ISO 668

ISO 668 - Series 1 freight containers — Classification, dimensions and ratings is an ISO international standard which classifies intermodal freight shipping containers and standardises their size and weight specifications.[1] Introduced in 1968, ISO 668 regulates both external and internal dimensions of containers, as well as the minimum door opening size, where applicable. It also specifies the associated gross weight ratings, and requirements for load transfer areas in the base structures of containers, since amendment 1 of 2005.[2]

The current edition of the standard is version E of 2013, which integrates version E from 1995 with its two amendments of 2005.

ISO designation * Common Name External dimensions Minimum internal dimensions Maximum Gross Mass
Length Height Width Length Height Width
1EEE ** 45 foot high cube 13.716 m / 45' 0" 2.896 m / 9' 6" 2.438 m / 8' 0" 13.542 m (44' 5.15") 2.655 m (8' 8.5") 2.330 m (7' 7.73") 30480 kg / 67200 lbs
1EE ** 45 foot standard 2.591 m / 8' 6" 2.350 m (7' 8.5")
1AAA 40 foot high cube 12.192 m / 40' 0" 2.896 m / 9' 6" 2.438 m / 8' 0" 11.998 m (39' 4.375") 2.655 m (8' 8.5") 2.330 m (7' 7.73") 30480 kg / 67200 lbs
1AA 40 foot standard 2.591 m / 8' 6" 2.350 m (7' 8.5")
1A 40 foot 2.438 m / 8' 0" 2.197 m (7' 2.5")
1BBB 30 foot high cube 9.125 m / 29' 11.25" 2.896 m / 9' 6" 8.931 m (29' 3.6") 2.655 m (8' 8.5") 30480 kg / 67200 lbs ***
1BB 30 foot standard 2.591 m / 8' 6" 2.350 m (7' 8.5")
1B 30 foot 2.438 m / 8' 0" 2.197 m (7' 2.5")
1CC 20 foot standard 6.058 m / 19' 10.5" 2.591 m / 8' 6" 5.867 m (19' 3") 2.350 m (7' 8.5")
1C 20 foot 2.438 m / 8' 0" 2.197 m (7' 2.5")
1D 10 foot 2.991 m / 9' 9.75" 2.438 m / 8' 0" 2.802 m (9' 2.3") 2.197 m (7' 2.5") 10160 kg / 22400 lbs
1E **** 6½ foot 1.968 m / 6' 5.5" 2.438 m / 8' 0" 2.438 m / 8' 0" 2.197 m (7' 2.5") 2.330 m (7' 7.73") 7110 kg / 15700 lbs
1F **** 5 foot 1.460 m / 4' 9.5" 2.438 m / 8' 0" 2.197 m (7' 2.5") 5080 kg / 11200 lbs
* The standard also recognises containers less than 8 feet in height, under the designations 1AX, 1BX, 1CX and 1DX, with specifications the same as other containers of their length.
** Forty-five foot containers were added to the standard per Amendment 2 of 2005.[3]
*** The maximum gross mass rating of twenty and thirty foot units was updated with Amendment 1 of 2005.[2] Until then, the MGW for 20-ft units was 24,000 kg / 52,900 lbs, and for 30-ft units 25,400 kg / 56,000 lbs.
**** Six and a half and five foot containers (type 1E and 1F) are not in the current edition ISO 668 standard, but were standardised in previous editions,[4] and are still manufactured.[5]
The so-called width of these small-size containers may be perceived as their length, as it is their greatest horizontal dimension, and their doors are typically in the short end(s).
ISO 668
Series 1 freight containers — Classification, dimensions and ratings
Latest version6
668:2013
Preview version1995
OrganizationInternational Organization for Standardization
AbbreviationISO 668:2013

See also

  • ISO 1496-1 — Series 1 Freight Containers — Specification and Testing — Part 1, General Cargo Containers
  • ISO 6346 — standard covering the coding, identification and marking of intermodal containers

