Indian Distinguished Service Medal

The Indian Distinguished Service Medal (IDSM) was a military decoration awarded by the British Empire to Indian citizens serving in the Indian armed forces and police. When it was instituted in 1907 it was the second highest award available to Indians, behind the Indian Order of Merit, however, when eligibility for the Victoria Cross was extended to cover all Commonwealth subjects in 1911, the IDSM became third highest in the order of precedence. It was instituted in order to recognise acts of gallantry that did not meet the standards required of the IOM.[1] Following the Partition and subsequent independence of India in 1947, it was decided to discontinue the award.[2]

Upon being instituted the medal was only available to members of the British Indian Army, Indian State Forces, militias and levies, however, after 1917 it was extended to 'non-combatant' followers, such as carriers and grooms. In 1929 eligibility was extended to the Royal Indian Marine and to the Indian Air Force in 1940.[1]

There were four versions of the medal, the only difference being the monarch depicted on the obverse.[2] The medals were issued either with the engraved or impressed details of the recipient, including service number, name and regiment.[1]

The medal is considered reasonably rare and only about 6,000 were awarded, including bars. About 3,200 were awarded during the First World War, and 1,200 from the start of the Second World War to 1947. The remaining 1,600 were awarded between the wars during frontier fighting and other inter-war campaigns such as the Iraq campaign of 1919–20.[1]

Indian Distinguished Service Medal
Indian Distinguished Service Medal Ribbon
Medal ribbon
Awarded by British Empire
TypeMilitary decoration
EligibilityIndian citizens in the armed forces and police
Awarded forDistinguished service
StatusDiscontinued in 1947
DescriptionRibbon: blue and red ribbon

Medal: round silver medallion
Obverse:profile of reigning monarch

Reverse: inscribed 'For distinguished service', surrounded by a laurel.[1]
ClaspsNo clasps
Post-nominalsIDSM
Statistics
Established25 June 1907[2]
Total awardedapprox 6,000 including bars[1]
Order of Wear
Next (higher)King's African Rifles Distinguished Conduct Medal[3]
Next (lower)Union of South Africa Queen's Medal for Bravery (Silver)[3]

Notable recipients

Honorary Captain and Subedar Major(Retired)U.M.Rai,IDSM,1944,3/10 Gorkha Rifles

  • Risaldar Amir Singh Sudan, IDSM & Bar. 6th King Edward’s Own Cavalry.
  • Havildar Puran Singh, MM, IDSM, 3/14th Punjab Regiment, British Indian Army (https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/36730/supplement/4572)
  • Dafadar Mirza Muhammad Ali Beg, IDSM - France (20th Deccan Horse, ISDM)[4]
  • Hon. Captain and Subedar (retd), Sardar Bahadur, Sant Singh Mangat, IOM, IDSM, OBI (1st Class, 1931), British Indian Army.[5]
  • Jemadar Abdul Latif Khan Tarin, IDSM, 82nd Punjabis, British Indian Army.[6][7]
  • Khan Saheb Subedar Allauddin, IDSM, 1915/16, served in 99 Hyderabad Regiment
  • Subedar Mir Afzal Khan, IDSM, 25th Punjabis, British Indian Army.[8]
  • Subedar Ahmed Khan, OBI, IDSM, Queen Victoria's Own Corps of Guides, British Indian Army.[9]
  • Jemadar Ram Singh, IDSM, 25th Mountain Battery, British Indian Army.[10]
  • Subedar Shah Zaman Khan, IDSM, QVO Corps of Guides, British Indian Army.[11]
  • Naik Balwant Singh, IDSM, The Sikh Regiment, British Indian Army.[12]
  • Risaldar Rawat Singh Mertiya, IDSM Sindarli (34th Prince Albert Victor's Own Poona Horse, IDSM, France)[13]
  • Sardar Bahadur Risaldar Major Chander Singh Rathore, IDSM, of Dhingsara&Bajekan (Jodhpur Risala) 1921, later served as A.D.C to King George Vth.
  • Subedar Kifayat Ullah, IDSM 1918 (32nd Mountain Battery British India Army)
  • Risaldar-Major Muhammad Ashraf Khan, IOM, IDSM, RIASC, Force K6. Received the IDSM in the Tribal Areas of NWFP in 1935 and the IOM for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.[14]
  • Subadar Major Attar Singh, OBI, IDSM, Bahadur [35th Sikhs, 2nd Battalion], 1920[15], British Indian Army

