iPod Touch

The iPod Touch (stylized and marketed as iPod touch) is a brand of iOS-based all-purpose mobile devices designed and marketed by Apple Inc. with a touchscreen-controlled user interface. It connects to the Internet only through Wi-Fi base stations, does not use cellular network data, and is therefore not a smartphone. Similarly to an iPhone, it can be used as a music player, digital camera, web browser, note-logger, and handheld gaming device.[5] As of May 2013, 100 million iPod Touch units had been sold since 2007.[1]

iPod Touch models are sold by storage space and color, with all models of the same generation typically offering otherwise identical features, processors, and performance, in addition to available operating system upgrades; an exception was the fifth generation, as the low-end (16 GB)[6] model was initially sold without a rear-facing camera.[7] The current iPod touch is the sixth-generation model, released on July 15, 2015.

As of February 2019, the iPod Touch is currently the only product in Apple's iPod product line, following the discontinuation of the iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle on July 27, 2017. Following the discontinuation, Apple revised the storage and pricing for the iPod Touch with 32 and 128 GB of storage.[8]

iPod Touch
IPodtouchlogo
Pink iPod touch 6th generation
iPod Touch 6th generation in Pink
DeveloperApple Inc.
ManufacturerFoxconn
Product familyiPod
TypeMobile device
Release date
  • 1st gen: September 5, 2007
  • 2nd gen: September 9, 2008
  • 3rd gen: September 9, 2009
  • 4th gen: September 1, 2010
  • 5th gen: October 11, 2012
  • 6th gen: July 15, 2015
Units sold100 million (as of May 2013)[1]
Operating systemiOS
System-on-chip used
CPU
Memory
  • 1st & 2nd gen: 128 MB LPDDR DRAM
  • 3rd & 4th gen: 256 MB LPDDR DRAM
  • 5th gen: 512 MB LPDDR2 DRAM
  • 6th gen: 1 GB LPDDR3 DRAM
Storage32 & 128  GB flash memory (6th generation 2017)
Display
Graphics
Input
Connectivity
1st gen, 2nd gen, and 3rd gen:

Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g)
4th gen:
Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g/n)
5th gen:
Wi-Fi (802.11 a/b/g/n)
6th gen:
Wi-Fi (802.11 a/b/g/n/ac)

2nd gen, 3rd gen, and 4th gen:
Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
5th gen:
Bluetooth 4.0
6th gen:
Bluetooth 4.1[4]

Power
  • Built-in rechargeable Li-Po battery
  • 1st gen: 3.7 V 2.15 W·h (580 mA·h)
  • 2nd gen: 3.7 V 2.73 W·h (739 mA·h)
  • 3rd gen: 3.7 V 2.92 W·h (789 mA·h)
  • 4th gen: 3.7 V 3.44 W·h (930 mA·h)
  • 5th gen: 3.7 V 3.8 W·h (1030 mA·h)
  • 6th gen: 3.83 V 3.99 W·h (1043 mA·h)
Online servicesApp Store, iTunes Store, Game Center, iBookstore, iCloud, Passbook
Dimensions
  • 1st gen:
  • 110 mm (4.3 in) H
  • 61.8 mm (2.43 in) W
  • 8 mm (0.31 in) D
  • 2nd, 3rd gen:
  • 110 mm (4.3 in) H
  • 61.8 mm (2.43 in) W
  • 8.5 mm (0.33 in) D
  • 4th gen:
  • 111 mm (4.4 in) H
  • 58.9 mm (2.32 in) W
  • 7.2 mm (0.28 in) D
  • 5th, 6th gen:
  • 123.4 mm (4.86 in) H
  • 58.6 mm (2.31 in) W
  • 6.1 mm (0.24 in) D
Mass
  • 1st gen: 120 g (4.2 oz)
  • 2nd, 3rd gen: 115 g (4.1 oz)
  • 4th gen: 101 g (3.6 oz)
  • 5th, 6th gen: 88 g (3.1 oz)
Related articlesiPod Nano
iPod Classic
iPod Shuffle
List of iOS devices
Websitewww.apple.com/ipod-touch/