References

  1. ^ "ISO 668:2013 - Series 1 freight containers -- Classification, dimensions and ratings". www.iso.org.
  2. ^ a b ISO 668:1995 Series 1 freight containers — Classification, dimensions and ratings — AMENDMENT 1 (Technical report). ISO. 2005-09-15.
  3. ^ ISO 668:1995 Series 1 freight containers — Classification, dimensions and ratings — AMENDMENT 2: 45' containers (Technical report). ISO. 2005.
  4. ^ "Container Handbook - Section 3.2 Container dimensions and weights". www.containerhandbuch.de.
  5. ^ http://seabox.com/catalog/flyers/sb812.sg.usmc.com10.pdf

External links

Containerization

Containerization is a system of intermodal freight transport using intermodal containers (also called shipping containers and ISO containers). The containers have standardized dimensions. They can be loaded and unloaded, stacked, transported efficiently over long distances, and transferred from one mode of transport to another—container ships, rail transport flatcars, and semi-trailer trucks—without being opened. The handling system is completely mechanized so that all handling is done with cranes and special forklift trucks. All containers are numbered and tracked using computerized systems.

Containerization originated several centuries ago but was not well developed or widely applied until after World War II, when it dramatically reduced the costs of transport, supported the post-war boom in international trade, and was a major element in globalization. Containerization did away with the manual sorting of most shipments and the need for warehousing. It displaced many thousands of dock workers who formerly handled break bulk cargo. Containerization also reduced congestion in ports, significantly shortened shipping time and reduced losses from damage and theft.Containers can be made of weathering steel to minimize maintenance needs.

ISO 6346

ISO 6346 is an international standard covering the coding, identification and marking of intermodal (shipping) containers used within containerized intermodal freight transport. The standard establishes a visual identification system for every container that includes a unique serial number (with check digit), the owner, a country code, a size, type and equipment category as well as any operational marks. The standard is managed by the International Container Bureau (BIC).

Intermodal container

An intermodal container is a large standardized shipping container, designed and built for intermodal freight transport, meaning these containers can be used across different modes of transport – from ship to rail to truck – without unloading and reloading their cargo. Intermodal containers are primarily used to store and transport materials and products efficiently and securely in the global containerized intermodal freight transport system, but smaller numbers are in regional use as well. These containers are known under a number of names, such as simply container, cargo or freight container, ISO container, shipping, sea or ocean container, container van or (Conex) box, sea can or c can.Intermodal containers exist in many types and a number of standardized sizes, but ninety percent of the global container fleet are so-called "dry freight" or "general purpose" containers, durable closed steel boxes, mostly of either twenty or forty feet (6.1 or 12.2 m) standard length. The common heights are 8 feet 6 inches (2.6 m) and 9 feet 6 inches (2.9 m) – the latter are known as High Cube or Hi-Cube containers.Just like cardboard boxes and pallets, these containers are a means to bundle cargo and goods into larger, unitized loads, that can be easily handled, moved, and stacked, and that will pack tightly in a ship or yard. Intermodal containers share a number of key construction features to withstand the stresses of intermodal shipping, to facilitate their handling and to allow stacking, as well as being identifiable through their individual, unique ISO 6346 reporting mark.

In 2012, there were about 20.5 million intermodal containers in the world of varying types to suit different cargoes. Containers have largely supplanted the traditional break bulk cargo – in 2010 containers accounted for 60% of the world's seaborne trade. The predominant alternative methods of transport carry bulk cargo – whether gaseous, liquid or solid – e.g. by bulk carrier or tank ship, tank car or truck. For air freight, the more light-weight IATA-defined unit load device is used.

List of International Organization for Standardization standards, 1-4999

This is a list of published International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards and other deliverables. For a complete and up-to-date list of all the ISO standards, see the ISO catalogue.The standards are protected by copyright and most of them must be purchased. However, about 300 of the standards produced by ISO and IEC's Joint Technical Committee 1 (JTC1) have been made freely and publicly available.

ISO standards by standard number
1–9999
10000–19999
20000+

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