ISO/IEC 27001

ISO/IEC 27001 is an information security standard, part of the ISO/IEC 27000 family of standards, of which the last version was published in 2013, with a few minor updates since then.[1] It is published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) under the joint ISO and IEC subcommittee, ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27.[2]

ISO/IEC 27001 specifies a management system that is intended to bring information security under management control and gives specific requirements. Organizations that meet the requirements may be certified by an accredited certification body following successful completion of an audit.

How the standard works

Most organizations have a number of information security controls. However, without an information security management system (ISMS), controls tend to be somewhat disorganized and disjointed, having been implemented often as point solutions to specific situations or simply as a matter of convention. Security controls in operation typically address certain aspects of IT or data security specifically; leaving non-IT information assets (such as paperwork and proprietary knowledge) less protected on the whole. Moreover, business continuity planning and physical security may be managed quite independently of IT or information security while Human Resources practices may make little reference to the need to define and assign information security roles and responsibilities throughout the organization.

ISO/IEC 27001 requires that management:

  • Systematically examine the organization's information security risks, taking account of the threats, vulnerabilities, and impacts;
  • Design and implement a coherent and comprehensive suite of information security controls and/or other forms of risk treatment (such as risk avoidance or risk transfer) to address those risks that are deemed unacceptable; and
  • Adopt an overarching management process to ensure that the information security controls continue to meet the organization's information security needs on an ongoing basis.

Note that ISO/IEC 27001 is designed to cover much more than just IT.

What controls will be tested as part of certification to ISO/IEC 27001 is dependent on the certification auditor. This can include any controls that the organisation has deemed to be within the scope of the ISMS and this testing can be to any depth or extent as assessed by the auditor as needed to test that the control has been implemented and is operating effectively.

Management determines the scope of the ISMS for certification purposes and may limit it to, say, a single business unit or location. The ISO/IEC 27001 certificate does not necessarily mean the remainder of the organization, outside the scoped area, has an adequate approach to information security management.

Other standards in the ISO/IEC 27000 family of standards provide additional guidance on certain aspects of designing, implementing and operating an ISMS, for example on information security risk management (ISO/IEC 27005).

The PDCA Cycle

PDCA Cycle
The PDCA cycle[3]

The 2002 version of BS 7799-2 introduced the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) cycle aligning it with quality standards such as ISO 9000. 27001:2005 applied this to all the processes in ISMS.

Plan (establishing the ISMS)
Establish the policy, the ISMS objectives, processes and procedures related to risk management and the improvement of information security to provide results in line with the global policies and objectives of the organization.
Do (implementing and workings of the ISMS)
Implement and exploit the ISMS policy, controls, processes and procedures.
Check (monitoring and review of the ISMS)
Assess and, if applicable, measure the performances of the processes against the policy, objectives and practical experience and report results to management for review.
Act (update and improvement of the ISMS)
Undertake corrective and preventive actions, on the basis of the results of the ISMS internal audit and management review, or other relevant information to continually improve the said system.

All references to PDCA were removed in ISO/IEC 27001:2013. Its use in the context of ISO/IEC 27001 is no longer mandatory.

History of ISO/IEC 27001

BS 7799 was a standard originally published by BSI Group[4] in 1995. It was written by the United Kingdom Government's Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), and consisted of several parts.

The first part, containing the best practices for information security management, was revised in 1998; after a lengthy discussion in the worldwide standards bodies, it was eventually adopted by ISO as ISO/IEC 17799, "Information Technology - Code of practice for information security management." in 2000. ISO/IEC 17799 was then revised in June 2005 and finally incorporated in the ISO 27000 series of standards as ISO/IEC 27002 in July 2007.

The second part of BS7799 was first published by BSI in 1999, known as BS 7799 Part 2, titled "Information Security Management Systems - Specification with guidance for use." BS 7799-2 focused on how to implement an Information security management system (ISMS), referring to the information security management structure and controls identified in BS 7799-2. This later became ISO/IEC 27001:2005. BS 7799 Part 2 was adopted by ISO as ISO/IEC 27001 in November 2005.

BS 7799 Part 3 was published in 2005, covering risk analysis and management. It aligns with ISO/IEC 27001:2005.

