Indiana University

Indiana University (IU) is a multi-campus public university system in the state of Indiana, United States.[2] Indiana University has a combined student body of more than 110,000 students, which includes approximately 46,000 students enrolled at the Indiana University Bloomington campus.[1]

Indiana University
Indiana University seal
Latin: Indianensis Universitas
MottoLux et Veritas
(Light and Truth)
TypePublic University system
EstablishedJanuary 20, 1820
Endowment$1.986 billion
PresidentMichael McRobbie
Academic staff
8,733 university-wide[1]
Students110,436 university-wide[1]
Undergraduates89,176 university-wide[1]
Postgraduates21,260 university-wide[1]
Location
39°10′N 86°30′W / 39.167°N 86.500°WCoordinates: 39°10′N 86°30′W / 39.167°N 86.500°W
Campus3,640 acres (14.7 km2) across 9 campuses[1]
ColorsCream and Crimson          
Affiliations
MascotReferred to as "The Hoosiers".
Websitewww.iu.edu
Indiana University logotype

Campuses

Indiana University has a total of nine different campuses. Each one of the campuses is an accredited, four-year degree-granting institution.

The flagship campus of Indiana University is located in Bloomington.[3]

In addition to its flagship campus, Indiana University comprises seven lesser extensions throughout Indiana:[6]

Endowment

According to the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO), the value of the endowment of the Indiana University and affiliated foundations in 2016 is over $1.986 billion.[9] The annual budget across all campuses totals over $3 Billion.[10]

The Indiana University Research and Technology Corporation (IURTC) is a not-for-profit agency that assists IU faculty and researchers in realizing the commercial potential of their discoveries. Since 1997, university clients have been responsible for more than 1,800 inventions, nearly 500 patents, and 38 start-up companies.[11]

In the 2016 Fiscal Year alone, the IURTC was issued 53 U.S. patents and 112 global patents.[12]

Notable alumni

Suzanne Collins David Shankbone 2010 (cropped)
Suzanne Collins (1985), Author of the Hunger Games series
Mike Pence official Vice Presidential portrait
Mike Pence, 48th Vice President of the United States.

Awards

Indiana University has three medals to recognize individuals.[14]

  • The University Medal, the only IU medal that requires approval from the Board of Trustees, was created in 1982 by then IU President John W. Ryan and is the highest award bestowed by the University. It honors individuals for singular or noteworthy contributions, including service to the university and achievement in arts, letters, science and law. The first recipient was Thomas T. Solley, former director of the IU Art Museum.[14][15]
  • Indiana University President's Medal for Excellence honors individuals for distinction in public service, service to Indiana University, achievement in a profession, and/or extraordinary merit and achievement in the arts, humanities, science, education, and industry.[14] The first recipients were member of the Beaux Arts Trio on September 20, 1985.
  • Thomas Hart Benton Mural Medallion "recognizes individuals who are shining examples of the values of IU and the universal academic community." President Ryan was the first to award this honor. It was first awarded to the president of Nanjing University on July 21, 1986. It honors individuals for distinction in public office or service, a significant relationship to Indiana University or Indiana, significant service to IU programs, students, or faculty, significant contribution to research or support for research.[14]

Indiana University has a number of ways to recognize the accomplishments of faculty.[16]

  • Distinguished Professorships – Indiana University's most prestigious academic appointment
  • University Distinguished Teaching Awards – recognizing "shining examples of dedication and excellence"
  • Thomas Ehrlich Award for Excellence in Service Learning – recognizing excellence in service learning. The recipient is also the IU nominee for the national Campus Compact Thomas Ehrlich Award for Service Learning.

Symbols

The Mace, a symbol of authority dating back to medieval times, when it was a studded, club-like weapon that was made of iron and could break armor. It later would be used in processions of city mayors and other dignitaries, and became an emblem of order and authority during academic ceremonies. The staff of IU's Mace is 30 inches long and made of polished ebony encircled with four brass, gold-plated collars and entwined by swirled gold bands. Atop the staff is a globe of plated brass with four flat sides. The sides of the globe are embossed with IU's seal, the seal of the state of Indiana, the emblematic initials "IU," and the donor inscription. The Mace was presented to the university by Indiana Alpha of Phi Delta Theta in 1949. Mounted on the globe of the Mace are 12 large synthetic jewels of blue sapphire, ruby, garnet and topaz. Atop this rests an eagle with outstretched wings.