Software

The iPod Touch runs Apple's Unix-based iOS operating system (called 'iPhone OS' until 2010) and includes bundled software to browse the Internet, view maps, send and receive email, view media, and work with office documents, presentations, and spreadsheets. Users type on a virtual keyboard displayed on the screen. Apple operates an online store, allowing users to buy and directly download music, videos and third-party software. From launch, the iPod Touch was described by journalists as an 'iPhone without the phone',[9] and each iPod Touch model to date has been introduced with the same release number of iOS as the contemporary iPhone model.

Successive updates to iOS since the initial release in 2007 have released additional features. iPhone OS 2.0, released on July 11, 2008, introduced the App Store, which allowed third-party applications for the first time. iPhone OS 3.0, released on June 17, 2009, added features such as cut, copy, and paste, data tethering and push notification support. iOS 4.0, released on June 21, 2010, introduced iBooks, FaceTime, and multitasking. It dropped support for the first generation iPod Touch.

In June 2011, iOS 5, the fifth major release of iOS software, was announced at Apple's WWDC 2011, which added notification, messaging and reminder features.[10] Apple limited some features, most notably the voice control system Siri, to the iPhone.[11] iOS 6, which was released on September 19, 2012 to the fourth and fifth generation iPod Touch models, contains 200 new features including Passbook, Facebook integration and Apple Maps. The fifth generation iPod Touch gained the ability to take panoramic photos, a feature shared with the iPhone 4S and iPhone 5.[12]

On June 8, 2015, it was announced at the WWDC that the iPod Touch fifth generation would support iOS 9, along with other A5 devices. This makes the iPod Touch fifth generation the first iPod Touch to support four major versions of iOS.

Recent iOS updates have been free for owners of supported iPod Touch models, but Apple received criticism for charging iPod Touch owners for versions 2.0 and 3.0, which iPhone owners received for free, and for excluding certain features from the iPod Touch software that the iPhone included.[13][14] Apple's position was that they could add features for free to the iPhone because the revenue from it is accounted for on a subscription basis under accounting rules, rather than as a one time payment.[15] At WWDC in June 2010, as of iOS 4, Steve Jobs announced that Apple had "found a way" to make subsequent OS upgrades available free to iPod Touch owners.

Purchasing content

To purchase content on the iPod Touch, the user must create an Apple ID or have an existing account. With this account one may download music and videos from the iTunes Store, apps from the App Store, or books from the iBook store. An Apple ID account created without a credit card can be used to get free content, and gift cards can be bought to pay for apps instead of using credit cards. This is convenient for users who want to purchase an app, song, video, or E-book, but do not have a credit card.

Third-party applications

The only official way to obtain third-party applications for the iPod Touch is Apple's App Store, which is a branch of iTunes Store. The App Store application, available in all versions of iOS from 2.0 onwards, allows users to browse and download applications from a single online repository (hosted by Apple) with the iTunes Store. To develop such software, a software development kit (SDK) was officially announced on March 6, 2008, at an Apple Town Hall meeting.[16] The iOS SDK allows making applications for the iPhone and iPod Touch after paying a fee to join the development team. The developer can then set the price for the applications they develop and will receive 70% of money earned. Apple retains 30% of the sale price with no minimum fixed fee.

User-made modifications

Like all of Apple's iOS devices, the iPod Touch is a tightly controlled or closed platform. Modifying or replacing the operating system voids the device warranty, communication between apps is limited and controlled, and Apple is the only authorized software vendor. Hackers have attempted to 'jailbreak' all iOS devices to enable forbidden or unsupported features, such as multitasking in iOS versions before 4.0, themes for the home screen and the use of software Apple has refused to sell such as a battery percentage indicator. Jailbreaks for the iPod Touch first surfaced a month after the first model was released in September 2007, when hackers released JailbreakMe 1.0 (also called "AppSnapp") to jailbreak iPhone OS 1.1.1.[17][18] This allowed users to install third-party programs on their devices before Apple permitted this.