Very little reference or use is made to any of the BS standards in connection with ISO/IEC 27001.

Certification

An ISMS may be certified compliant with ISO/IEC 27001 by a number of Accredited Registrars worldwide. Certification against any of the recognized national variants of ISO/IEC 27001 (e.g. JIS Q 27001, the Japanese version) by an accredited certification body is functionally equivalent to certification against ISO/IEC 27001 itself.

In some countries, the bodies that verify conformity of management systems to specified standards are called "certification bodies", while in others they are commonly referred to as "registration bodies", "assessment and registration bodies", "certification/ registration bodies", and sometimes "registrars".

The ISO/IEC 27001 certification,[5] like other ISO management system certifications, usually involves a three-stage external audit process defined by the ISO/IEC 17021[6] and ISO/IEC 27006[7] standards:

  • Stage 1 is a preliminary, informal review of the ISMS, for example checking the existence and completeness of key documentation such as the organization's information security policy, Statement of Applicability (SoA) and Risk Treatment Plan (RTP). This stage serves to familiarize the auditors with the organization and vice versa.
  • Stage 2 is a more detailed and formal compliance audit, independently testing the ISMS against the requirements specified in ISO/IEC 27001. The auditors will seek evidence to confirm that the management system has been properly designed and implemented, and is in fact in operation (for example by confirming that a security committee or similar management body meets regularly to oversee the ISMS). Certification audits are usually conducted by ISO/IEC 27001 Lead Auditors. Passing this stage results in the ISMS being certified compliant with ISO/IEC 27001.
  • Ongoing involves follow-up reviews or audits to confirm that the organization remains in compliance with the standard. Certification maintenance requires periodic re-assessment audits to confirm that the ISMS continues to operate as specified and intended. These should happen at least annually but (by agreement with management) are often conducted more frequently, particularly while the ISMS is still maturing.

ISO/IEC 27001:2005 Domains

Note that the 2005 version of ISO/IEC 27001 is obsolete and no longer in use.

A.5 Security Policy

A.6 Organisation of information Security

A.7 Asset Management

A.8 Human Resources

A.9 Physical and environmental security

A.10 Communications and operations management

A.11 Access Control

A.12 Information systems acquisition, development and maintenance

A.13 Information security incident management

A.14 Business continuity management

A.15 Compliance

Structure of the standard

The official title of the standard is "Information technology — Security techniques — Information security management systems — Requirements"

ISO/IEC 27001:2013 has ten short clauses, plus a long annex, which cover:

1. Scope of the standard
2. How the document is referenced
3. Reuse of the terms and definitions in ISO/IEC 27000
4. Organizational context and stakeholders
5. Information security leadership and high-level support for policy
6. Planning an information security management system; risk assessment; risk treatment
7. Supporting an information security management system
8. Making an information security management system operational
9. Reviewing the system's performance
10. Corrective action
Annex A: List of controls and their objectives

This structure mirrors other management standards such as ISO 22301 (business continuity management) and this helps organizations comply with multiple management systems standards if they wish. Annexes B and C of 27001:2005 have been removed.

Changes from the 2005 standard

The 2013 standard has a completely different structure than the 2005 standard which had five clauses. The 2013 standard puts more emphasis on measuring and evaluating how well an organization's ISMS is performing,[8] and there is a new section on outsourcing, which reflects the fact that many organizations rely on third parties to provide some aspects of IT. It does not emphasize the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle that 27001:2005 did. Other continuous improvement processes like Six Sigma's DMAIC method can be implemented.[9] More attention is paid to the organizational context of information security, and risk assessment has changed.[10] Overall, 27001:2013 is designed to fit better alongside other management standards such as ISO 9000 and ISO/IEC 20000, and it has more in common with them.[11]

New controls:

A.6.1.5 Information security in project management
A.12.6.2 Restrictions on software installation
A.14.2.1 Secure development policy
A.14.2.5 Secure system engineering principles
A.14.2.6 Secure development environment
A.14.2.8 System security testing
A.15.1.1 Information security policy for supplier relationships
A.15.1.3 Information and communication technology supply chain
A.16.1.4 Assessment of and decision on information security events
A.16.1.5 Response to information security incidents
A.17.2.1 Availability of information processing facilities

