Importance of religion by country

This page charts a list of countries by importance of religion.

Countries by importance of religion.svg
Results of a 2008/2009 Gallup poll on whether respondents said that religion was "important in [their] daily life."[1][2]
  90%-100%
  80%-89%
  70%-79%
  60%-69%
  50%-59%
  40%-49%
  30%-39%
  20%-29%
  10%-19%
  0%-9%
  No data

Methodology

The table below is based upon global Gallup Poll in 2009 research which asked "Is religion important in your daily life?". Percentages for "yes" and "no" answers are listed below; they often do not add up to 100% because some answered "don't know" or did not answer.[1]

Countries

Country Yes, important[1] No, unimportant[1]
 Estonia 16% 78%
 Sweden 17% 82%
 Denmark 19% 80%
 Norway[a] 21% 78%
 Czech Republic[a] 21% 75%
 Japan 24% 75%
 Hong Kong 24% 74%
 United Kingdom 27% 73%
 Finland[a] 28% 70%
 Vietnam 30% 69%
 France 30% 69%
 Australia[a] 32% 68%
 The Netherlands[a] 33% 67%
 New Zealand[a] 33% 66%
 Belgium[a] 33% 58%
 Cuba[a] 34% 64%
 Bulgaria[a] 34% 62%
 Russia 34% 66%
 Belarus 34% 56%
 Luxembourg 39% 59%
 Hungary 39% 58%
 Albania 39% 53%
 Latvia 39% 58%
 Germany 40% 59%
 Uruguay 41% 59%
  Switzerland 41% 57%
 Canada 42% 57%
 Lithuania 42% 49%
 South Korea 43% 56%
 Kazakhstan 43% 48%
 Taiwan[a] 45% 54%
 Ukraine 46% 48%
 Slovenia 47% 52%
 Slovakia[a] 47% 52%
 Spain 49% 51%
 Azerbaijan 50% 49%
 Israel 51% 48%
 Serbia 54% 44%
 Ireland 54% 46%
 Austria[a] 55% 43%
 Uzbekistan 59% 38%
 Belize[a] 62% 33%
 Argentina 65% 34%
 United States 69% 31%
 Croatia 70% 28%
 Chile 70% 29%
 Singapore 70% 29%
 Jamaica[a] 70% 30%
 Montenegro 71% 28%
 Greece 71% 28%
 Portugal[a] 72% 26%
 Italy 72% 25%
 Moldova 72% 19%
 Kyrgyzstan 72% 25%
 Iran[a] 73% 26%
 Mexico 73% 25%
 Armenia 73% 25%
 Poland 75% 19%
 Haiti[a] 75% 23%
 Cyprus 75% 25%
 North Macedonia 76% 22%
 Botswana[a] 77% 23%
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 77% 21%
 Venezuela 79% 21%
 Costa Rica 79% 20%
 Turkmenistan 80% 18%
 Togo[a] 80% 13%
 Georgia 81% 16%
 Turkey 82% 15%
 Ecuador 82% 17%
 Colombia 83% 16%
 El Salvador 83% 16%
 Peru 84% 14%
 Iraq 84% 11%
 Nicaragua 84% 15%
 Honduras 84% 15%
 Romania 84% 12%
 South Africa 85% 15%
 Puerto Rico[a] 85% 14%
 Tajikistan 85% 12%
 Mozambique[a] 86% 14%
 Malta 86% 10%
 Brazil 87% 13%
 Dominican Republic 87% 13%
 Lebanon 87% 12%
 Zimbabwe 88% 12%
 Cote d'Ivoire 88% 12%
 Burkina Faso[a] 88% 12%
 Panama 88% 11%
 Angola[a] 88% 11%
 Guatemala 88% 9%
 Tanzania 89% 11%
 Bolivia 89% 10%
 Syria 89% 9%
 India 90% 9%
 Kosovo 90% 8%
 United Arab Emirates 91% 8%
 Kuwait 91% 6%
 Namibia[a] 92% 9%
 Trinidad and Tobago[a] 92% 8%
 Paraguay 92% 8%
 Pakistan 92% 6%
 State of Palestine 93% 7%
 Sudan 93% 7%
 Uganda 93% 7%
 Madagascar[a] 93% 7%
 Benin[a] 93% 7%
   Nepal 93% 6%
 Tunisia 93% 5%
 Saudi Arabia 93% 4%
 Central African Republic[a] 94% 6%
 Kenya 94% 6%
 Liberia[a] 94% 6%
 Democratic Republic of the Congo 94% 5%
 Bahrain 94% 4%
 Ghana 95% 5%
 Zambia 95% 5%
 Qatar 95% 4%
 Algeria 95% 4%
 Chad 95% 5%
 Rwanda 95% 5%
 Republic of the Congo[a] 95% 5%
 Mali 95% 3%
 Philippines 96% 4%
 Cameroon 96% 4%
 Malaysia 96% 3%
 Nigeria 96% 3%
 Cambodia 96% 3%
 Senegal 96% 4%
 Jordan[a] 96% 4%
 Myanmar[a] 97% 3%
 Afghanistan 97% 3%
 Laos[a] 97% 3%
 Guinea[a] 97% 3%
 Morocco 97% 2%
 Egypt 97% 2%
 Comoros 97% 2%
 Thailand 97% 2%
 Burundi 98% 2%
 Djibouti 98% 2%
 Mauritania 98% 2%
 Sri Lanka 99% 1%
 Malawi 99% 1%
 Indonesia 99% 1%
 Yemen 99% 1%
 Niger 100% 0%
 Ethiopia 100% 0%
 Somalia[a] 100% 0%
 Bangladesh 100% 0%
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai Data from an older 2008 survey[3]

