the summer of 1996 by New York and Los Angeles based filmmakers and writers Eugene Hernandez, Mark Rabinowitz, Cheri Barner, Roberto A. Quezada and Mark L. Feinsod.[3]

Initially distributed to a few hundred subscribers, the readership grew rapidly, passing 6,000 in the fall of 1997.[4]

In January 1997, IndieWire made its first appearance at the Sundance Film Festival to begin their coverage of film festivals; it offered indieWIRE: On The Scene print dailies in addition to online coverage. Printed on site, in low tech black and white style, the publication was able to scoop traditional Hollywood trade dailies Variety and The Hollywood Reporter due to the delay these latter publications had for being printed in Los Angeles.

The site was acquired by Snagfilms in July 2008. On January 8, 2009, IndieWire editor Eugene Hernandez announced that the site was going through a re-launch that has been "entirely re-imagined." In 2011, with the launch of a redesign, the site changed the formal spelling of its name from indieWIRE to IndieWire.

In 2012, IndieWire won the Webby Award in the Movie and Film category.[5]

Reception

IndieWire is said to cover lesser-known film events ignored from the mainstream perspective. In Wired, in 1997, Janelle Brown wrote: "Currently, IndieWire has little to no competition: trades like The Hollywood Reporter and Variety may cover independent film, but from a Hollywood perspective, hidden by a huge amount of mainstream news. As filmmaker Doug Wolens points out, IndieWire is one of the few places where filmmakers can consistently and reliably keep on top of often-ignored small film festivals, which films are opening and what other filmmakers are thinking."[4]

In 2002, Forbes magazine recognized IndieWire, along with 7 other entrants in the "Cinema Appreciation" category, as a "Best of the Web Pick,"[6] describing its best feature as "boards teeming with filmmakers" and its worst as "glacial search engine."[7]

IndieWire has been praised by Roger Ebert.[8]

Critics' Poll

The IndieWire Critic's Poll is an annual poll by IndieWire that recognizes the best in American and international films in a ranking of 10 films on 15 different categories. The winners are chosen by the votes of the critics from IndieWire.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Indiewire.com Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved 2014-04-01.
  2. ^ "Penske Media Acquires Indiewire". Variety. January 19, 2016.
  3. ^ "Indiewire at 10 and Counting". July 15, 2006. (Press release)
  4. ^ a b Brown, Janelle (December 22, 1997). "Indie Film News Service No Longer Free". Wired. Retrieved 2011-05-22.
  5. ^ "Webby Awards 2012".
  6. ^ "Forbes Best of the Web - Cinema Appreciation". Forbes. March 25, 2002. Retrieved 2010-05-21.
  7. ^ "Forbes Best of the Web - IndieWire". Forbes. March 25, 2002. Retrieved 2010-05-21.
  8. ^ Ebert, Roger (June 1999). "Rule of Thumb: Best Indie Crossroads". Yahoo Internet Life - Summer Movies Guide. ZDNet. 5 (6). Archived from the original on 1999-11-13. Retrieved 2011-05-22.

External links

Ain't It Cool News

Ain't It Cool News (AICN) is a website founded by Harry Knowles and run by his sister Dannie Knowles since September 2017, dedicated to news, rumors, and reviews of upcoming and current films, television, and comic book projects, with an emphasis on science fiction, superhero, fantasy, horror, and action genres.

Amy Seimetz

Amy Lynne Seimetz (born November 25, 1981) is an American actress, writer, producer, director, and editor. She has appeared in several productions, including AMC's The Killing, HBO's Family Tree and Shane Carruth's Upstream Color. In 2015, she co-wrote, co-directed and executive produced the Starz series The Girlfriend Experience, based on the Steven Soderbergh film of the same name, which was released to positive reviews and critical acclaim.

Anne Thompson (film journalist)

Anne Thompson is a journalist covering film and television. She is Editor At Large at IndieWire and founder of the Thompson on Hollywood blog.

