ISO/IEC 19752

ISO/IEC 19752 Information technology — Method for the determination of toner cartridge yield for monochromatic electrophotographic printers and multi-function devices that contain printer components is an ISO standard method for the determination of toner cartridge yield for monochrome laser printers, introduced in June 2004.

Traditionally, printer manufacturers did not employ a standard, well-defined methodology for measuring toner cartridge yield. The most widely used description of cartridge capacity was "number of printed pages at 5% coverage", with final results depending on a number of factors.

In contrast, ISO/IEC 19752 strives for a comprehensive and rigorous definition of the measurement process with the purpose of creating clear and objective criteria for comparison of cartridge yields. In particular, the standard provides a detailed definition and description of:

  • Test preparations and environmental conditions
  • Sample size (at least 3 printers with 3 cartridges each)
  • Paper type
  • Print mode
  • Test document (provided in PDF format)
  • Cartridge and printer source (not supplied by manufacturer; purchased on the open market from at least three different sources)
  • Error and process handling
  • End-of-life criteria (for example, how many times the cartridges should be shaken)

See also

Sources

ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 28

ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 28 Office equipment is a standardization subcommittee of the Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), that develops and facilitates international standards, technical reports, and technical specifications within the field of office equipment and products, and systems composed of combinations of office equipment. The group’s main focus lies within the area of printers and copiers. The international secretariat of ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 28 is the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee (JISC) located in Japan.

ISO Standards for colour ink jet printers

In 2009, the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) published the International Standard for determining the ink cartridge yield for colour inkjet printers and multifunctional devices. This standard is used to prescribe the test method that manufacturers and test labs use to determine ink jet cartridge yields. It also standardizes the appropriate method of describing the yield of cartridges in documentation supplied to the consumer by the manufacturer. Manufacturers of printers or devices that use colour ink jet technology are meant to abide by this standard when testing for, and labeling the estimated yields of their products.

The testing focused on sampling yields generated from typical business consumer printing applications. The judgment of total yield was defined by fade, marked by a depletion of ink in the cartridge, or automatic stop, caused by an "Ink Out" detection function.

List of International Organization for Standardization standards, 18000-19999

This is a list of published International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards and other deliverables. For a complete and up-to-date list of all the ISO standards, see the ISO catalogue.The standards are protected by copyright and most of them must be purchased. However, about 300 of the standards produced by ISO and IEC's Joint Technical Committee 1 (JTC1) have been made freely and publicly available.

Printer (computing)

In computing, a printer is a peripheral device which makes a persistent human-readable representation of graphics or text on paper.

The first computer printer designed was a mechanically driven apparatus by Charles Babbage for his difference engine in the 19th century; however, his mechanical printer design was not built until 2000. The first electronic printer was the EP-101, invented by Japanese company Epson and released in 1968. The first commercial printers generally used mechanisms from electric typewriters and Teletype machines. The demand for higher speed led to the development of new systems specifically for computer use. In the 1980s were daisy wheel systems similar to typewriters, line printers that produced similar output but at much higher speed, and dot matrix systems that could mix text and graphics but produced relatively low-quality output. The plotter was used for those requiring high quality line art like blueprints.

The introduction of the low-cost laser printer in 1984 with the first HP LaserJet, and the addition of PostScript in next year's Apple LaserWriter, set off a revolution in printing known as desktop publishing. Laser printers using PostScript mixed text and graphics, like dot-matrix printers, but at quality levels formerly available only from commercial typesetting systems. By 1990, most simple printing tasks like fliers and brochures were now created on personal computers and then laser printed; expensive offset printing systems were being dumped as scrap. The HP Deskjet of 1988 offered the same advantages as laser printer in terms of flexibility, but produced somewhat lower quality output (depending on the paper) from much less expensive mechanisms. Inkjet systems rapidly displaced dot matrix and daisy wheel printers from the market. By the 2000s high-quality printers of this sort had fallen under the $100 price point and became commonplace.

The rapid update of internet email through the 1990s and into the 2000s has largely displaced the need for printing as a means of moving documents, and a wide variety of reliable storage systems means that a "physical backup" is of little benefit today. Even the desire for printed output for "offline reading" while on mass transit or aircraft has been displaced by e-book readers and tablet computers. Today, traditional printers are being used more for special purposes, like printing photographs or artwork, and are no longer a must-have peripheral.

Starting around 2010, 3D printing became an area of intense interest, allowing the creation of physical objects with the same sort of effort as an early laser printer required to produce a brochure. These devices are in their earliest stages of development and have not yet become commonplace.

Toner cartridge

A toner cartridge, also called laser toner, is the consumable component of a laser printer. Toner cartridges contain toner powder, a fine, dry mixture of plastic particles, carbon, and black or other coloring agents that make the actual image on the paper. The toner is transferred to paper via an electrostatically charged drum unit, and fused onto the paper by heated rollers during the printing process.

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