Apple's warranty statement implies that an iPod Touch after jailbreaking or other modification made by unofficial means is not covered by Apple's warranty. Jailbreaking is a violation of the Terms and Conditions for using iOS. However, the jailbreaking process can normally be undone by performing a restore through iTunes.[19]

Comparison to the iPhone

The iPod Touch is generally similar to the iPhone. Compared to a same-generation iPhone, an iPod Touch is thinner, lighter and less expensive, while lacking some hardware and software features. Steve Jobs once referred to the iPod Touch as "training wheels for the iPhone".[20]

All iPods lack Touch ID, 3D Touch, NFC, GPS, an earpiece speaker and a noise-cancelling microphone. Depending on the generation, the iPod Touch may have a smaller or inferior display and camera(s). Newer models (5th and 6th generation) lack the ambient light sensor that makes automatic brightness available. The 1st Generation iPod Touch lacks a built-in speaker, a microphone, a camera, and a flash. Like iPhones, newer iPod Touches support AirDrop, and an LED flash was added starting with the 5th Generation iPod Touch.

The iPod Touch has no cellular modem, and therefore cannot make phone calls. However, it can make FaceTime calls over an internet connection, and send iMessages to other iPhones, iPads, and iPod Touches with an Apple ID. The 6th generation iPod Touch can forward phone calls through a separate iPhone, with the Wi-Fi Calling feature. The two devices must be paired, and the iPhone's carrier must support this feature.[21]

Requirements

As of the 6th Generation iPod Touch:

  • iTunes 12.3 or later
  • macOS 10.8.5 or later
  • Windows 7 or later

Setup and synchronization

For iPod Touch units bought before October 12, 2011 users must own a Mac or PC computer to be able to use the iPod. Users then must install iTunes and connect the iPod through a USB port. The iPod will then be set up in iTunes. New iPods bought after October 12, 2011 have iOS 5.0 preloaded, and allow activation wirelessly, without the need of a PC or Mac.[22]

Earlier iPod Touch units must be plugged into a computer to be synced. This will charge the iPod Touch and sync the music library, videos, pictures and backup data. iOS 5 enables the user to do all this from the device and send it to the iCloud service, which supports macOS Lion and later.

Battery charging with FireWire

Starting with the second generation model, the iPod Touch dropped support charging from the 12 V pin of a FireWire cable.[23] Charging the iPod Touch takes about 2 hours (80 percent capacity) for fast charge, and full charge takes about 4 hours.

Apple Lightning connector

Lightning connector
Apple Lightning connector

The fifth and sixth generations of the iPod touch both feature a new dock connector, called "Lightning", which replaces the 30-pin dock connector on older iPhone, iPad and iPod models. The Apple Lightning connector has eight pins and all the signaling is digital. This new connector is smaller than the previous one allowing for a slimmer form factor. Apple Lightning cables have duplicate pins on both sides of the plug, this makes the plug reversible. Various accessories are available to connect the Apple Lightning connector to the older 30-pin dock connector or USB,[24] although not all old accessories will work, because the lightning connector cannot handle analog signals.[25]

Models

As of January 2019, there are six types of produced iPod Touch devices.