The Jewel and Chain of Office is worn by the university president at ceremonial occasions. The Jewel of Office is handcrafted of gold-plated sterling silver and precious jewels. Each part of the design has a symbolic meaning that reflects IU's historic origin and educational mission, noting such things as the number of states in the Union when the university was founded in 1820 (22 states), the year Indiana became a state (1816), and the years that mark IU's evolution from a seminary to a university (1820, 1828 and 1838). The jewels in the item include emeralds, sapphires, topaz, rubies and diamonds. The Jewel of Office was presented to the university in 1946 by the Pi chapter of Beta Theta Pi. The Chain of Office was donated to the university in 1958 by the Lambda chapter of Sigma Chi. The chain is handcrafted of gold-plated sterling silver and contains 44 linked panels, eight of which are engraved with the names of the presidents who have served the university since the Jewel of Office was first worn as the symbol of the presidency.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "2011–12 IU Factbook". Indiana University (Bloomington, Indiana). Retrieved 2012-06-16.
  2. ^ "CHE: Institutional Missions". Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 3 August 2015.
  3. ^ "Campuses: Indiana University". Retrieved 3 August 2015.
  4. ^ "About". Indiana University Bloomington. Retrieved 3 August 2015.
  5. ^ "Schools". Indiana University Bloomington. Retrieved 3 August 2015.
  6. ^ Regional Campus Agreement
  7. ^ "About IUPUI". Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis. Retrieved 3 August 2015.
  8. ^ "Schools". Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. Retrieved 3 August 2015.
  9. ^ "U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year 2016 Endowment Market Value and Change* in Endowment Market Value from FY2015 to FY2016" (PDF). NACUBO and Commonfund Institute. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-02-15. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  10. ^ "Fast Facts about IU".
  11. ^ "The Indiana University Research and Technology Corporation (IURTC)".
  12. ^ "IU Fast Facts (See: #5)".
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2018-05-01. Retrieved 2018-05-01.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ a b c d "Medals". Indiana University Office of University Ceremonies. Retrieved 2010-02-20.
  15. ^ "IU President McRobbie presents University Medal to Elinor and Vincent Ostrom". Retrieved 2010-02-20.
  16. ^ "Medals". Indiana University Office of University Ceremonies. Retrieved 2010-02-20.

Further reading

  • Capshew, James H. Herman B Wells: The Promise of the American University (Indiana University Press, 2012) 460 pp (excerpt and text search)
  • Clark, Thomas D. Indiana University, Midwest Pioneer, Volume I: The Early Years (1970)
  • Clark, Thomas D. Indiana University: Midwestern Pioneer, Vol II In Mid-Pasage (1973)
  • Clark, Thomas D. Indiana University: Midwestern Pioneer: Volume III/ Years of Fulfillment (1977) covers 1938–68 with emphasis on Wells.
  • Gray, Donald J., ed. The Department of English at Indiana University, Bloomington, 1868–1970 (1974)

Primary sources

External links

Bloomington, Indiana

Bloomington is a city in and the county seat of Monroe County in the southern region of the U.S. state of Indiana. It is the seventh-largest city in Indiana and the fourth-largest outside the Indianapolis metropolitan area. According to the Monroe County History Center, Bloomington is known as the "Gateway to Scenic Southern Indiana." The city was established in 1818 by a group of settlers from Kentucky, Tennessee, the Carolinas, and Virginia who were so impressed with "a haven of blooms" that they called it Bloomington.The population was 80,405 at the 2010 census. The city's population was estimated at 84,067 as of July 2016 by the U.S. Census Bureau.Bloomington is the home to Indiana University Bloomington. Established in 1820, IU Bloomington has 49,695 students, as of September 2016, and is the original and largest campus of Indiana University. Most of the campus buildings are built of Indiana limestone.