BoJack Horseman

BoJack Horseman is an American adult animated comedy-drama series created by Raphael Bob-Waksberg. The series stars Will Arnett as the title character, with a supporting cast including Amy Sedaris, Alison Brie, Paul F. Tompkins, and Aaron Paul. The series' first season premiered on August 22, 2014, on Netflix, with a Christmas special premiering on December 19. The show is designed by the cartoonist Lisa Hanawalt, who has been friends with Bob-Waksberg since high school and had previously worked with him on the webcomic Tip Me Over, Pour Me Out.Despite mixed reviews upon its debut, critics were notably more positive towards the second half of the first season, before universally acclaiming the subsequent seasons. Alongside satirizing the entertainment industry and having topical humor, BoJack is lauded for its realistic take on dealing with depression, trauma, addiction, self-destructive behavior, racism, sexism, and the human experience.The fifth season premiered on September 14, 2018; the show has been renewed for a sixth season.

Brie Larson

Brianne Sidonie Desaulniers (born October 1, 1989), known professionally as Brie Larson, is an American actress and filmmaker. Noted for her supporting work in comedies when a teenager, she has since expanded to leading roles in independent dramas and film franchises, receiving such accolades as an Academy Award and a Golden Globe. Time magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2019.

Born in Sacramento, California, Larson was homeschooled. At age six, she became the youngest student admitted to a training program at the American Conservatory Theater. She soon relocated to Los Angeles and began her acting career in 1998 with a comedy sketch in The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. She appeared as a regular in the 2001 sitcom Raising Dad and briefly dabbled with a music career, releasing the album Finally Out of P.E. in 2005. Larson subsequently played supporting roles in the comedy films Hoot (2006), Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010), and 21 Jump Street (2012), and appeared as a sardonic teenager in the television series United States of Tara (2009–2011).

Larson's breakthrough came with a leading role in the acclaimed independent drama Short Term 12 (2013), and she continued to take on supporting parts in the romance The Spectacular Now (2013) and the comedy Trainwreck (2015). For playing a kidnapping victim in the drama Room (2015), Larson won the Academy Award for Best Actress. The 2017 adventure film Kong: Skull Island marked her first big-budget release, after which she starred as Carol Danvers in the 2019 Marvel Cinematic Universe superhero films Captain Marvel and Avengers: Endgame.

Larson has also co-written and co-directed two short films, including The Arm (2012), which received a special jury prize at the Sundance Film Festival. She made her feature film directorial debut in 2017 with the independent comedy-drama Unicorn Store. A gender equality activist and an advocate for sexual assault survivors, Larson is vocal about social and political issues.

Call Me by Your Name (film)

Call Me by Your Name (Italian: Chiamami col tuo nome) is a 2017 coming-of-age romantic drama film directed by Luca Guadagnino. Its screenplay, by James Ivory, who also co-produced, was based on André Aciman's 2007 novel of the same name. The film is the final installment in Guadagnino's thematic "Desire" trilogy, after I Am Love (2009) and A Bigger Splash (2015). Set in northern Italy in 1983, Call Me by Your Name chronicles a romantic relationship between a 17-year-old, Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet), and Oliver (Armie Hammer), a 24-year-old graduate-student assistant to Elio's father (Michael Stuhlbarg), a professor of archaeology. The film also stars the French actresses Amira Casar, Esther Garrel, and Victoire Du Bois.

Development began in 2007 when producers Peter Spears and Howard Rosenman "optioned" the rights to Aciman's novel. Ivory had been chosen to co-direct with Guadagnino, but stepped down in 2016. Guadagnino had joined the project as a location scout, and eventually became sole director, and co-producer. The film was financed by several international companies, and its principal photography took place mainly in the city and comune of Crema, Lombardy, in May and June 2016. Cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom used 35 mm film, as opposed to employing digital cinematography. The filmmakers spent weeks decorating Villa Albergoni, one of the main shooting locations. Guadagnino curated the film's soundtrack, which features three original songs by the American singer-songwriter Sufjan Stevens.

Sony Pictures Classics acquired distribution rights to Call Me by Your Name before its world premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival on January 22, 2017. It began a limited release in the United States on November 24, 2017, and went on general release on January 19, 2018. The film garnered a number of accolades, including many for its screenplay, direction, acting, and music. It received four nominations at the 90th Academy Awards (including Best Picture), and won Best Adapted Screenplay. Ivory's screenplay also won at the 23rd Critics' Choice Awards, 71st British Academy Film Awards, and the Writers Guild of America Awards 2017. A sequel to the film was announced in January 2018.

Fandor (film site)

Fandor is an American subscription film viewing service and social video sharing platform.