Controls

Clause 6.1.3 describes how an organization can respond to risks with a risk treatment plan; an important part of this is choosing appropriate controls. A very important change in the new version of ISO/IEC 27001 is that there is now no requirement to use the Annex A controls to manage the information security risks. The previous version insisted ("shall") that controls identified in the risk assessment to manage the risks must have been selected from Annex A. Thus almost every risk assessment ever completed under the old version of ISO/IEC 27001 used Annex A controls but an increasing number of risk assessments in the new version do not use Annex A as the control set. This enables the risk assessment to be simpler and much more meaningful to the organization and helps considerably with establishing a proper sense of ownership of both the risks and controls. This is the main reason for this change in the new version.

There are now 114 controls in 14 clauses and 35 control categories; the 2005 standard had 133 controls in 11 groups.

A.5: Information security policies (2 controls)
A.6: Organization of information security (7 controls)
A.7: Human resource security - 6 controls that are applied before, during, or after employment
A.8: Asset management (10 controls)
A.9: Access control (14 controls)
A.10: Cryptography (2 controls)
A.11: Physical and environmental security (15 controls)
A.12: Operations security (14 controls)
A.13: Communications security (7 controls)
A.14: System acquisition, development and maintenance (13 controls)
A.15: Supplier relationships (5 controls)
A.16: Information security incident management (7 controls)
A.17: Information security aspects of business continuity management (4 controls)
A.18: Compliance; with internal requirements, such as policies, and with external requirements, such as laws (8 controls)

The new and updated controls reflect changes to technology affecting many organizations - for instance, cloud computing - but as stated above it is possible to use and be certified to ISO/IEC 27001:2013 and not use any of these controls.

See also

References

  1. ^ "BS EN ISO/IEC 27001:2017 – what has changed?". www.bsigroup.com. BSI Group. Retrieved 29 March 2018.
  2. ^ "ISO - ISO Standards - ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27 - IT Security techniques". International Organization for Standardization. Retrieved 20 May 2017.
  3. ^ "Taking the First Step with PDCA". 2 February 2009. Retrieved 17 March 2011.
  4. ^ "Facts and figures". bsigroup.com.
  5. ^ The ISO/IEC 27001 Certification Process.
  6. ^ ISO/IEC 17021.
  7. ^ ISO/IEC 27006.
  8. ^ Herbert, Chantall (3 June 2014). "More changes ahead…..ISO 27001:2005 Information Security Management Standard". QSL. Retrieved 20 May 2017.
  9. ^ "Update to ISO 27001 Planned for 2013". Dionach. 25 January 2011. Retrieved 20 May 2017.
  10. ^ "BS ISO/IEC DIS 27001 (Draft ISO27001 2013)". IT Governance. Archived from the original on 1 May 2013. Retrieved 20 May 2017.
  11. ^ Mackie, Ryan (2 April 2013). "ISO 27001:2013 – Understanding the New Standard". The Pragmatic Auditor. Retrieved 20 May 2017.

External links

BS 7799

BS 7799 was a standard originally published by BSI Group (BSI) in 1995. It was written by the United Kingdom Government's Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), and consisted of several parts.

The first part, containing the best practices for Information Security Management, was revised in 1998; after a lengthy discussion in the worldwide standards bodies, was eventually adopted by ISO as ISO/IEC 17799, "Information Technology - Code of practice for information security management." in 2000. ISO/IEC 17799 was then revised in June 2005 and finally incorporated in the ISO 27000 series of standards as ISO/IEC 27002 in July 2007.

The second part to BS 7799 was first published by BSI in 1999, known as BS 7799 Part 2, titled "Information Security Management Systems - Specification with guidance for use." BS 7799-2 focused on how to implement an information security management system (ISMS), referring to the information security management structure and controls identified in BS 7799-2, which later became ISO/IEC 27001. The 2002 version of BS 7799-2 introduced the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) (Deming quality assurance model), aligning it with quality standards such as ISO 9000. BS 7799 Part 2 was adopted by ISO as ISO/IEC 27001 in November 2005.