Bloomington is also the home of the Indiana University School of Education, Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University Maurer School of Law, the Jacobs School of Music, Indiana University Press, the Kelley School of Business, the Kinsey Institute, the Stone Age Institute, the Indiana University School of Optometry, and the Indiana University School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering.

Bloomington has been designated a Tree City for 32 years, as of 2015. The city was also the location of the Academy Award–winning 1979 movie Breaking Away, featuring a reenactment of Indiana University's annual Little 500 bicycle race. Monroe County's famous limestone quarries are also featured in the movie.

David Starr Jordan

David Starr Jordan (January 19, 1851 – September 19, 1931) was an American ichthyologist, educator, eugenicist, and peace activist. He was president of Indiana University and the founding president of Stanford University.

Indiana, Our Indiana

"Indiana, Our Indiana" is the official school fight song of Indiana University. The lyrics were written by IU band director, Russell P. Harker, to the tune of "The Viking March" by Karl King, conductor of the Barnum and Bailey Circus Band.

The song was first performed by the IU Band during a football game against Northwestern University in November 1912.

Indiana Hoosiers

The Indiana Hoosiers are the intercollegiate sports teams and players of Indiana University Bloomington, named after the colloquial term for people from the state of Indiana. The Hoosiers participate in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in 24 sports and became a member of the Big Ten Conference on December 1, 1899. The school's official colors are cream and crimson.The Indiana Hoosiers have won 24 NCAA national championships and one Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) national championship. In addition to 145 NCAA individual national championships. Titles won by teams include eight by the Hoosiers men's soccer team, a record-setting six straight in men's swimming and diving, five by the Hoosiers men's basketball team, three in men's cross country, one in men's track and field and one in wrestling.

The Hoosiers' athletic program is perhaps best known for its basketball program, with its five NCAA Championships tying for fourth in history. Indiana's 1976 squad remains the last undefeated NCAA men's basketball champion. A 2018 study listed Indiana as the second most valuable collegiate basketball program in the country. Additionally, Hoosiers' athletics is well known for its soccer program; by a number of indicators, it is one of the greatest college soccer programs in the history of the sport. Since the program began in 1973, Indiana owns more National Championships, more wins, has appeared in more College Cups (18) and has a higher winning percentage in both regular season and post-season play than any other school in Division I soccer.

Indiana has two main rivalries including in-state, with the Purdue Boilermakers (see Indiana–Purdue rivalry), and a border rivalry against the Kentucky Wildcats (see Indiana–Kentucky rivalry).

Indiana University Bloomington

Indiana University Bloomington (IU Bloomington, IU, or simply Indiana) is a public research university in Bloomington, Indiana. It is the flagship institution of the Indiana University system and, with over 40,000 students, its largest university.Indiana University is a "Public Ivy" university and consistently ranks in the top 100 national universities in the U.S. and among the top 50 public universities. It is a member of the Association of American Universities and has numerous schools and programs, including the Jacobs School of Music, the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs, the Kelley School of Business, the School of Public Health, the School of Nursing, the School of Optometry, the Maurer School of Law, the School of Education, the Media School, and the Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies.As of Fall 2017, 43,710 students attend Indiana University. While 55.1% of the student body was from Indiana, students from all 50 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 165 countries were also enrolled. As of 2018, the average ACT score is a 28 and an SAT score of 1276. The university is home to an extensive student life program, with more than 750 student organizations on campus and with around 17 percent of undergraduates joining the Greek system. Indiana athletic teams compete in Division I of the NCAA and are known as the Indiana Hoosiers. The university is a member of the Big Ten Conference; since it does not have a mascot, all teams are known simply as "Hoosiers".