  • 1st generation (2007–2008) Supported until 2010 (iPhone OS 3.1.3)
  • 2nd generation (2008–2010) Supported until 2011 (iOS 4.2.1)
  • 3rd generation (2009–2010) Supported until 2012 (iOS 5.1.1)
  • 4th generation (2010–2012) Supported until 2014 (iOS 6.1.6)
  • 5th generation (2012–2015) Supported until 2016 (iOS 9.3.5)
  • 6th generation (2015–present) Supported as of 2019 (iOS 12.1.4)

Timeline of models

(Not updated to Late 2018 devices)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Smith, Mat (May 30, 2013). "Apple: 100 million iPod touches sold since 2007". Engadget. AOL Inc. Retrieved January 29, 2014.
  2. ^ "New A8 iPod Touch Clocks in at 1.10GHz, Includes 1GB RAM and Bluetooth 4.1".
  3. ^ Brandon Chester. "Apple Refreshes The iPod Touch With A8 SoC And New Cameras".
  4. ^ "Apple - iPod touch - Technical Specifications". Apple. Apple Inc. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  5. ^ "iPod touch - Features". Apple. Retrieved June 10, 2013.
  6. ^ Although physical memory usually comes in powers-of-two GiB, Apple lists its capacities in GB, and also allows for formatting overhead.
  7. ^ "Apple cuts prices on iPod Touch line, refreshes 16GB model". CNET. June 26, 2014. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  8. ^ "Apple removes iPod nano and shuffle from website hinting at discontinuation". 9to5Mac. 27 July 2017. Retrieved 27 July 2017.
  9. ^ Sadun, Erica (September 5, 2007). "Apple announces iPod Touch: iPhone without the phone". TUAW. Retrieved September 5, 2007.
  10. ^ "Apple announce iOS 5 and iPhone release date". Apple. October 4, 2011. Retrieved October 4, 2011.
  11. ^ Lawler, Richard (October 4, 2011). "iPod touch still maxes out at 64GB / $399, available in white October 12th". Engadget. AOL. Retrieved May 5, 2012.
  12. ^ Gunther, Cory (September 19, 2012). "What's new in iOS 6? Here's the changelog". SlashGear. R3 Media. Retrieved January 1, 2013.
  13. ^ Block, Ryan (January 17, 2008). "iPod touch users: if you bought after Jan 1 the new apps are free – maybe". Engadget. AOL. Retrieved March 3, 2010.
  14. ^ Arya, Aayush (January 24, 2008). "Early Adopter Tax Resurfaces with the iPod touch January Software Upgrade". AppleMatters. Retrieved March 3, 2010.
  15. ^ Dalrymple, Jim. "Accounting rules behind iPod touch update charge". Macworld. Retrieved March 3, 2010.
  16. ^ Block, Ryan (March 8, 2008). "Live from Apple's iPhone SDK press conference". Engadget. AOL. Retrieved March 3, 2010.
  17. ^ Wilson, Ben (October 10, 2007). "Official iPhone 1.1.1 jailbreak released with easy-to-follow instructions; does not require TIFF exploit". CNET. CBS Interactive. Retrieved November 10, 2009.
  18. ^ Keizer, Gregg (October 29, 2007). "Hacker Software Can Install Unauthorized Software on iPhones". PCWorld. Retrieved August 25, 2011.
  19. ^ "iPod and iSight Warranty" (PDF). Apple. p. 1. Retrieved December 24, 2008.
  20. ^ Fildes, Nic (September 19, 2007). "iPhone finally arrives but it's neither cheap nor G3". The Independent. UK. Retrieved October 24, 2008.
  21. ^ "Make a call with Wi-Fi Calling". Apple Support. Retrieved 4 January 2019.
  22. ^ "iOS 5 - See new features included in iOS 5". Apple. Archived from the original on October 6, 2011. Retrieved November 29, 2011.
  23. ^ "iPhone and iPod touch: Charging the battery". Apple. October 15, 2008. Retrieved January 12, 2010.
  24. ^ "Apple iPhone 5 features". Apple. September 12, 2012. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  25. ^ McGlaun, Shane (September 13, 2012). "iPhone 5 won't work with some accessories even with Apple Lightning adapter". SlashGear. R3 Media. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  26. ^ Apple Inc., Newsroom Archive - Apple, Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  27. ^ Mactracker (mactracker.ca), Apple Inc. model database, version as of 26 July 2007.

