Ian Desmond

Ian M. Desmond (born September 20, 1985) is an American professional baseball infielder and outfielder for the Colorado Rockies of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Washington Nationals and Texas Rangers. Desmond is a three-time Silver Slugger Award winner and a two-time MLB All-Star. While primarily a shortstop early in his career, Desmond began playing primarily left field, center field, and first base starting in 2016.

Ian Desmond
Ian Desmond (28657399001)
Desmond with the Texas Rangers in 2016
Colorado Rockies – No. 20
Outfielder / Shortstop / First baseman
Born: September 20, 1985 (age 33)
Sarasota, Florida
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
September 10, 2009, for the Washington Nationals
MLB statistics
(through July 14, 2019)
Batting average.264
Hits1,393
Home runs172
Runs batted in692
Stolen bases179
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Professional career

Minor leagues

The Montreal Expos selected Desmond in the third round of the 2004 MLB draft (84th overall). Desmond batted .227 with one home run and 27 RBIs for the Gulf Coast League Expos in 2004. He was second in the Gulf Coast League with 216 at-bats and fifth in stolen bases with 13. He had a .250 batting average with one home run and one RBI in four games for Class-A Short-Season Vermont Expos.

In 2005, Desmond batted .247 with four home runs and 23 RBIs in 73 games for Class-A Savannah Sand Gnats. He added a career-high 20 stolen bases. Desmond had a .256 batting average with three home runs and 15 RBIs in 55 games for the Class-A Advanced Potomac Nationals of the Carolina League. At season's end, he was named the best defensive shortstop in the South Atlantic League (SAL) in Baseball America's top tools survey of league managers. He was ranked as the 19th best prospect in the SAL by Baseball America.

In 2006, Desmond batted .244 with a career-high nine home runs and 45 RBIs for Potomac. He scored 50 runs and had 20 doubles in 92 games. He had a .182 batting average with no home runs and three RBIs for the Double-A Harrisburg Senators.

Desmond spent the 2007 season with Potomac and set career highs in home runs with 14, average with a .264 clip, on-base percentage with a .357 clip and doubles with 30. Desmond slugged his first homer of the season on April 17. He went 3-for-5 with a home run, double, three RBIs and scored twice on April 20. He homered in consecutive games on July 28–29 and August 12–13.

In 2008, Desmond played for Harrisburg and started the year there in 2009. In his three months there, he batted .306 and, in June, was promoted to the Triple-A Syracuse Chiefs. In 55 games with the Chiefs, he batted .354.[1] After the minor league season ended, he was called up to the Nationals.

Washington Nationals

Washington Nationals shortstop Ian Desmond
Desmond playing for the Washington Nationals in 2011

Desmond played his first major league game on September 10, 2009. He had his first hit, a double, and RBI during his second at bat. He later went on to hit his first home run during the same game.[2] He followed that up with a 4-for-4 game, and become only the second player ever (along with Guy Sturdy of the 1927 St. Louis Browns) to record at least six hits and four RBI in his first two games as a major leaguer.[3]

On March 28, 2010, after a solid spring training in which he led the team in RBIs, Desmond was awarded the Nationals' starting shortstop job, beating out incumbent Cristian Guzmán.[4][5] His first full year was a bit erratic. He booted the first ball that came to him and in the next game, hit the first home run of the season for the Nationals. Desmond ended the season batting .269 with 10 home runs and 65 runs batted in while stealing 17 bases.[6] In 2011 he batted .253/.298/.358.[7]

Desmond switched his uniform number to 20 at the beginning of the 2012 season to honor Frank Robinson.[8] On Opening Day, Desmond started at shortstop and hit leadoff for the Nationals, who played at the Cubs.[9] Desmond was selected[10] for the 2012 All Star Game, his first such selection. However, on Saturday, July 7, it was announced that Desmond was withdrawing from the game due to a sore oblique.[11] The oblique injury persisted, forcing the Nationals to place Desmond on the 15-day disabled list on July 23.[12]

At the encouragement of manager Davey Johnson,[13] Desmond became a very aggressive hitter. He was second in the National League, and seventh in the majors, in percent of pitches swung at in the 2012 season (55%).[14] With his 18th home run of the season on August 20, Desmond set a franchise record for homers by a shortstop.[15] On September 24, Desmond became the first Nationals player since 2006 to join the 20 home run – 20 steal club when he stole his 20th base. He had already hit 24 home runs.[16] Desmond was awarded a Silver Slugger for his offensive prowess in the 2012 season.[17]