Headquartered in San Francisco, California, the company was established in 2010 and officially launched on March 9, 2011 at the South by Southwest festival and conference in Austin, Texas.Fandor "specializes in independent films, classics, silent films, foreign films, documentaries and shorts". Most of Fandor's more than 6,000 films are outside mainstream channels and hail from a variety of cultures, time periods, and genres. The service streams content to home theaters, through devices like Roku, computers, mobile devices, and tablets, like Apple Inc.'s iPad. It is also available through Sling TV as an add-on.

In September 2013, at the Toronto International Film Festival, Fandor announced that the site was launching to audiences in Canada. In 2018, the company laid off its entire staff and sold its assets to an undisclosed investment company.

IndieWire Critics Poll

The IndieWire Critics Poll is an annual poll by IndieWire that recognizes the best in American and international films in a ranking of 10 films on 15 different categories. The winners are chosen by the votes of the critics from Indiewire. The poll began in 2006.

Jessica Chastain

Jessica Michelle Chastain (born March 24, 1977) is an American actress and producer. She is known for her portrayals of strong-willed women in films with feminist themes. Chastain's accolades include a Golden Globe Award and two Academy Award nominations. Time magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2012.

Born and raised in Sacramento, California, Chastain developed an interest in acting from a young age. In 1998, she made her professional stage debut as Shakespeare's Juliet. After studying acting at the Juilliard School, she was signed to a talent holding deal with the television producer John Wells. She was a recurring guest star in several television shows, including Law & Order: Trial by Jury. She also took on roles in the stage productions of Anton Chekhov's play The Cherry Orchard in 2004 and Oscar Wilde's tragedy Salome in 2006.

Chastain made her film debut in the drama Jolene (2008), and gained wide recognition in 2011 for starring roles in half a dozen films, including the dramas Take Shelter and The Tree of Life. Her performance as an aspiring socialite in The Help earned her a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. In 2012, she won a Golden Globe Award and received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actress for playing a CIA analyst in the thriller Zero Dark Thirty. Chastain made her Broadway debut in a revival of The Heiress in the same year. Her highest-grossing releases came with the science fiction films Interstellar (2014) and The Martian (2015), and she continued to receive critical acclaim for her performances in the dramas A Most Violent Year (2014), Miss Sloane (2016), and Molly's Game (2017).

Chastain is the founder of the production company Freckle Films, which was created to promote diversity in film. She is vocal about mental health issues, as well as gender and racial equality. She is married to fashion executive Gian Luca Passi de Preposulo, with whom she has a daughter.

Mumblecore

Mumblecore is a subgenre of independent film characterized by naturalistic acting and dialogue (sometimes improvised), low-budget film production, an emphasis on dialogue over plot, and a focus on the personal relationships of people in their 20s and 30s. Filmmakers associated with the genre include Andrew Bujalski, Lynn Shelton, Mark Duplass, Jay Duplass, Greta Gerwig, Aaron Katz, Joe Swanberg, and Ry Russo-Young; in many cases, though, these directors reject the term.The genre is a mostly American phenomenon, but Indian and German mumblecore films have also been produced.

The term mumblegore has been used for films mixing the mumblecore and horror genres.

New Hollywood

New Hollywood, sometimes referred to as the "American New Wave", or "The Hollywood Renaissance", refers to a movement in American film history from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, when a new generation of young filmmakers came to prominence in the United States.

They influenced the types of films produced, their production and marketing, and the way major studios approached film-making. In New Hollywood films, the film director, rather than the studio, took on a key authorial role. The definition of New Hollywood varies, depending on the author, with some of them defining it as a movement and others as a period. The span of the period is also a subject of debate, as well as its integrity, as some authors, such as Thomas Schatz, argue that the New Hollywood consists of several different movements. The films made in this movement are stylistically characterized in that their narrative often strongly deviated from classical norms. After the demise of the studio system and the rise of television, the commercial success of films was diminished. The "New Hollywood" period was a period of revival.

Successful films of the early New Hollywood era include Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate, Night of the Living Dead, The Wild Bunch, and Easy Rider, while films that failed at the box office including Heaven's Gate and One from the Heart marked the end of the era (despite the two maintaining a cult following years later).