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f Duckers 2001, pp. 40–41.
  2. ^ a b c Robertson, Megan. "Medals of the United Kingdom". Medals of the World. Medals.org. Retrieved 27 May 2009.
  3. ^ a b "No. 56878". The London Gazette (Supplement). 17 March 2003. p. 3352.
  4. ^ http://glosters.tripod.com/ICawards1.htm
  5. ^ London Gazette, Monday, 10 April 1911
  6. ^ S Najumddin, List of Some Better-Known IDSM Recipients British Indian Army during World War 1, in Durbar Journal of the Indian Military Historical Society UK, No 3, Autumn 2011
  7. ^ Also see record in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission database at http://www.cwgc.org
  8. ^ Durbar List 2011 a.a.
  9. ^ Durbar List 2011,a.a.
  10. ^ Durbar List 2011
  11. ^ Indian Army List (IAL)1925
  12. ^ Durbar List 2011 aa
  13. ^ http://glosters.trkhcom/ICawards1.htm
  14. ^ http://www.brownpundits.com/2016/10/25/film-royal-indian-army-service-corps-in/ Brown Pundits site giving details of Force K6 in WW2. Retrieved 30/3/2018
  15. ^ https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/32131/supplement/11317/data.htm

References

  • Duckers, Peter (2001). British Gallantry Awards, 1855–2000. London: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-0-7478-0516-8.

External links

1915 Birthday Honours

The 1915 Birthday Honours were appointments by King George V to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the British Empire. The appointments were made to celebrate the official birthday of The King, and were published in The London Gazette and in The Times on 3 June 1915.Many of the honours were awarded for efforts in the war. The Times noted, "The lists of Honours conferred on the occasion of the King's Birthday reflect the mood of the time, and contain, for the most part, the names of those who have been engaged in forwarding the national cause, in one way or another." A second list of birthday honours "for services rendered in connection with military operations in the field" was released on 23 June, with appointments to date from 3 June. The list included nine recipients of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. Four of the recipients of the Victoria Cross were killed in actions and received the honour posthumously.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1917 Birthday Honours

The 1917 Birthday Honours were appointments by King George V to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the British Empire. The appointments were made to celebrate the official birthday of The King, and were published on 4 June.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

9th Deccan Horse

The Deccan Horse or 9 HORSE is one of the oldest and most decorated armoured regiments of the Indian Army, which was a regular cavalry regiment of the British Indian Army, the Royal Deccan Horse. It was formed from the amalgamation of two regiments after World War I. They saw service from the Mutiny of 1857 up to and including World War II.

African Distinguished Conduct Medal

The African Distinguished Conduct Medal was a military decoration awarded to native soldiers of the Royal West African Frontier Force and the King's African Rifles for gallantry in action. Sometimes known as the Royal West African Frontier Force Distinguished Conduct Medal or King's African Rifles Distinguished Conduct Medal, it could also be awarded to the Somaliland Camel Corps and the Nyasaland Regiment.The medal was awarded until 1942 when it was replaced by the Imperial Distinguished Conduct Medal.

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Distinguished Conduct Medal

The Distinguished Conduct Medal, post-nominal letters DCM, was established in 1854 by Queen Victoria as a decoration for gallantry in the field by other ranks of the British Army. It is the oldest British award for gallantry and was a second level military decoration, ranking below the Victoria Cross, until its discontinuation in 1993 when it was replaced by the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross. The medal was also awarded to non-commissioned military personnel of other Commonwealth Dominions and Colonies.

Distinguished Service Medal

Distinguished Service Medal (DSM) is a high award of a nation.