In 2013, Desmond repeated both his 20 home run – 20 steal season[18] and his Silver Slugger Award.[19] He batted .280 with 20 home runs, 80 runs batted in and 21 stolen bases in 158 games played.[20]

2014 saw Desmond win his third straight Silver Slugger at shortstop, batting .255/.313/.430 with 24 home runs and 91 RBI.[20] He also was 2nd in the league in power-speed number (24.0).[21]

Desmond struggled both offensively and defensively throughout the 2015 season. In 156 games, he hit .233/.290/.384 with 19 home runs and 62 RBI, and committed 27 errors in the field.[20] At the end of the season, he became a free agent.

Texas Rangers

Ian Desmond on June 28, 2016
Desmond batting for the Texas Rangers in 2016

After rejecting a $15.8 million qualifying offer from the Nationals, Desmond remained a free agent until February 29, 2016, when he signed a one-year, $8 million contract with the Texas Rangers.[22] Desmond was expected to play primarily in the outfield rather than as a shortstop for the Rangers. He made his first appearances in left and center field during Cactus League action in March 2016.[23]

Desmond was selected as an American League All-Star to represent the Rangers at the 2016 Major League Baseball All-Star Game in San Diego along with teammate Cole Hamels. Prior to the game, Desmond was batting .322 with 15 home runs and 55 RBIs. Desmond finished the 2016 season with a batting average of .285, 22 home runs, and 86 RBIs. The Rangers lost in the 2016 ALDS, being swept by the Blue Jays in three games. In the series Desmond went 3-for-14 (.214) with 2 RBIs.

Colorado Rockies

On December 13, 2016, Desmond signed a five-year contract with the Colorado Rockies.[24][25] During a spring training game on March 13, 2017, Desmond was hit by a pitch on his left hand. The injury resulted in a metacarpal fracture, requiring surgery.[26] He appeared in his first game for the Rockies on April 30 in left field, due to the strong play of first baseman Mark Reynolds.[27]

In 2018, he batted .236/.307/.422. For the 2018 season, he had the highest ground ball percentage of all major league hitters (62.0%).[28]

Personal life

Desmond has a younger brother, Chris Charron.[8] Desmond and fellow major league player Josh Roenicke are brothers-in-law; Roenicke, a pitcher who played for the Minnesota Twins through 2013 and signed a minor league deal with the Nationals for 2014,[29] married Desmond's sister Nikki in 2010.[30] In January 2010, Ian married his wife Chelsey,[31] whom he met in the fifth grade.[32] The couple has four children together. When his first child was born, Desmond became one of the first players to claim paternity leave, which had just been introduced to MLB.[33][34] The family lives in Sarasota, Florida.[32]

While with the Nationals, Desmond served on the board of the Washington Nationals Youth Baseball Academy, which opened in 2014.[35][36]

Desmond is a national spokesperson for the Children's Tumor Foundation[37].

Desmond is related to Viola Desmond, a Canadian civil rights activist.

