ISO 3977

ISO 3977 is an international standard related to the design and procurement of gas turbine system applications. ISO 3977 is based primarily on the ASME 133 series on gas turbines, as well as the API 616 and API 11PGT standards. The standard environmental design point of any gas turbine system is 15 °C, 60% relative humidity, and sea level elevation. The standard is divided into eight parts and covers procurement, design requirements, installation, and reliability.

Parts

  • ISO 3977-1:1997 Part 1: General introduction and definitions
  • ISO 3977-2:1997 Part 2: Standard reference conditions and ratings
  • ISO 3977-3:2004 Part 3: Design requirements
  • ISO 3977-4:2002 Part 4: Fuels and environment
  • ISO 3977-5:2001 Part 5: Applications for petroleum and natural gas industries
  • ISO 3977-7:2002 Part 7: Technical information
  • ISO 3977-8:2002 Part 8: Inspection, testing, installation and commissioning
  • ISO 3977-9:1999 Part 9: Reliability, availability, maintainability and safety

External links

List of International Organization for Standardization standards, 1-4999

This is a list of published International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards and other deliverables. For a complete and up-to-date list of all the ISO standards, see the ISO catalogue.The standards are protected by copyright and most of them must be purchased. However, about 300 of the standards produced by ISO and IEC's Joint Technical Committee 1 (JTC1) have been made freely and publicly available.

Standard conditions for temperature and pressure

Standard conditions for temperature and pressure are standard sets of conditions for experimental measurements to be established to allow comparisons to be made between different sets of data. The most used standards are those of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), although these are not universally accepted standards. Other organizations have established a variety of alternative definitions for their standard reference conditions.

In chemistry, IUPAC changed the definition of standard temperature and pressure (STP) in 1982:

Until 1982, STP was defined as a temperature of 273.15 K (0 °C, 32 °F) and an absolute pressure of exactly 1 atm (101.325 kPa).

Since 1982, STP is defined as a temperature of 273.15 K (0 °C, 32 °F) and an absolute pressure of exactly 105 Pa (100 kPa, 1 bar).STP should not be confused with the standard state commonly used in thermodynamic evaluations of the Gibbs energy of a reaction.

NIST uses a temperature of 20 °C (293.15 K, 68 °F) and an absolute pressure of 1 atm (14.696 psi, 101.325 kPa). This standard is also called normal temperature and pressure (abbreviated as NTP).

The International Standard Metric Conditions for natural gas and similar fluids are 288.15 K (15.00 °C; 59.00 °F) and 101.325 kPa.In industry and commerce, standard conditions for temperature and pressure are often necessary to define the standard reference conditions to express the volumes of gases and liquids and related quantities such as the rate of volumetric flow (the volumes of gases vary significantly with temperature and pressure) – standard cubic meters per second (sm3/s), and normal cubic meters per second (nm3/s). However, many technical publications (books, journals, advertisements for equipment and machinery) simply state "standard conditions" without specifying them, often leading to confusion and errors. Good practice always incorporates the reference conditions of temperature and pressure.

ISO standards by standard number
1–9999
10000–19999
20000+

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