Indiana's faculty, staff, and alumni include nine Nobel laureates, 17 Rhodes Scholars, 17 Marshall Scholars, and five MacArthur Fellows. In addition, students and alumni have won six Academy Awards, 49 Grammy Awards, 32 Emmy Awards, 20 Pulitzer Prizes, four Tony Awards, and 104 Olympic medals (55 gold, 17 silver, and 32 bronze).Notable Indiana alumni include James Watson, one of the co-discoverers of the structure of DNA; Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of Wikipedia; Robert Gates, the 22nd United States Secretary of Defense; CEO and co-founder of Siri and Viv Dag Kittlaus; award-winning author Suzanne Collins, who wrote The Hunger Games series; composer and songwriter Hoagy Carmichael; John Chambers, executive chairman and former CEO of Cisco Systems; and billionaire investor Mark Cuban.

Indiana University Maurer School of Law

The Indiana University Maurer School of Law is located on the campus of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. IU Maurer is one of the top 15 public law schools in the United States, and tied for 30th overall, according to rankings published by U.S. News and World Report.

The school is named after Michael S. "Mickey" Maurer, an Indianapolis businessman and 1967 alumnus who donated $35 million in 2008. From its founding in 1842 until Maurer's donation, the school was known as the Indiana University School of Law – Bloomington.The law school is one of two law schools operated by Indiana University, the other being the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law (IU McKinney) in Indianapolis. Although both law schools are part of Indiana University, each law school is wholly independent of the other.

According to the law school's ABA-required disclosures, 78.8% of the Class of 2015 had obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment 10 months after graduation.

Indiana University Northwest

Indiana University Northwest (IU Northwest) is a public university in Gary, Indiana. It is a regional campus of Indiana University and was established in 1963.

Indiana University Press

Indiana University Press, also known as IU Press, is an academic publisher founded in 1950 at Indiana University that specializes in the humanities and social sciences. Its headquarters are located in Bloomington, Indiana. IU Press publishes 140 new books annually, in addition to 29 academic journals, and maintains a current catalog comprising some 2,000 titles.Indiana University Press primarily publishes in the following areas: African, African American, Asian, cultural, Jewish, Holocaust, Middle Eastern studies, Russian and Eastern European, and women's and gender studies; anthropology, film studies, folklore, history, bioethics, music, paleontology, philanthropy, philosophy, and religion. IU Press undertakes extensive regional publishing under its Quarry Books imprint.

Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

The Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law (IU McKinney) is located on the campus of Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) in Indianapolis, Indiana, the urban campus of Indiana University. In the summer of 2001, the school moved to its new building, Lawrence W. Inlow Hall. IU McKinney is one of two law schools operated by Indiana University, the other being the Indiana University Maurer School of Law (IU Maurer) in Bloomington. Although both law schools are part of Indiana University, each law school is wholly independent of the other. According to IU McKinney's 2016 ABA-required disclosures, 82.5% of the Class of 2015 obtained full-time, long-term, J.D. required or J.D. advantage employment within nine months after graduation–the highest of any Indiana law school.Several of IU McKinney's programs have drawn national attention and honors. U.S. News & World Report ranks the school 11th in the nation for its health care law program, 23rd for legal writing, and 23rd for the part-time law program. Additionally, IU McKinney counts among its alumni many distinguished leaders in politics, public service, and the judiciary, including two United States Vice Presidents (Dan Quayle and Mike Pence) and numerous senators, representatives, governors, and ambassadors. In a listing of "The 50 Most Impressive Law School Buildings in the World," IU McKinney's building, Lawrence W. Inlow Hall, ranked 13th.

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) is a public research university in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. As of fall 2016, the university enrolled 10,618 undergraduates and 2,235 postgraduates, for a total enrollment of 12,853 students. The university is 55 miles (89 km) northeast of Pittsburgh. It is governed by a local Council of Trustees and the Board of Governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. IUP has branch campuses at Punxsutawney, Northpointe, and Monroeville. IUP is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne

Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) was a public university in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Founded in 1964, IPFW was a cooperatively-managed regional campus of two state university systems: Indiana University and Purdue University. IPFW hit its highest enrollment in 2014, with 13,459 undergraduate and postgraduate students in nine colleges and schools, including a branch of the Indiana University School of Medicine. During its last academic year (2017–2018), IPFW had a total enrollment of 10,414 students. IPFW offered more than 200 graduate and undergraduate degree programs through IU or Purdue universities. The university's 14 men's and women's athletic teams competed in Division I of the NCAA Summit League.