References

  1. ^ "Ian Desmond Stats, Bio, Photos, Highlights". MiLB.com. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  2. ^ Sheinin, Dave (September 11, 2009). "Desmond Shines in Big League Debut as Nats Beat Phillies". The Washington Post. ISSN 0740-5421. Retrieved September 11, 2009.
  3. ^ Zuckerman, Mark (September 15, 2009). "Nats' Desmond making most of his call-up: Infielder's start rates among best ever in majors". The Washington Times. Retrieved September 16, 2009.
  4. ^ Ladson, Bill (March 28, 2010). "Desmond awarded starting shortstop job". MLB.com. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  5. ^ Kilgore, Adam (March 29, 2010). "Ian Desmond will start at shortstop for Washington Nationals". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 7, 2010.
  6. ^ Kilgore, Adam (April 8, 2010). "Fast times at shortstop for Ian Desmond". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 7, 2010.
  7. ^ Ian Desmond Stats | Baseball-Reference.com
  8. ^ a b Kilgore, Adam (April 2, 2012). "Nationals' Ian Desmond believes it will all come together this season". Washington Post. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  9. ^ Ladson, Bill (April 5, 2012). "Desmond leads things off with big day in win". MLB.com.
  10. ^ Nowak, Joey (July 1, 2012). "Stras, Desmond, Gio selected as NL All-Stars". MLB.com. Retrieved July 7, 2012.
  11. ^ Wagner, James (July 7, 2012). "Ian Desmond to miss all-star game because of sore oblique". Washington Post. Retrieved July 7, 2012.
  12. ^ "Nationals put SS Desmond on DL, promote OF Brown". Yahoo!. Associated Press. Retrieved July 24, 2012.
  13. ^ "Nationals Buzz: Wrapping up the Nats' 3-2 win over Miami". MASN Sports. Retrieved September 17, 2012.
  14. ^ "Major League Leaderboards » 2012 » Batters » Plate Discipline Statistics". Fangraphs. Retrieved November 19, 2012.
  15. ^ Comak, Amanda (August 21, 2012). "Edwin Jackson's notable warm-up and Ian Desmond's notable home run". The Washington Times. Retrieved September 17, 2012.
  16. ^ Comak, Amanda (September 24, 2012). "Ian Desmond becomes Nationals' first 20-20 player since Alfonso Soriano". The Washington Times. Retrieved October 3, 2012.
  17. ^ Wagner, James (November 8, 2012). "Ian Desmond, Adam LaRoche, Stephen Strasburg win Silver Slugger Awards". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 19, 2012.
  18. ^ Wagner, James (September 23, 2013). "Ian Desmond records back-to-back 20-20 seasons". The Washington Post. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  19. ^ Kilgore, Adam (November 6, 2013). "Ian Desmond wins second consecutive Silver Slugger award". The Washington Post. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  20. ^ a b c "Ian Desmond Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 29, 2016.
  21. ^ 2014 National League Batting Leaders | Baseball-Reference.com
  22. ^ Sullivan, T.R. (February 29, 2016). "Rangers, Desmond complete 1-year deal". MLB.com. Retrieved February 29, 2016.
  23. ^ Wilson, Jeff (March 23, 2016). "Ian Desmond continues to impress Texas Rangers with outfield play". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved March 25, 2016.
  24. ^ Ian Desmond agrees to five-year deal with Rockies
  25. ^ Rockies, Desmond reportedly agree to deal
  26. ^ Harding, Thomas. "Desmond headed for surgery, out indefinitely". MLB. Retrieved March 14, 2017.
  27. ^ Ian Desmond likely to make Rockies debut Sunday, in left field, not at first base
  28. ^ Major League Leaderboards » 2018 » Batters » Batted Ball Statistics | FanGraphs Baseball
  29. ^ Wagner, James (February 14, 2014). "Nationals ink reliever Josh Roenicke, Ian Desmond's brother-in-law, to minor league deal". The Washington Post. Retrieved February 14, 2014.
  30. ^ Rosecrans, C. Trent. "Nats' Ian Desmond takes brother-in-law deep". Retrieved July 7, 2012.
  31. ^ "5 Cutest Pregnancy Announcements from Athletes". CBS DC. February 14, 2015. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  32. ^ a b Svrluga, Barry (May 9, 2014). "The Wife". Washington Post. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  33. ^ James, Chelsea (October 4, 2014). "With third son coming soon, no paternity leave available for Ian Desmond". Washington Post. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  34. ^ Schad, Tom (October 4, 2014). "Birth of son not expected to keep Desmond out of NLDS games". Washington Times. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  35. ^ Kilgore, Adam (March 30, 2014). "Ian Desmond has become the backbone of the Washington Nationals". Washington Post. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  36. ^ Wagner, James (March 29, 2014). "Ribbon cut on Nationals Youth Baseball Academy in Southeast". Washington Post. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  37. ^ Desmond Family Presents Check to Help Fight NF

External links

2004 Major League Baseball draft

The 2004 First-Year Player Draft, Major League Baseball's annual amateur draft, was held on June 7 and 8. It was conducted via conference call with representatives from each of the league's 30 teams. The draft marked the first time three players from the same university were chosen in the

first ten picks.