External links

AirDrop

AirDrop is an ad-hoc service in Apple Inc.'s macOS and iOS operating systems, introduced in Mac OS X Lion (Mac OS X 10.7) and iOS 7, which enables the transfer of files among supported Macintosh computers and iOS devices over Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, without using mail or a mass storage device.Prior to OS X Yosemite (OS X 10.10), and under OS X Lion, Mountain Lion, and Mavericks (OS X 10.7–10.9, respectively) the AirDrop protocol in macOS was different from the AirDrop protocol of iOS, and the two were therefore not interoperable with each other. OS X Yosemite and later support the iOS AirDrop protocol, which is used for transfers between a Mac and an iOS device as well as between two 2012 or later Mac computers, and which uses both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Legacy mode for the old AirDrop protocol (which only uses Wi-Fi) between two 2012 or older Mac computers is also available.There is no restriction on the size of the file which AirDrop will accommodate.

Apple A4

The Apple A4 is a 32-bit package on package (PoP) system-on-a-chip (SoC) designed by Apple Inc. and manufactured by Samsung. It combines an ARM Cortex-A8 CPU with a PowerVR GPU, and emphasizes power efficiency. The chip commercially debuted with the release of Apple's iPad tablet; followed shortly by the iPhone 4 smartphone, the iPod Touch (4th generation), and the Apple TV (2nd generation). It was superseded by the Apple A5 processor used in the iPad 2 released the following year, which was then subsequently replaced by the Apple A5X processor in the iPad (3rd generation).

Apple A5

The Apple A5 is a 32-bit system-on-a-chip designed by Apple Inc. and manufactured by Samsung and is the successor to the Apple A4. The A5 commercially debuted with the release of Apple's iPad 2 tablet, and also powers the iPhone 4S, iPod Touch fifth generation, Apple TV third generation, and the iPad mini first generation. This is consistent with how Apple debuted the A4 chip: first in the original iPad, followed by the iPhone 4, and then the iPod Touch (fourth generation). Apple claims that compared to its predecessor, the A4, the A5 CPU "can do twice the work" and the GPU has "up to nine times the graphics performance".

Apple earbuds

Apple EarPods are white in-ear headphones included with music players and smartphones designed and marketed by Apple Inc. They are designed to fit the ear while retaining a new design pushed by Apple alongside the iPod and iPod Touch products, with which they were sold together. They are the standard headphones provided with Apple iPhone purchases.

Bookworm (video game)

Bookworm is a word-forming puzzle video game by PopCap Games. From a grid of available letters, players connect letters to form words. As words are formed, they are removed from the grid and the remaining letters collapse to fill the available space. Players earn more points by creating longer words or words which use less common letters and earn less for smaller words. In November 2006, PopCap Games released a sequel, Bookworm Adventures. Bookworm was released for the Nintendo DS digital distribution service DSiWare on November 30, 2009. It has also been released on the regular Nintendo DS cartridge.

Cocoa Touch

Cocoa Touch is a UI framework for building software programs to run on iOS for the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad, watchOS for the Apple Watch, and tvOS for the fourth-generation Apple TV, from Apple Inc.

Cocoa Touch provides an abstraction layer of iOS, the operating system for the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Cocoa Touch is based on the macOS Cocoa API toolset and, like it, is primarily written in the Objective-C language. Cocoa Touch allows the use of hardware and features that are not found in macOS computers and are thus unique to the iOS range of devices. Just like Cocoa, Cocoa Touch follows a Model-View-Controller (MVC) software architecture.

Cocoa Touch contains a different set of graphical control elements to Cocoa. Tools for developing applications based on Cocoa Touch are included in the iOS SDK.