BS 7799 Part 3 was published in 2005, covering risk analysis and management. It aligns with ISO/IEC 27001.

Cadcorp

Computer Aided Development Corporation Ltd. (Cadcorp) is a British owned and run company established in 1991. Cadcorp has its headquarters in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, U.K.. Cadcorp has a network of distributors and value added resellers (VARs) around the world.Cadcorp is an ISO 9001:2000 and ISO/IEC 27001:2005 certified company, a Microsoft SQL Server Spatial Partner, an Ordnance Survey Licensed Developer Partner, and a corporate member of the Association for Geographic Information (AGI) in the U.K..

Chief information security officer

A chief information security officer (CISO) is the senior-level executive within an organization responsible for establishing and maintaining the enterprise vision, strategy, and program to ensure information assets and technologies are adequately protected. The CISO directs staff in identifying, developing, implementing, and maintaining processes across the enterprise to reduce information and information technology (IT) risks. They respond to incidents, establish appropriate standards and controls, manage security technologies, and direct the establishment and implementation of policies and procedures. The CISO is also usually responsible for information-related compliance (e.g. supervises the implementation to achieve ISO/IEC 27001 certification for an entity, or a part of it).

Typically, the CISO's influence reaches the entire organization. Responsibilities may include, but not be limited to:

Computer emergency response team/computer security incident response team

Cybersecurity

Disaster recovery and business continuity management

Identity and access management

Information privacy

Information regulatory compliance (e.g., US PCI DSS, FISMA, GLBA, HIPAA; UK Data Protection Act 1998; Canada PIPEDA, Europe GDPR)

Information risk management

Information security and information assurance

Information security operations center (ISOC)

Information technology controls for financial and other systems

IT investigations, digital forensics, eDiscoveryHaving a CISO or the equivalent function in the organization has become a standard in business, government, and non-profit sectors. Throughout the world, a growing number of organizations have a CISO. By 2009, approximately 85% of large organizations had a security executive, up from 56% in 2008, and 43% in 2006. In 2011, in a survey by PricewaterhouseCoopers for their Annual Information Security Survey, 80% of businesses had a CISO or equivalent. About one-third of these security chiefs report to a Chief Information Officer (CIO), 35% to Chief Executive Officer (CEO), and 28% to the board of directors.

In corporations, the trend is for CISOs to have a strong balance of business acumen and technology knowledge. CISOs are often in high demand and compensation is comparable to other C-level positions who also hold a similar corporate title.

Independent organizations such as Holistic Information Security Practitioner Institute (HISPI) and EC-Council provide training, education and certification by promoting a holistic approach to Cybersecurity to Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs), Information Security Officers (ISOs), Information Security Managers, Directors of Information Security, Security Analysts, Security Engineers and Technology Risk Managers from major corporations and organizations.

Cyber security standards

Cybersecurity standards (also styled cyber security standards) are techniques generally set forth in published materials that attempt to protect the cyber environment of a user or organization. This environment includes users themselves, networks, devices, all software, processes,

information in storage or transit, applications, services, and systems that can be connected directly or indirectly to networks. The principal objective is to reduce the risks, including prevention or mitigation of cyber-attacks. These published materials consist of collections of tools, policies, security concepts, security safeguards, guidelines, risk management approaches, actions, training, best practices, assurance and technologies.

ECOGRA

eCOGRA (eCommerce Online Gaming Regulation and Assurance) is a London-based internationally approved testing agency, accredited certification body and player protection and standards organisation. The company was established in 2003 in the United Kingdom and introduced the first formal self-regulation program to the online gambling industry in 2003. eCOGRA is also a leading independent and internationally approved testing agency and certification body, specializing in the certification of online gaming software and the audit of Information Security Management Systems.

The organisation has been awarded the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) ISO approval ISO/IEC17025:2005 : General Requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories for the United Kingdom and Denmark, and ISO approval ISO/IEC 17021-1:2015 – Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of management systems.