Source: MLB.com 2004 Draft Tracker

2010 Washington Nationals season

The Washington Nationals' 2010 season was the sixth season for the American baseball franchise of Major League Baseball in the District of Columbia, and the 42nd since the original team was started in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It involved the Nationals attempting to win the National League East Division after a 59–103 season the year before – the worst record of any MLB team in 2009. Jim Riggleman was kept as full-time manager after being instituted on July 12, 2009 after Manny Acta's firing.

Highlights from the season include Stephen Strasburg's 14-strikeout Major League debut on June 8 against the Pittsburgh Pirates and a bench-clearing brawl on September 1 at the Florida Marlins.

The Nationals finished 2010 in last place in the NL East for the third year in a row with a 69-93 record, though they did have a ten-game improvement from 2009. They had a 41-40 record at home, their first winning home record since 2006.

Third baseman Ryan Zimmerman won the Silver Slugger Award for the second straight year as the best offensive third baseman in the National League.

2011 Washington Nationals season

The Washington Nationals' 2011 season was the seventh season for the American baseball franchise of Major League Baseball in the District of Columbia and the 43rd since the original team was started in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It involved the Nationals attempting to win the National League East Division after a 69-93 season the year before.

On June 23, 2011, manager Jim Riggleman resigned after contract disputes with general manager Mike Rizzo. Riggleman resigned following a 1-0 win over the Seattle Mariners which put the Nationals over .500 at the latest point in a season since 2005 and gave them their 11th win in 12 games. Riggleman compiled a 140-172 record with the Nationals after he replaced Manny Acta after the all-star break in 2009. On June 24, Davey Johnson was named the new manager. Previously, he was a senior advisor to Mike Rizzo. He began managing on June 27. Bench coach John McLaren managed the club for three games following Riggleman's resignation before Johnson was decided upon as interim manager.

The Nationals finished the 2011 season in third place in the NL East with an 80-81 record, playing only 161 games because one game against the Los Angeles Dodgers was canceled due to rain. Their third-place finish was their best finish in the standings and second-best win-loss record since they moved to Washington.

2012 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2012 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 83rd edition of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. It was held on July 10, 2012, during the 2012 Major League Baseball season at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri, home of the Kansas City Royals. This marked the third time the Mid-summer Classic had been played in Kansas City, with Kauffman Stadium (then named Royals Stadium) last hosting the event in 1973, the stadium's first year of existence. The event was also held at Municipal Stadium in 1960, when the Athletics were still based there, one of two played that season. The game was televised in the United States by Fox.

The National League shut out the American League for the sixth time in All-Star Game history. It was the third-largest margin of victory for any Mid-summer Classic. The TV ratings fell even further than the 2011 edition, earning a 6.8 rating and 12 share on Fox. The total number of viewers who watched any portion of the game was up 7 percent from the previous year, however, with 27.7 million total viewers.

2012 Washington Nationals season

The Washington Nationals' 2012 season was the eighth season for the baseball franchise of Major League Baseball in the District of Columbia, the fifth season at Nationals Park, and the 44th since the original team was started in Montreal, Quebec. After finishing the previous season in third place with an 80–81 record, out of last place in the NL East for the second time since moving to Washington, the Nationals made several moves to pursue playoff contention in 2012 and beyond. Despite being plagued with injuries, the Nationals had an impressive start to the season, never dropping below the .500 mark and consistently holding first or second place in their division. On September 3, the Nationals won their 82nd game of the season, making this season their first winning season since moving to Washington, D.C. in 2005 and the first for the franchise since 2003. On September 20, the Nationals beat the Los Angeles Dodgers to clinch the franchise's first postseason berth since 1981, and the first for a Washington-based team since the Washington Senators won the American League pennant in 1933. On October 1, the Nationals clinched the National League East division. On October 3, they went on to clinch the best record in Major League Baseball at 98-64. They finished the season with a 98-64 record and played the St. Louis Cardinals in the Divisional Series. On October 12, in Game 5 of the NLDS, they lost to the Cardinals 9-7 and were eliminated.

2013 Washington Nationals season

The 2013 Washington Nationals season was the Nationals' ninth season for the baseball franchise of Major League Baseball in the District of Columbia, the sixth season at Nationals Park, and the 45th since the original team was started in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

The Nationals finished the year 2nd place in the National League East division with an 86-76 record, but were unable to return to the postseason after their division-winning 2012 campaign. The 2013 season was also the last with manager Davey Johnson, who retired following the end of the season.