See also

General:

References

  1. ^ a b c d Crabtree, Steve. "Religiosity Highest in World's Poorest Nations". Gallup. Retrieved 27 May 2015. (in which numbers have been rounded)
  2. ^ GALLUP WorldView - data accessed on 17 january 2009
  3. ^ GALLUP WorldView - data accessed on 17 january 2009
Fundamentalism

Fundamentalism usually has a religious connotation that indicates unwavering attachment to a set of irreducible beliefs. However, fundamentalism has come to be applied to a tendency among certain groups–mainly, although not exclusively, in religion–that is characterized by a markedly strict literalism as it is applied to certain specific scriptures, dogmas, or ideologies, and a strong sense of the importance of maintaining ingroup and outgroup distinctions, leading to an emphasis on purity and the desire to return to a previous ideal from which advocates believe members have strayed. Rejection of diversity of opinion as applied to these established "fundamentals" and their accepted interpretation within the group often results from this tendency.Depending upon the context, the label "fundamentalism" can be a pejorative rather than a neutral characterization, similar to the ways that calling political perspectives "right-wing" or "left-wing" can have for some negative connotations.

Irreligion

Irreligion (adjective form: non-religious or irreligious) is the absence, indifference to, rejection of, or hostility towards religion.Irreligion may include some forms of theism, depending on the religious context it is defined against; for example, in 18th-century Europe, the epitome of irreligion was deism, while in contemporary East Asia the shared term meaning "irreligion" or "no religion" (無宗教, Chinese pron. wú zōngjiào, Japanese pron. mu shūkyō Korean pron. Mukyo), with which the majority of East Asian populations identify themselves, implies non-membership in one of the institutional religions (such as Buddhism and Christianity) and not necessarily non-belief in traditional folk religions collectively represented by Chinese Shendao and Japanese Shinto (both meaning "ways of gods").According to the Pew Research Center's 2012 global study of 230 countries and territories, 16% of the world's population is not affiliated with a religion, while 84% are affiliated. By 2060, according to their projections, the number of unaffiliated will increase by over 35 million, but the percentage will decrease to 13% because the total population will grow faster.According to cross-cultural studies, secularism is expected to decline throughout the 21st century since religion and fertility are positively related, while secularism and fertility are negatively related.

Irreligion in Canada

Irreligion is common throughout all provinces and territories of Canada. Irreligious Canadians include atheists, agnostics, and humanists. The surveys may also include those who are deists, spiritual and pantheists. The 2011 Canadian census reported that 23.9% of Canadians declare no religious affiliation. According to Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance, among those estimated 4.9 million Canadians of no religion, an estimated 1.9 million would specify atheist, 1.8 million would specify agnostic, and 1.2 million humanist.

List of U.S. states and territories by religiosity

The degree of religiosity in the population of the United States can be compared to that in other countries and compared state-by-state, based on individual self-assessment and polling data.

List of countries by irreligion

Irreligion, which may include deism, agnosticism, ignosticism, anti-religion, atheism, skepticism, ietsism, spiritual but not religious, freethought, anti-theism, apatheism, non-belief, pandeism, secular humanism, non-religious theism, pantheism and panentheism, varies in the different countries around the world. According to reports from the Worldwide Independent Network/Gallup International Association's (WIN/GIA) four global polls: in 2005, 77% were a religious person and 4% were "convinced atheists" while in 2012, 23% were not a religious person and an additional 13% were "convinced atheists"; in 2015, 22% were not a religious person and an additional 11% were "convinced atheists"; and in 2017, 25% were not a religious person and an additional 9% were "convinced atheists".According to sociologist Phil Zuckerman, broad estimates of those who have an absence of belief in a God range from 500 to 750 million people worldwide. According to sociologists Ariela Keysar and Juhem Navarro-Rivera's review of numerous global studies on atheism, there are 450 to 500 million positive atheists and agnostics worldwide (7% of the world's population), with China having the most atheists in the world (200 million convinced atheists).

List of religious populations

This is a list of religious populations by number of adherents and countries.

Religions by country

This is an overview of religion by country according to the Pew Research Center. The article Religious information by country gives information from The World Factbook of the CIA and the U.S. Department of State.

Religiosity

Religiosity is difficult to define, but different scholars have seen this concept as broadly about religious orientations and involvement. It includes experiential, ritualistic, ideological, intellectual, consequential, creedal, communal, doctrinal, moral, and cultural dimensions. Sociologists of religion have observed that the people's beliefs, sense of belonging, and behavior often are not congruent with an individual's actual religious beliefs since there is much diversity in how one can be religious or not. Multiple problems exist in measuring religiosity. For instance, variables such as church attendance produce different results when different methods are used such as traditional surveys vs time use surveys.

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