ISO 5428

ISO 5428:1984, Greek alphabet coded character set for bibliographic information interchange, is an ISO standard for an 8-bit character encoding for the modern Greek language. It contains a set of 73 graphic characters and is available through UNIMARC.[1] In practice it is now superseded by Unicode.

Character set

ISO 5428
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F
A_
160

 
`
0060
´
00B4
¨
00A8
~
007E
᾿
1FBD

1FFE
ͺ
037A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
B_
176
«
00AB
»
00BB

201D

201C
ʹ
0374
͵
0375

 

 

 

 

 
·
00B7

 

 

 
;
003B
C_
192

 
Α
0391
Β
0392

 
Γ
0393
Δ
0394
Ε
0395
Ϛ
03DA
Ϝ
03DC
Ζ
0396
Η
0397
Θ
0398
Ι
0399
Κ
039A
Λ
039B
Μ
039C
D_
208
Ν
039D
Ξ
039E
Ο
039F
Π
03A0
Ϙ
03D8
Ρ
03A1
Σ
03A2

 
Τ
03A4
Υ
03A5
Φ
03A6
Χ
03A7
Ψ
03A8
Ω
03A9
Ϡ
03E0

 
E_
224

 
α
03B1
β
03B2
ϐ
03D0
γ
03B3
δ
03B4
ε
03B5
ϛ
03DB
ϝ
03DD
ζ
03B6
η
03B7
θ
03B8
ι
03B9
κ
03BA
λ
03BB
μ
03BC
F_
240
ν
03BD
ο
03BE
ξ
03BF
π
03C0
ϙ
03D9
ρ
03C1
σ
03C2
ς
03C3
τ
03C4
υ
03C5
φ
03C6
χ
03C7
ψ
03C8
ω
03C9
ϡ
03E1

 

See also

Notes

  1. ^ IFLA Universal Bibliographic Control and International MARC Core Programme (UBCIM), UNIMARC / Authorities 1991

References

ISO/IEC 8859-7

ISO/IEC 8859-7:2003, Information technology — 8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets — Part 7: Latin/Greek alphabet, is part of the ISO/IEC 8859 series of ASCII-based standard character encodings, first edition published in 1987. It is informally referred to as Latin/Greek. It was designed to cover the modern Greek language. The original 1987 version of the standard had the same character assignments as the Greek national standard ELOT 928, published in 1986. The table in this article shows the updated 2003 version which adds three characters (0xA4: euro sign U+20AC, 0xA5: drachma sign U+20AF, 0xAA: Greek Ypogegrammeni U+037A). Microsoft has assigned code page 28597 a.k.a. Windows-28597 to ISO-8859-7 in Windows. IBM has assigned code page 813 to ISO 8859-7.

ISO-8859-7 is the IANA preferred charset name for this standard (formally the 1987 version, but in practice there is no problem using it for the current version, as the changes are pure additions to previously unassigned codes) when supplemented with the C0 and C1 control codes from ISO/IEC 6429.

Unicode is preferred to ISO 8859-7 or other Greek encodings in modern applications, especially on the Internet; meaning the dominant UTF-8 encoding for web pages (see also Greek alphabet in Unicode, for complete coverage, including for Ancient Greek Musical Notation, unlike for e.g. ISO 8859-7 and Windows-1253 that don't cover extras).

List of International Organization for Standardization standards, 5000-7999

This is a list of published International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards and other deliverables. For a complete and up-to-date list of all the ISO standards, see the ISO catalogue.The standards are protected by copyright and most of them must be purchased. However, about 300 of the standards produced by ISO and IEC's Joint Technical Committee 1 (JTC1) have been made freely and publicly available.

Sampi

Sampi (modern: ϡ; ancient shapes: , ) is an archaic letter of the Greek alphabet. It was used as an addition to the classical 24-letter alphabet in some eastern Ionic dialects of ancient Greek in the 6th and 5th centuries BC, to denote some type of a sibilant sound, probably [ss] or [ts], and was abandoned when the sound disappeared from Greek.

It later remained in use as a numeral symbol for 900 in the alphabetic ("Milesian") system of Greek numerals. Its modern shape, which resembles a π inclining to the right with a longish curved cross-stroke, developed during its use as a numeric symbol in minuscule handwriting of the Byzantine era.

Its current name, sampi, originally probably meant "san pi", i.e. "like a pi", and is also of medieval origin. The letter's original name in antiquity is not known. It has been proposed that sampi was a continuation of the archaic letter san, which was originally shaped like an M and denoted the sound [s] in some other dialects. Besides san, names that have been proposed for sampi include parakyisma and angma, while other historically attested terms for it are enacosis, sincope, and o charaktir.

Windows-1253

Windows-1253 is a Windows code page used to write modern Greek. It is not capable of supporting the older polytonic Greek. It is not fully compatible with ISO 8859-7 because the letters like Ά are located at different byte values.

Unicode is preferred to ISO 8859-7 or other Greek encodings in modern applications, especially on the Internet; meaning the dominant UTF-8 encoding for web pages (see also Greek alphabet in Unicode, for complete coverage, including for Ancient Greek Musical Notation, unlike for e.g. ISO 8859-7 and Windows-1253 that don't cover extras).

Early telecommunications
ISO/IEC 8859
Bibliographic use
National standards
EUC
ISO/IEC 2022
MacOS code pages("scripts")
DOS code pages
IBM AIX code pages
IBM Apple MacIntoshemulations
IBM Adobe emulations
IBM DEC emulations
IBM HP emulations
Windows code pages
EBCDIC code pages
Platform specific
Unicode / ISO/IEC 10646
TeX typesetting system
Miscellaneous code pages
Related topics
ISO standards by standard number
1–9999
10000–19999
20000+

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