Find My iPhone

Find My iPhone (also known as Find apple on the SpringBoard, and also known specifically for other devices as Find My iPad, Find My iPod touch, or Find My Mac) is an app and service provided by Apple Inc. that allows remote location tracking of iOS devices, Mac computers, Apple Watch, and AirPods. As of March 2013, the service currently is available for iOS 5 or later and OS X 10.7.5 "Lion" or later through iCloud.

The service itself is integrated into iOS and macOS, while enabled devices can be tracked using either an iOS app or the iCloud website. On iOS 8 and older, the tracking app can be downloaded from the App Store free of charge. Starting in iOS 9, the app was bundled with the operating system.

IOS

iOS (formerly iPhone OS) is a mobile operating system created and developed by Apple Inc. exclusively for its hardware. It is the operating system that presently powers many of the company's mobile devices, including the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. It is the second most popular mobile operating system globally after Android.

Originally unveiled in 2007 for the iPhone, iOS has been extended to support other Apple devices such as the iPod Touch (September 2007) and the iPad (January 2010). As of March 2018, Apple's App Store contains more than 2.1 million iOS applications, 1 million of which are native for iPads. These mobile apps have collectively been downloaded more than 130 billion times.

The iOS user interface is based upon direct manipulation, using multi-touch gestures. Interface control elements consist of sliders, switches, and buttons. Interaction with the OS includes gestures such as swipe, tap, pinch, and reverse pinch, all of which have specific definitions within the context of the iOS operating system and its multi-touch interface. Internal accelerometers are used by some applications to respond to shaking the device (one common result is the undo command) or rotating it in three dimensions (one common result is switching between portrait and landscape mode). Apple has been significantly praised for incorporating thorough accessibility functions into iOS, enabling users with vision and hearing disabilities to properly use its products.

Major versions of iOS are released annually. The current version, iOS 12, was released on September 17, 2018. It is available for all iOS devices with 64-bit processors; the iPhone 5S and later iPhone models, the iPad (2017), the iPad Air and later iPad Air models, all iPad Pro models, the iPad Mini 2 and later iPad Mini models, and the sixth-generation iPod Touch. On all recent iOS devices, iOS regularly checks on the availability of an update, and if one is available, will prompt the user to permit its automatic installation.

IOS 4

iOS 4 is the fourth major release of the iOS mobile operating system developed by Apple Inc., being the successor to iPhone OS 3. It was announced at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference on June 7, 2010, and was released on June 21, 2010. iOS 4 is the first iOS version issued under the "iOS" rebranding, dropping the "iPhone OS" naming convention of previous versions. It was succeeded by iOS 5 on October 12, 2011.iOS 4 introduced folders on the home screen, significantly increasing the number of apps that can be displayed. Support for custom wallpapers was also added, although limited to newer devices due to animation performance requirements. The operating system also added a multitasking feature, letting apps dealing with Internet calling, location and audio playback function in the background, whereas a similar but more restricted "Fast App Switching" technology enabled any app to be left inactive in the background while users switch to other apps. iOS 4 also added a system-wide spell checking feature, enabled iBooks on iPhone, unified the Mail inbox to combine content from different email providers, and introduced both Game Center for social gaming and FaceTime for video calling.

The iOS 4 update introduced performance and battery problems on iPhone 3G devices, with Apple investigating the matter and promising then-upcoming updates. However, the company became the subject of a lawsuit from an unsatisfied customer over the issues. Around the same time, the release of iPhone 4 and its subsequent antenna problems made Apple focus on unsuccessfully attempting to patch the issues with software updates.

IOS 5

iOS 5 is the fifth major release of the iOS mobile operating system developed by Apple Inc., being the successor to iOS 4. It was announced at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference on June 6, 2011, and was released on October 12, 2011. It was succeeded by iOS 6 on September 19, 2012.iOS 5 revamped notifications, adding temporary banners that appear at the top of screen and introducing the Notification Center, a central location for all recent notifications. The operating system also added iCloud, Apple's cloud storage service for synchronization of content and data across iCloud-enabled devices, and iMessage, Apple's instant messaging service. For the first time, system software updates can be installed wirelessly, without requiring a computer and iTunes. iOS 5 also featured deep integration with Twitter, introduced multitasking gestures on iPads, and added an easily accessible camera shortcut from the lock screen.

iOS 5 was the subject of criticism for iPhone 4S users, as the initial release had poor battery life, failures of SIM cards, and echoes during phone calls. These problems were fixed in subsequent releases.