2014 National League Division Series

The 2014 National League Division Series was two best-of-five-game series to determine the participating teams in the 2014 National League Championship Series. The Washington Nationals, Los Angeles Dodgers, and St. Louis Cardinals (seeded 1–3 based on record, respectively) and San Francisco Giants—played in two series. Fox Sports 1 carried most of the games, with two of the games on MLB Network.

These matchups were:

(1) Washington Nationals (East Division champion, 96–66) vs. (5) San Francisco Giants (Wild Card Winner, 88–74)

(2) Los Angeles Dodgers (West Division champion, 94–68) vs. (3) St. Louis Cardinals (Central Division champion, 90–72)This was the first postseason meeting between the Nationals and Giants. The Dodgers and Cardinals met in the postseason for the fifth time, with the Cardinals having won three of the first four matchups, including the previous year's NLCS which the Cardinals won 4 games to 2.

2014 Washington Nationals season

The 2014 Washington Nationals season was the Nationals' tenth season for the baseball franchise of Major League Baseball in the District of Columbia, the seventh season at Nationals Park, and the 46th since the original team was started in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. They finished the regular season with a record of 96–66, first place in the Eastern Division and with the best record in the entire National League. However, they lost to the San Francisco Giants in the National League Division Series in four games.

2017 Major League Baseball draft

The 2017 Major League Baseball (MLB) First-Year Player Draft began on June 12, 2017. The draft assigned amateur baseball players to MLB teams. The first 36 picks, including the first round and compensatory picks, were broadcast on MLB Network on June 12, while the remainder of the draft was live streamed on MLB.com on June 13 and 14.With the worst record in the 2016 MLB season, the Minnesota Twins received the first overall pick. Compensation picks were distributed for players who did not sign from the 2016 MLB Draft. Also, fourteen small-market teams competed in a lottery for additional competitive balance picks, with six teams receiving an additional pick after the first round, and eight teams receiving an additional pick after the second round. The Twins selected Royce Lewis with the first overall selection.

Adam LaRoche

David Adam LaRoche (born November 6, 1979) is an American former professional baseball first baseman who played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the Atlanta Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, Boston Red Sox, Arizona Diamondbacks, Washington Nationals and Chicago White Sox. He is the son of pitcher Dave LaRoche and the brother of third baseman Andy LaRoche.

Colorado Rockies

The Colorado Rockies are an American professional baseball team based in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) West division. The team's home venue is Coors Field, located in the Lower Downtown area of Denver. The Rockies won their first National League championship in 2007, after having won 14 of their final 15 games in order to secure a Wild Card position. In the World Series they were swept by the American League (AL) champion Boston Red Sox in four games.

Colorado Rockies all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of December 31, 2014.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Colorado Rockies franchise.

Josh Roenicke

Joshua James Roenicke (born August 4, 1982) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Uni-President Lions of the Chinese Professional Baseball League. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cincinnati Reds, Toronto Blue Jays, Colorado Rockies, and Minnesota Twins.

List of Silver Slugger Award winners at shortstop

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value." Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.Among shortstops, Barry Larkin is the leader in Silver Slugger Awards, with nine wins between 1988 and 1999, including five consecutive awards (1988–1992). Larkin is fourth all-time in Silver Slugger wins among all positions, behind outfielder Barry Bonds, catcher Mike Piazza and third baseman Alex Rodriguez, who won his first seven awards at shortstop before a position change. Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr. won eight Silver Sluggers as a shortstop from 1983 to 1993. Derek Jeter won five Silver Sluggers as a shortstop (2006–2009; 2012), while Ian Desmond (2012–2014), Alan Trammell (1987–1988, 1990), and Édgar Rentería (2000; 2002–2003) won three.Rodriguez' offensive statistics in his seven Silver Slugger-winning seasons lead American League and major league shortstops in most categories; his batting average of .358 and .631 slugging percentage in 1996, .420 on-base percentage in 2000 and 57 home runs in 2002 are records among winning shortstops. The lone category in which Rodriguez does not lead the American League is runs batted in (RBI), where Miguel Tejada is the leader; he batted in 150 runs in 2004. The RBI leader in the National League is Trevor Story, who batted in 108 runs in 2018. In contrast, Rodriguez collected RBI totals over 110 (ranging from 111 in 1999 to 142 in 2002) in all of his Silver Slugger-winning seasons, highlighting the difference in power and production between American League and National League shortstops. Other National League leaders include Larkin and Hanley Ramírez, who led in batting average (Larkin and Ramírez batted .342 in 1989 and 2009 respectively) and on-base percentage (Larkin and Ramírez with .410 in 1996 and 2009 respectively), along with Rich Aurilia, who leads in slugging percentage (.572, 2001). Aurilla is also tied with Story as the National League leader in home runs (Aurilla and Story hit 37 in 2001 and 2018 respectively). Though he has never played in the National League, Rodriguez' 40 or more home runs in six of his seven winning seasons at shortstop are greater than any total hit by a National League winner at third base.