On July 1, 2018, the two universities parted company in Fort Wayne. The health sciences programs on the campus became Indiana University Fort Wayne, and the other programs became Purdue University Fort Wayne (PFW). About two weeks before the split took effect, the athletic program, which was inherited solely by PFW, changed its branding from Fort Wayne Mastodons to Purdue Fort Wayne Mastodons.

Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis

Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) is a public research university in Indianapolis, Indiana. A core campus of Indiana University that also offers Purdue University degrees, it is the result of a merger in 1969 of the Purdue Indianapolis Extension Center (1946) and Indiana University Indianapolis (1916). Located along the White River and Fall Creek, it sits upon a peninsula adjacent to Downtown Indianapolis.

Among more than 200 degree programs, the urban university hosts the primary campuses for both the Indiana University School of Medicine, with more than 2,000 students, and the Indiana University School of Dentistry; the only dental school in the state. Also represented among the graduate schools, the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law is one of only two law schools operated by Indiana University, with the Indiana University Maurer School of Law being the Bloomington equivalent. More than 8,000 students in 2014 were enrolled in professional schools. Total enrollment of 30,690 was reported in 2014, making it the third largest university in the state. Nearly 89% of the student body is composed of native Hoosiers, with 6% coming from abroad and the remaining from out of state.The IUPUI Jaguars compete in the NCAA's Division I in the Horizon League. Several athletics venues are located on the campus, including the IU Michael A. Carroll Track & Soccer Stadium and Indiana University Natatorium, the largest indoor pool in the United States, with a seating capacity of 4,700.

Indianapolis

Indianapolis (), often shortened to Indy, is the state capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Indiana and the seat of Marion County. According to 2017 estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, the consolidated population of Indianapolis and Marion County was 872,680. The "balance" population, which excludes semi-autonomous municipalities in Marion County, was 863,002. It is the 16th most populous city in the U.S. The Indianapolis metropolitan area is the 34th most populous metropolitan statistical area in the U.S., with 2,028,614 residents. Its combined statistical area ranks 27th, with a population of 2,411,086. Indianapolis covers 368 square miles (950 km2), making it the 16th largest city by land area in the U.S.

Indigenous peoples inhabited the area dating to approximately 2000 BC. In 1818, the Delaware relinquished their tribal lands in the Treaty of St. Mary's. In 1821, Indianapolis was founded as a planned city for the new seat of Indiana's state government. The city was platted by Alexander Ralston and Elias Pym Fordham on a 1 square mile (2.6 km2) grid next to the White River. Completion of the National and Michigan roads and arrival of rail later solidified the city's position as a manufacturing and transportation hub. Two of the city's nicknames reflect its historical ties to transportation—the "Crossroads of America" and "Railroad City". Since the 1970 city-county consolidation, known as Unigov, local government administration operates under the direction of an elected 25-member city-county council headed by the mayor.

Indianapolis anchors the 27th largest economic region in the U.S., based primarily on the sectors of finance and insurance, manufacturing, professional and business services, education and health care, government, and wholesale trade. The city has notable niche markets in amateur sports and auto racing. The Fortune 500 companies of Anthem, Eli Lilly and Company and Simon Property Group are headquartered in Indianapolis. The city has hosted international multi-sport events, such as the 1987 Pan American Games and 2001 World Police and Fire Games, but is perhaps best known for annually hosting the world's largest single-day sporting event, the Indianapolis 500.Indianapolis is home to two major league sports clubs, the Indiana Pacers of the National Basketball Association (NBA) and the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). It is home to a number of educational institutions, such as the University of Indianapolis, Butler University, Marian University, and Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). The city's robust philanthropic community has supported several cultural assets, including the world's largest children's museum, one of the nation's largest privately funded zoos, historic buildings and sites, and public art. The city is home to the largest collection of monuments dedicated to veterans and war casualties in the U.S., outside of Washington, D.C.