Examples include:

Distinguished Service Medal (Australia) (established 1991), awarded to personnel of the Australian Defence Force for distinguished leadership in action

Indian Distinguished Service Medal (established 1907), awarded by the British Empire to Indian citizens serving in the Indian armed forces and police

Distinguished Service Medal (Ireland), a series of three decorations issued by the Irish Defence Forces

Medal of Distinguished Service (Israel) (established 1970), awarded for exemplary bravery in the line of duty

Distinguished Service Medal (Mexico), awarded to Army and Air Force personnel who demonstrate initiative and dedication throughout the course of their military career

Coast Guard Auxiliary Distinguished Service Medal, Philippines (established 1972)

Vishista Seva Vibhushanaya or Distinguished Service Decoration (Sri Lanka) (established 1981), awarded for exceptional, distinguished, and loyal service over a 25-year period

State Medal of Distinguished Service (Turkey) (established 1983), for distinguished service in contribution to the Turkish State through generous action, self-sacrifice, accomplishment or merit

Turkish Armed Forces Medal of Distinguished Service (established 1967), bestowed upon individuals whose contributions to the strengthening of the Turkish Armed Forces have been extraordinarily high

Distinguished Service Medal (United Kingdom) (1914–1993), awarded to non-commissioned officers of the Royal Navy and other Commonwealth navies for bravery and resourcefulness on active service

IDSM

IDSM may refer to:

The Indian Distinguished Service Medal

The Hong Kong Immigration Service Medal for Distinguished Service

Indian Order of Merit

The Indian Order of Merit (IOM) was a military and civilian decoration of British India. It was established in 1837, (General Order of the Governor-General of India, No. 94 of 1 May 1837) although following the Partition of India in 1947 it was decided to discontinue the award and in 1954 a separate Indian honours system was developed, to act retrospectively to 1947. For a long period of time the IOM was the highest decoration that a native member of the British Indian Army could receive and initially it had three divisions. This was changed in 1911 when Indian servicemen became eligible for the Victoria Cross. A civilian division of the IOM also existed between 1902 and 1939, however, it was only conferred very rarely.

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Man Bahadur Rai

Man Bahadur Rai AC, MC, IDSM (10 January 1914 – 14 February 2011) was a highly decorated Indian Army Gorkha officer and a recipient of the Ashoka Chakra, the highest peacetime Indian gallantry decoration. Only the fourth Ashoka Chakra recipient to be decorated while living, he was the third Indian Army serviceman and the first Indian Army officer to have been honoured while alive.

Orders, decorations, and medals of Hong Kong

The existing Hong Kong honours system was created after transfer of government of Hong Kong to the People's Republic of China as a special administrative region in 1997. Before that, Hong Kong was a British dependent territory and followed the British honours system. The HKSAR Government does not maintain any records of pre 1997 awards including gallantry awards.

Rana Chhina

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Ranjit Lal Jetley

Maj-General Ranjit Lal Jetley, FIE, FIQA (10 March 1923 – 30 March 2018) was an Indian soldier and scientist. He served in World War II and the 1947 Indo-Pakistani War, becoming an artillery regiment commander. He went on to work in armaments research and development, his innovations including an Indian 10mm light field gun and upgunning of the Sherman tanks. He also contributed to set up two major laboratories. Jetley retired in 1979 and moved to the United Kingdom.

Ranjit Singh Dyal

Lieutenant General Ranjit Singh Dyal, PVSM, MVC (15 November 1928 – 29 January 2012) was an Indian Army general and an administrator. As a soldier, Ranjit Singh led the capture of the Haji Pir pass by the Indian army during the 1965 war with Pakistan. He also drew up the plans for Operation Blue Star, and served as the General-Officer-Commanding-in-Chief of the Southern Command. Later, he served as Lieutenant Governor of Puducherry and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

Sindarli

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Subramanian (GC)

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Union of South Africa King's Medal for Bravery, Silver

The Union of South Africa King's Medal for Bravery, Silver is the lesser of two classes of a South African civil decoration for acts of bravery that was in use from 1939 to 1952, when the country was a constitutional monarchy in the British Commonwealth. The medal was instituted by King George VI on 23 June 1939.

Union of South Africa Queen's Medal for Bravery, Silver

The Union of South Africa Queen's Medal for Bravery, Silver is the lesser of two classes of a South African civil decoration for acts of bravery that was in use from 1952 to 1961, while the country was still a constitutional monarchy in the British Commonwealth. The decoration was instituted by Queen Elizabeth II on 15 December 1952.

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