Nicolas Winding Refn

Nicolas Winding Refn (; Danish: [nekolæs venteŋ ˈʁɛfn̩]; born 29 September 1970) is a Danish film director, screenwriter and producer. He is known for directing the crime dramas Bleeder (1999) and the Pusher films (1996–2005), the fictionalised biographical film Bronson (2008), the dramatic adventure film Valhalla Rising (2009), the neo-noir crime film Drive (2011), the thriller Only God Forgives (2013), and the psychological horror film The Neon Demon (2016). In 2008, Refn co-founded the Copenhagen-based production company Space Rocket Nation.

Paterson (film)

Paterson is a 2016 drama film written and directed by Jim Jarmusch. The film stars Adam Driver as a bus driver and poet named Paterson, and Golshifteh Farahani as his wife, who dreams of being a country music star and opening a cupcake business.

Paterson was selected to compete for the Palme d'Or at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival, where it won the Palm Dog Award. It was released in Germany on November 17, 2016, by K5 International; in France on December 21, 2016, by Le Pacte; and in the United States on December 28, 2016, by Amazon Studios and Bleecker Street.

Paul Thomas Anderson

Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970), also referred to as P. T. Anderson or PTA, is an American filmmaker. His films have been nominated for 25 Academy Awards, winning three for cast and crew.

An alumnus of the Sundance Institute, Anderson directed his first feature film, Hard Eight, in 1996. He achieved critical and commercial success with Boogie Nights (1997), set during the Golden Age of Porn. His 2007 film There Will Be Blood, about an oil prospector during the Southern California oil boom, is often cited as one of the best films of the 2000s.Anderson's other notable films include Magnolia (1999), Punch-Drunk Love (2002), The Master (2012), Inherent Vice (2014), and Phantom Thread (2017).

Penske Media Corporation

Penske Media Corporation (PMC) is an American digital media, publishing, and information services company based in Los Angeles and New York City. It publishes more than 20 digital and print brands, including Variety, Rolling Stone, WWD, Deadline Hollywood, BGR, and others. PMC's Chairman and CEO since founding is Jay Penske.

RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com is an American film review website that archives reviews written by film critic Roger Ebert for the Chicago Sun-Times and also shares other critics' reviews and essays. Ebert handpicked writers from around the world to contribute to the website. After Ebert died in 2013, the website was relaunched under Ebert Digital, a partnership founded between Ebert, his wife Chaz, and friend Josh Golden.Two months after Ebert's death, Chaz Ebert hired film and television critic Matt Zoller Seitz as editor-in-chief for the website because his IndieWire blog PressPlay shared multiple contributors with RogerEbert.com, and because both websites promoted each other's content.The Dissolve's Noel Murray described the website's collection of Ebert reviews as "an invaluable resource, both for getting some front-line perspective on older movies, and for getting a better sense of who Ebert was." Murray said the website included reviews Ebert rarely discussed in conversation, such as those for Chelsea Girls (1966) and Good Times (1967), written when Ebert was in his twenties. R. Kurt Osenlund of Slant said in 2013 that other contributors (including Seitz, Sheila O'Malley, and Odie Henderson) had "a lot of first-person narrative" in their work like Ebert did, adding, "but there are other contributors, like Ignatiy Vishnevetsky, who don’t do so much of that. The overall diversity makes the site a kind of artists' collective."RogerEbert.com has routinely hosted a "Women Writer's Week" in honor of Women's History Month, featuring content from female contributors for the entire week. Following the United States presidential election of 2016, the "Women Writer's Week" in 2017 was described by Observer to be "overtly political thanks to President Donald Trump". Chaz Ebert said the 2017 Women's March helped motivate female contributors to contribute their perspective to film and politics.

Roma (2018 film)

Roma is a 2018 drama film written and directed by Alfonso Cuarón, who also produced, shot, and co-edited it. Set in 1970 and 1971, Roma, which is a semi-autobiographical take on Cuarón's upbringing in the Colonia Roma neighborhood of Mexico City, stars Yalitza Aparicio and Marina de Tavira and follows the life of a live-in housekeeper of a middle-class family.The film had its world premiere at the 75th Venice International Film Festival on 30 August 2018, where it won the Golden Lion. It began a limited theatrical run in the United States on 21 November 2018, before streaming on Netflix in the US and other territories starting on 14 December 2018. The film received universal acclaim, with particular praise given to Cuarón's screenplay, direction and cinematography, as well as Aparicio's and de Tavira's performances.