Jacobs School of Music

The Indiana University Jacobs School of Music in Bloomington, Indiana, is a music conservatory established in 1921. Until 2005, it was known as the Indiana University School of Music. It has more than 1,600 students, approximately half of whom are undergraduates, with the second largest enrollment of all music schools accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music.

Kelley School of Business

The Kelley School of Business (KSB) is an undergraduate and graduate business school at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana and Indianapolis, Indiana, United States. As of 2017, approximately 7,500 full-time undergraduate and graduate students are enrolled on its Bloomington campus, as well as 1,740 students at the Indianapolis campus. In addition, more than 800 students study for graduate degrees through the school's online MBA and MS programs through "Kelley Direct". Numerous publications have ranked the Kelley School of Business among the top programs in both the nation and world.

Memorial Stadium (Indiana University)

Memorial Stadium, also known as The Rock, is a stadium in Bloomington, Indiana. It is primarily used for football, and is the home field of the Indiana Hoosiers. The stadium opened in 1960 as part of a new athletics area at the university and currently has a capacity of 52,626. It replaced the original Memorial Stadium, built in 1925, a 20,000-seat stadium located on 10th Street where the arboretum now stands.

Ranveer Singh

Ranveer Singh Bhavnani (born 6 July 1985) is an Indian actor who appears in Hindi films. The recipient of several awards, including three Filmfare Awards, Singh is among the highest-paid actors in the country and has featured in Forbes India's Celebrity 100 list since 2012.

After completing a bachelor's degree from Indiana University Bloomington, Singh returned to India to pursue a career in film. He briefly worked in advertising and went on to make his acting debut in 2010 with a leading role in Yash Raj Films' romantic comedy Band Baaja Baaraat. The film emerged as a critical and commercial success, earning him a Filmfare Award for Best Male Debut. He went on to play a melancholic thief in the drama Lootera (2013), and established himself in Hindi cinema with his collaborations with Sanjay Leela Bhansali, beginning with the romance Goliyon Ki Raasleela Ram-Leela (2013).

Singh went on to gain critical acclaim for portraying Bajirao I and Alauddin Khilji in Bhansali's period dramas Bajirao Mastani (2015) and Padmaavat (2018), respectively. He won the Filmfare Award for Best Actor for the former and the Filmfare Critics Award for Best Actor for the latter. These along with the action film Simmba (2018), in which he played the title character, rank among the highest-grossing Indian films of all time. He also received praise for playing a rapper in Zoya Akhtar's musical drama Gully Boy (2019). Singh is married to Deepika Padukone, his co-star in the Bhansali films.

Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall

Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall is a 17,222-seat arena on the campus of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. It is the home of the Indiana Hoosiers men's basketball and women's basketball teams. It opened in 1971, replacing the current Gladstein Fieldhouse. The court is named after Branch McCracken, the men's basketball coach who led the school to its first two NCAA National Championships in 1940 and 1953. Basketball sportscaster Gus Johnson called the Assembly Hall "the Carnegie Hall of basketball."

The American Historical Review

The American Historical Review is the official publication of the American Historical Association. It targets readers interested in all periods and facets of history. It has been described as the premier journal of American history in the world, and is also highly respected as a general historical journal.

It was established in 1895 as a joint effort between the history department at Cornell University and its counterpart at Harvard, modeled on The English Historical Review and the French Revue historique, "for the promotion of historical studies, the collection and preservation of historical documents and artifacts, and the dissemination of historical research."

The journal is published in February, April, June, October and December as a book-like academic publication with research papers and book reviews, among other items (each issue typically runs to about 400 pages). Each year approximately 25 articles and review essays and 1,000 book reviews are published.

The editorial offices are located at Indiana University Bloomington, where a small staff produces the publication under the guidance of a 12-member advisory board. From the October 2007 issue until 2011, the journal was published by the University of Chicago Press. In September 2011, it was announced that the journal would be published by Oxford University Press, beginning in 2012.

Indiana University

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