IOS SDK

The iOS SDK (Software Development Kit) (formerly iPhone SDK) is a software development kit developed by Apple Inc. The kit allows for the development of mobile apps on Apple's iOS operating system.

While originally developing iPhone prior to its unveiling in 2007, Apple's then-CEO Steve Jobs did not intend to let third-party developers build native apps for iOS, instead directing them to make web applications for the Safari web browser. However, backlash from developers prompted the company to reconsider, with Jobs announcing in October 2007 that Apple would have a software development kit available for developers by February 2008. The SDK was released on March 6, 2008.

The SDK is a free download for users of Mac personal computers. It is not available for Microsoft Windows PCs. The SDK contains sets giving developers access to various functions and services of iOS devices, such as hardware and software attributes. It also contains an iPhone simulator to mimic the look and feel of the device on the computer while developing. New versions of the SDK accompany new versions of iOS. In order to test applications, get technical support, and distribute apps through App Store, developers are required to subscribe to the Apple Developer Program.

Combined with Xcode, the iOS SDK helps developers write iOS apps using officially supported programming languages, including Swift and Objective-C. Other companies have also created tools that allow for the development of native iOS apps using their respective programming languages.

IOS jailbreaking

iOS jailbreaking is privilege escalation for the purpose of removing software restrictions imposed by Apple on iOS, tvOS and watchOS. It typically does this by using a series of kernel patches. Jailbreaking permits root access to iOS, allowing the installation of software that is unavailable through the official Apple App Store.

Apple publicly disapproves of jailbreaking, stating that it can cause device instability. This has lead to Apple implementing hardware and software fixes to the vulnerabilities used in jailbreaks, meaning that many versions of iOS are not jailbroken immediately.

IOS version history

iOS is a mobile operating system, developed by Apple Inc. for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. Updates for iOS are released through the iTunes software and, since iOS 5, via over-the-air software updates. With the announcement of iOS 5 on June 6, 2011, a USB connection to iTunes was no longer needed to activate iOS devices; data synchronization can happen automatically and wirelessly through Apple's iCloud service. Major new iOS releases are announced yearly during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC), and are usually released in September of the same year, usually coinciding with the release of new iPhone models. The most recent stable release, iOS 12.1.4 was released on February 7, 2019.

IPhone OS 1

iPhone OS 1 is the first major release of iOS, Apple's mobile operating system. iPhone OS 1.1.5 is the latest and the last version of Apple's iPhone OS 1. This version of iOS was the first iteration of the touch-centric mobile operating system. No official name was given on its initial release; Apple marketing literature simply stated that the iPhone runs a version of Apple's desktop operating system, macOS, then known as Mac OS X. On March 6, 2008, with the release of the iPhone software development kit (iPhone SDK), Apple named it iPhone OS (they later went on to rename it "iOS" on June 7, 2010). It was succeeded by iPhone OS 2 on July 11, 2008.

The iPhone OS 1.1.3 update cost $19.95 for iPod Touch users.

IPhone OS 2

iPhone OS 2 is the second major release of the iOS mobile operating system developed by Apple Inc., being the successor to iPhone OS 1. It was the first release of iOS to support third-party applications via the App Store. iPhone OS 2.2.1 was the final version of iPhone OS 2. It was succeeded by iPhone OS 3 on June 17, 2009.

iPhone OS 2.0 became available on July 11, 2008 with the release of the iPhone 3G. Devices running 1.x are upgradable to this version. This version of iOS introduces the App Store, making third-party applications available to the iPhone and iPod Touch. Prior to the public release of iPhone OS 2.0, Apple held a keynote event to announce the iPhone OS Software Development Kit ("SDK") to developers.