Roma received a number of accolades, with ten nominations at the 91st Academy Awards, among them Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, Best Actress (Aparicio) and Best Supporting Actress (de Tavira). It became the first Mexican entry to win Best Foreign Language Film, and also won for Best Cinematography and Best Director, becoming the first foreign language film to win in the last category, as well as marking the first time a director won Best Cinematography for his or her own film. It was tied with The Favourite as the most-nominated film of the show, and with Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) for the most Academy Award nominations ever received by a non-English language film. It also won Best Director and Best Foreign Language Film at the 76th Golden Globe Awards, Best Picture and Best Director at the 24th Critics' Choice Awards, and Best Film, Best Film Not in the English Language, Best Direction and Best Cinematography at the 72nd British Academy Film Awards.

Steven Soderbergh

Steven Andrew Soderbergh (; born January 14, 1963) is an American filmmaker, screenwriter, producer, and actor. He is considered one of the founding pioneers of the independent cinema movement and among the most acclaimed and prolific filmmakers of his generation.

Soderbergh's directorial breakthrough—indie drama Sex, Lies, and Videotape (1989)—lifted him into the public spotlight as a notable presence in the film industry. At 26, Soderbergh became the youngest solo director to win the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival which garnered the film worldwide commercial success, among numerous accolades. His breakthrough saw him to Hollywood where he directed crime comedy Out of Sight (1998); biopic Erin Brockovich (2000) and crime drama film Traffic (2000), the latter winning him the Academy Award for Best Director. He found further popular and critical success with the Ocean's trilogy and film franchise (2001–18); Contagion (2011); Magic Mike (2012); Side Effects (2013); Logan Lucky (2017); and Unsane (2018). Despite his film career spanning a multitude of genres, his cinematic niche centers on psychological, crime, and heist thrillers. His films have grossed over US$2.2 billion worldwide and garnered nine Oscar nominations, winning seven.

Soderbergh's films often center on the metaphysical themes of distorted reality, shifting personal identities, vengeance, sexuality, morality, and the human condition. His feature films retain distinctive cinematography as a result of his liberal use of avant-garde cinema coupled with unconventional film and camera formats. Many of Soderbergh's films are anchored by multi-dimensional storylines with plot twists, nonlinear storytelling, experimental sequencing, suspenseful soundscapes, and third person vantage points. Uniquely, he often serves as his own director of photography and editor under the respective pseudonyms Peter Andrews and Mary Ann Bernard.

The Master (2012 film)

The Master is a 2012 American drama film written, directed, and co-produced by Paul Thomas Anderson and starring Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and Amy Adams. It tells the story of Freddie Quell (Phoenix), a World War II veteran struggling to adjust to a post-war society, who meets Lancaster Dodd (Hoffman), a leader of a religious movement known as "The Cause". Dodd sees something in Quell, and accepts him into the movement. Freddie takes a liking to "The Cause", and begins traveling with Dodd along the East Coast to spread the teachings.

It was produced by Annapurna Pictures and Ghoulardi Film Company and distributed by The Weinstein Company. With a budget of $30 million, filming began in June 2011, with cinematography provided by Mihai Mălaimare Jr. Jonny Greenwood was the music composer and Peter McNulty film editor. The film's inspirations were varied: it was partly inspired by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, as well as early drafts of Anderson's There Will Be Blood, the novel V. by Thomas Pynchon, drunk Navy stories that Jason Robards had told to Anderson as he was terminally ill while filming Magnolia, and the life story of author John Steinbeck. The Master was shot almost entirely on 65mm film stock, making it the first fiction feature to be shot and released in 70 mm since Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet in 1996.

Initially, the film was set up with Universal, but fell through due to script and budget problems. It was first publicly shown on August 3, 2012, at the American Cinematheque in 70 mm and screened variously in the same way, and officially premiered at the Venice Film Festival on September 1, where it won the FIPRESCI Award for Best Film. It was released on September 14, 2012, in the United States to critical acclaim, with its acting, screenplay, direction, plausibility and realistic resemblance to post-World War II Americans praised. It further received three Academy Award nominations: Best Actor for Phoenix, Best Supporting Actor for Hoffman, and Best Supporting Actress for Adams. In 2016, The Master was voted the 24th greatest film of the 21st century by 177 critics from around the world. Anderson has repeatedly claimed that The Master is his favorite film that he has made to date.

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