Faculty of Organisation Studies in Novo Mesto

The Faculty of Organisation Studies in Novo Mesto (FOS; Slovene: Fakulteta za organizacijske študije v Novem mestu) is an independent (private) faculty, in Novo Mesto, Slovenia. The Faculty of Organisation Studies in Novo Mesto holds ISO standards ISO 9001 and ISO/IEC 27001. The current dean is Boris Bukovec.

IASME

IASME is an Information Assurance standard that is designed to be simple and affordable to help improve the cyber security of Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

The IASME Governance controls are aligned with the Cyber Essentials scheme and certification to the IASME standard usually includes certification to Cyber Essentials. The standard was developed in 2010 and has proven to be very effective at improving the security of supply chains for large organisations.

ISO/IEC 20000

ISO/IEC 20000 is the first international standard for IT service management. It was developed in 2005 by ISO/IEC JTC1/SC7 and revised in 2011 and 2018. It was originally based on the earlier BS 15000 that was developed by BSI Group.ISO/IEC 20000, like its BS 15000 predecessor, was originally developed to reflect best practice guidance contained within the ITIL (Information Technology Infrastructure Library) framework (reference needed), although it equally supports other IT service management frameworks and approaches including Microsoft Operations Framework and components of ISACA's COBIT framework. The differentiation between ISO/IEC 20000 and BS 15000 has been addressed by Jenny Dugmore.The standard was first published in December 2005. In June 2011, the ISO/IEC 20000-1:2005 was updated to ISO/IEC 20000-1:2011. In February 2012, ISO/IEC 20000-2:2005 was updated to ISO/IEC 20000-2:2012.

ISO 20000-1 has now been revised by ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 40 IT Service Management and IT Governance. The revision has been released in July 2018. From that point certified entities enter a three year transition period to update to the new version of ISO 20000-1.

ISO/IEC 27001 Lead Auditor

The ISO/IEC 27001 Lead Auditor certification consists of a professional certification for auditors specializing in information security management systems (ISMS) based on the ISO/IEC 27001 standard and ISO/IEC 19011.

The training of lead auditors normally includes a classroom and exam portion and a requirement to have performed a number of ISO/IEC 27001 audits and a number of years of Information Security experience. The training course is provided by any organisation wishing to deliver the training. Some ISO27001 Lead Auditor training courses are formally accredited by training accreditation bodies such as IRCA and PECB. Attending the course and passing the exam is not sufficient for an individual to use the credentials of Lead Auditor as professional and audit experience is required. The specific requirements to obtain a certificate stating the qualification of "ISO27001 Lead Auditor" vary depending on the organisation issuing the certificate.

The course usually consists of around forty hours (four days) of training and a final exam on the fifth day. This certification is different from the ISO/IEC 27001 Lead Implementer certification which is targeted for information security professionals who want to implement the ISO/IEC 27001 standard rather than audit it. Most of the 5 day ISO27001 Lead Auditor courses require some prerequisite knowledge of ISO27001 but the content of the courses vary considerably.

If an individual wants to issue an ISO/IEC 27001 certificate of compliance then the audit must be done by a Lead Auditor working for an accredited certification body and done using all the rules of that certification body, which will need to adhere to ISO17021 and ISO27006.

The main benefit from achieving the ISO/IEC 27001 Lead Auditor certification is the recognition that the individual has some skills in the topic.

The main ISO/IEC 27001 auditor certifications normally follow these designations:

Provisional ISMS Auditor

ISMS Auditor/Internal Auditor

Lead ISMS Auditor

ISO/IEC 27001 Lead Implementer

ISO 27001 Lead Implementer is a professional certification for professionals specializing in information security management systems (ISMS) based on the ISO/IEC 27001 standard. This professional certification is intended for information security professionals wanting to understand the steps required to implement the ISO 27001 standard (as opposed to the ISO 27001 Lead Auditor certification which is intended for an auditor wanting to audit and certify a system to the ISO 27001 standard).

This certification is provided by numerous organizations. Some are currently not certified by any personnel certification body while others are certified by accredited certification bodies. Certified ISO 27001 implementation courses should be accredited to the ISO/IEC 17024 standard.

ISO/IEC 27006

ISO/IEC 27006 is an information security standard published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Part of the ISO/IEC 27000 series of ISO/IEC Information Security Management System (ISMS) standards, it is titled Information technology - Security techniques - Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of information security management systems.