List of Washington Nationals team records

The Washington Nationals are a United States Major League Baseball franchise based in Washington, D.C.

Rock Star (R. Kelly song)

"Rock Star" is the third single from the R. Kelly album Double Up. The song features Ludacris and Kid Rock. It is notable for its use of the guitar, a distinct departure for the usually R&B-oriented Kelly, which was a popular sound in mainstream hip hop during this time. The song peaked at number 54 on the Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart in its second week on the chart.

Silver Slugger Award

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League and the National League, as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball. These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.The prize is presented to outfielders irrespective of their specific position. This means that it is possible for three left fielders, or any other combination of outfielders, to win the award in the same year, rather than one left fielder, one center fielder, and one right fielder. In addition, only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award; lineups in the American League include a designated hitter in place of the pitcher in the batting order, so the designated hitter receives the award instead.Home run record-holder Barry Bonds won twelve Silver Slugger Awards in his career as an outfielder, the most of any player. He also won the award in five consecutive seasons twice in his career: from 1990 to 1994, and again from 2000 to 2004. Retired former New York Mets catcher Mike Piazza and former New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez are tied for second, with ten wins each. Rodriguez' awards are split between two positions; he won seven Silver Sluggers as a shortstop for the Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers, and three with the Yankees as a third baseman. Wade Boggs leads third basemen with eight Silver Slugger Awards; Barry Larkin leads shortstops with nine. Other leaders include Ryne Sandberg (seven wins as a second baseman) and Mike Hampton (five wins as a pitcher). Todd Helton and Albert Pujols are tied for the most wins among first baseman with four, although Pujols has won two awards at other positions. David Ortiz has won seven awards at designated hitter position, the most at that position.

Vermont Lake Monsters

The Vermont Lake Monsters are a Minor League Baseball team in the Class A Short Season New York–Penn League affiliated with the Oakland Athletics. The team plays its home games at Centennial Field, one of the oldest minor league stadiums, on the University of Vermont campus in Burlington, Vermont.

The team was previously located in Jamestown, New York, (as the Jamestown Expos) from 1977 to 1993.

Washington Nationals

The Washington Nationals are a professional baseball team based in Washington, D.C. The Nationals compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. From 2005 to 2007, the team played in RFK Stadium; since 2008 their home stadium has been Nationals Park on South Capitol Street in Southeast D.C., near the Anacostia River.The Nationals are the eighth major league franchise to be based in Washington, D.C., and the first since 1971. The current National League club was founded in 1969 as the Montreal Expos, part of the MLB expansion. The Expos were purchased by Major League Baseball in 2002, and the team was renamed the Nationals and moved to Washington, D.C. before the 2005 season, marking the first franchise relocation in MLB since the third Washington Senators moved to Texas in 1971.

While the team initially struggled after moving to Washington, the Nationals have experienced considerable success in recent years, winning division titles in 2012, 2014, 2016, and 2017, although they have yet to advance out of the first round in the playoffs. Two of the team's first overall picks in the MLB Draft, Stephen Strasburg in 2009 and Bryce Harper in 2010, attracted new levels of attention to the team. At the time of his selection, Strasburg was called the "most-hyped pick in draft history," and Harper later became the youngest position player to be selected to the MLB All-Star Game. Including their time in Montreal, the Nationals are one of two franchises, and the only one in the National League, never to have won a league pennant and played in a World Series, along with the Seattle Mariners of the American League.

Active roster
Inactive roster
Injured list
Coaching staff

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.