IPhone OS 3

iPhone OS 3 is the third major release of the iOS mobile operating system developed by Apple Inc., being the successor to iPhone OS 2. It was announced on March 17, 2009, and was released on June 17, 2009. It was succeeded by iOS 4 on June 21, 2010; the new version dropped the "iPhone OS" naming convention. iPhone OS 3 was the last version to use the "iPhone OS" naming convention.

iPhone OS 3 added a system-wide "cut, copy, or paste" dialog bubble, allowing users to more easily move content. It also introduced Spotlight, a search indexing feature designed to help users locate specific information on their device, such as contacts, email messages or apps. The home screen was expanded to let users add up to 11 pages, showcasing a total of 180 apps. The Messages app received support for MMS, while the Camera app received support for video recording on iPhone 3GS, and a new "Voice Memos" app let users record their voice.

IPod Touch (5th generation)

The fifth-generation iPod Touch (stylized and marketed as the iPod touch, and colloquially known as the iPod Touch 5G or iPod Touch 5) was unveiled at Apple's media event alongside the iPhone 5 on September 12, 2012, and was released on October 11, 2012. An all-purpose pocket computer designed and marketed by Apple Inc. with a touchscreen-based user interface, it succeeded the 4th-generation iPod Touch. It is compatible with up to iOS 9.3.5, which was released on August 25, 2016.

Like the iPhone 5, the fifth-generation iPod Touch is a slimmer, lighter model that introduces a higher-resolution, 4-inch screen to the series with 16:9 widescreen aspect ratio. Other improvements include support for recording 1080p video and panoramic still photos via the rear camera, an LED flash, Apple's A5 chip (the same chip used in the iPad Mini (1st generation), iPad 2, and iPhone 4S) and support for Apple's Siri.

Additionally, unlike its predecessors, the iPod Touch was made available in space grey, silver, pink, yellow, blue, and Product Red.The device was initially only sold in 32 GB and 64 GB models. The first 16 GB model, introduced on May 30, 2013, was only available in one color and lacks the rear iSight camera and the iPod Touch Loop that is included in the 32 GB models. On June 26, 2014, it was replaced with a new 16 GB model that no longer omits the rear camera and full range of color options. The pricing for the iPod Touch had also changed. The 16 GB model is $199 instead of $229, the 32 GB model is $249 instead of $299, and the 64 GB model is $299 instead of $399.The iPod Touch (5th generation) was officially discontinued by Apple on July 15, 2015, with the release of its successor, the iPod Touch (6th generation). However, Apple still continues to sell refurbished models.

IPod Touch (6th generation)

The sixth-generation iPod Touch (stylized and marketed as the iPod touch, and colloquially known as the iPod touch 6G, iPod touch 6, or iPod touch (2015)) is a multipurpose handheld device designed and marketed by Apple Inc. with a touchscreen-based user interface. It is the successor to the iPod Touch (5th generation), becoming the first major update to the iPod lineup in more than two and a half years. It was released on the online Apple Store on July 15, 2015, along with minor upgrades to the iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle.

Timeline of Apple Inc. products

This timeline of Apple Inc. products is a list of all stand-alone Apple II, Macintosh, and other computers, as well as computer peripherals, expansion cards, ancillary products, and consumer electronics sold by Apple Inc. This list is ordered by the release date of the products.

iOS and iOS-based products
Hardware
Software
Bundled apps
Apple apps
Services
Other
Models
Accessories
Software
Other
Apple hardware since 1998
Consumer desktop/all-in-ones
Professional tower/desktop
Consumer notebook
Professional notebooks
Consumer electronics
Smartphones
Accessories
Products
Services
Companies
Related
Executives
Board of
directors
Founders

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.