ISO/IEC 27006 lays out formal requirements for accredited organizations which certify other organizations compliant with ISO/IEC 27001.

It effectively replaces EA 7/03 (Guidelines for the Accreditation of bodies operating certification/ registration of. Information Security Management Systems).

The standard helps ensure that ISO/IEC 27001 certificates issued by accredited organizations are meaningful and trustworthy, in other words it is a matter of assurance.

ISO/IEC 27552

ISO/IEC 27552 is a privacy extension to ISO/IEC 27001. The design goal is to enhance the existing Information Security Management System (ISMS) with additional requirements in order to establish, implement, maintain, and continually improve a Privacy Information Management System (PIMS). The draft standard outlines a framework for Personally Identifiable Information (PII) Controllers and PII Processors to manage privacy controls to reduce the risk to the privacy rights of individuals.While the standard is currently still in draft, ISO/IEC 27552 is intended to be a certifiable extension to ISO/IEC 27001 certifications. In other words, organizations planning to seek an ISO/IEC 27552 certification will also need to an ISO/IEC 27001 certification.

ITIL security management

ITIL security management (originally Information Technology Infrastructure Library) describes the structured fitting of security into an organization. ITIL security management is based on the ISO 27001 standard. "ISO/IEC 27001:2005 covers all types of organizations (e.g. commercial enterprises, government agencies, not-for profit organizations). ISO/IEC 27001:2005 specifies the requirements for establishing, implementing, operating, monitoring, reviewing, maintaining and improving a documented Information Security Management System within the context of the organization's overall business risks. It specifies requirements for the implementation of security controls customized to the needs of individual organizations or parts thereof. ISO/IEC 27001:2005 is designed to ensure the selection of adequate and proportionate security controls that protect information assets and give confidence to interested parties."

A basic concept of security management is information security. The primary goal of information security is to control access to information. The value of the information is what must be protected. These values include confidentiality, integrity and availability. Inferred aspects are privacy, anonymity and verifiability.

The goal of security management comes in two parts:

Security requirements defined in service level agreements (SLA) and other external requirements that are specified in underpinning contracts, legislation and possible internal or external imposed policies.

Basic security that guarantees management continuity. This is necessary to achieve simplified service-level management for information security.SLAs define security requirements, along with legislation (if applicable) and other contracts. These requirements can act as key performance indicators (KPIs) that can be used for process management and for interpreting the results of the security management process.

The security management process relates to other ITIL-processes. However, in this particular section the most obvious relations are the relations to the service level management, incident management and change management processes.

IT baseline protection

The IT baseline protection (in German IT-Grundschutz) approach from the German Federal Office for Information Security (FSI) is a methodology to identify and implement computer security measures in an organization. The aim is the achievement of an adequate and appropriate level of security for IT systems. To reach this goal the FSI recommends "well-proven technical, organizational, personnel, and infrastructural safeguards". Organizations and federal agencies show their systematic approach to secure their IT systems (e.g. Information Security Management System) by obtaining an ISO/IEC 27001 Certificate on the basis of IT-Grundschutz.

Information security management

Information security management (ISM) describes controls that an organization needs to implement to ensure that it is sensibly protecting the confidentiality, availability, and integrity of assets from threats and vulnerabilities. By extension, ISM includes information risk management, a process which involves the assessment of the risks an organization must deal with in the management and protection of assets, as well as the dissemination of the risks to all appropriate stakeholders. This of course requires proper asset identification and valuation steps, including evaluating the value of confidentiality, integrity, availability, and replacement of assets. As part of information security management, an organization may implement an information security management system and other best practices found in the ISO/IEC 27001, ISO/IEC 27002, and ISO/IEC 27035 standards on information security.

MEHARI

MEHARI (MEthod for Harmonized Analysis of RIsk) is a free, open-source information risk analysis assessment and risk management method, for the use of information security professionals.

MEHARI enables business managers, information security/risk management professionals and other stakeholders to evaluate and manage the organization's risks relating to information, information systems and information processes (not just IT). It is designed to align with and support information security risk management according to ISO/IEC 27005, particularly in the context of an ISO/IEC 27001-compliant Information Security Management System (ISMS) or a similar overarching security management or governance framework.

Telehouse Europe

Established in 1988, Telehouse is a major carrier-neutral colocation, ICT solutions and managed services provider based in Docklands, London. It operates eight facilities spread between London, Paris and Frankfurt. Part of the global Telehouse network of data centres, the brand has 45 colocation facilities in 26 major cities around the world including Moscow, Istanbul, Johannesburg, Cape Town, Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Singapore, Vietnam, Seoul, Tokyo, New York and Los Angeles. KDDI, Telehouse's Japanese telecommunications and systems integration parent company, operates data centre facilities in America and Asia. Telehouse has ISO/IEC 27001:2005 (information security) and ISO 9001:2000 (quality management) and ISO 14001:2004 (environmental management) accreditations across many of its sites in Europe.

Universidade Aberta

Universidade Aberta (UAb) is a public distance education university in Portugal. Established in 1988, UAb offers higher education (Undergraduate, Master and Doctorate degrees) and Lifelong Learning study programs. Since 2008 that all programs are taught in elearning mode, the year that UAb became a European institution of reference in the area of advanced elearning and online learning through the recognition of its exclusive Virtual Pedagogical Model.

In 2010, UAb was awarded the Prize EFQUEL by the European Foundation for Quality in Elearning and certified with the UNIQUe Quality Label for the use of ICT in Higher Education (Universities and Institutes). In the same year, UAb was also qualified by an international panel of independent experts as the reference institution for teaching in elearning system in Portugal.

Within the European levels of excellence framework, the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) distinguished UAb with the 1st Level of Excellence Committed to Excellence (C2E) in 2011. In 2016, UAb’s commitment to quality has been recognized again by EFQM that distinguished the University with 4 Stars in the 2nd Level of Excellence Recognized for Excellence (R4E).

The information security of the learning platform of Universidade Aberta has been certified by the Portuguese Association of Certification (APCER) with the ISO/IEC 27001 in 2017.

Universiti Malaysia Sarawak

Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS; English: University of Malaysia, Sarawak) is a Malaysian public university located in Kota Samarahan, Sarawak. UNIMAS was officially incorporated on 24 December 1992. Recently, UNIMAS has been ranked among top 200th in Asian University Rankings 2017 by QS World University Rankings.The University took in its first students numbering 118 in 1993 with the opening of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Resource Science and Technology. These students were temporarily located at Telekom Training College, Simpang Tiga, Kuching until 1994 when the University moved to its East Campus in Kota Samarahan, Sarawak. The University’s East Campus at Kota Samarahan was officially launched by the Prime Minister, YAB Dato’ Seri Dr. Mahathir Mohamad on Independence Day, 31 August 1993.

At present, the University consists of 50 Faculties, three Institutes and 60 Centres. The Faculty of Language and Communication is the latest faculty formed recently.

UNIMAS was awarded MS ISO 9001: 2008 quality certificate by SIRIM QAS International Sdn. Bhd. and IQNet on 13 May 2010 for its core management process at Undergraduate Studies vision (BPPs) and Centre for Academic Information Services (CAIS).UNIMAS has implemented and maintains an Information Security Management System(ISMS) which fulfills the requirement of ISO/IEC 27001:2005 and MS ISO/IEC 27001:2007 standards. The scope covers the areas for the management of UNIMAS Data Centre covering equipment, system software, database and operating systems for the university's critical applications. The certification was issued to UNIMAS on 27 September 2013.

An international competition was held for the masterplan design of the West Campus. The winning design was by Peter Verity (PDRc) the international architect, who after detailed environmental analysis chose the site for the West Campus. The objective of the plan was to create an environmentally sustainable urban campus which, in the manner of Louvain-la-Neuve, would form the centre of a significant university new town. The interface between the fresh water and saltwater systems of the site are expected to give the opportunity to create a biodiversity of considerable richness.The opening of the new West Campus by Prime Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah Haji Ahmad Badawi on 18 April 2006 was witnessed by 10,000 students, staff and members of the public. The event was also broadcast live over RTM1.

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