IATA airport code

An IATA airport code, also known as an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier,[1] is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). The characters prominently displayed on baggage tags attached at airport check-in desks are an example of a way these codes are used.

The assignment of these codes is governed by IATA Resolution 763, and it is administered by IATA headquarters in Montreal. The codes are published semiannually in the IATA Airline Coding Directory.[2]

IATA also provides codes for railway stations and for airport handling entities. A list of airports sorted by IATA code is available. A list of railway station codes, shared in agreements between airlines and rail lines such as Amtrak, SNCF French Railways, and Deutsche Bahn, is available. Many railway administrations have their own list of codes for their stations, such as the list of Amtrak station codes.

List

List of airports by IATA code: A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

See also: List of airports by ICAO code

History and conventions

Airport codes arose out of the convenience that it brought pilots for location identification in the 1930s. Initially, pilots in the United States used the two-letter code from the National Weather Service (NWS) for identifying cities. This system became unmanageable for cities and towns without an NWS identifier, thus a three-letter system of airport codes was implemented. This system allowed for 17,576 permutations, assuming all letters can be used in conjunction with each other.[3]

Generally speaking, airport codes are named after the first three letters of the city in which it is located—ATL for Atlanta, SIN for Singapore, ASU for Asunción, MEX for Mexico City, DEN for Denver; IST for Istanbul; or a combination of the letters in its name, EWR for Newark, GDL for Guadalajara, JNB for Johannesburg, HKG for Hong Kong, SLC for Salt Lake City and WAW for Warsaw. Some airports in the United States retained their NWS codes and simply appended an X at the end, such as LAX for Los Angeles, PDX for Portland, and PHX for Phoenix.[3]

Sometimes the airport code reflects pronunciation, rather than spelling, such as NAN, which reflects the pronunciation of "Nadi" as [ˈnandi] in Fijian, where "d" is realized as the prenasalized stop [ⁿd].

For many reasons, some airport codes do not fit the normal scheme described above. Some airports, for example, cross several municipalities or regions, and mix the letters around, giving rise to DFW for Dallas–Fort Worth, DTW for Detroit–Wayne County, LBA for Leeds Bradford (Airport), MSP for Minneapolis–Saint Paul, and RDU for Raleigh–Durham.

Canada originally used two letters for identification of a weather reporting station in the 1930s. Additionally, preceding the two-letter code, was placed a Y (meaning "yes") where the reporting station was co-located with an airport, a W (meaning "without") where the reporting station was not co-located with an airport, and a U where the reporting station was co-located with an NDB. An X was used if the last two letters of the code had already been taken by another Canadian ident, and a Z was used if the locater could be confused with a U.S. three letter identifier.

Cities with multiple airports

In large metropolitan areas, airport codes are often named after the airport itself instead of the city it serves, while another code is reserved which refers to the city itself. For instance:

Or using a code for the city in one of the major airport and then assign another code to another airport:

When different cities with the same name each have an airport, the airports need to be assigned different codes. For example,

Sometimes, a new airport is built, replacing the old one, leaving the city's new "major" airport code to no longer correspond with the city's name. The original airport in Nashville, Tennessee was built in 1936 as part of the Works Progress Administration and called Berry Field with the designation, BNA. A new facility known as Nashville International Airport was built in 1987 but still uses BNA. This is in conjunction to rules aimed to avoid confusion that seem to apply in the United States, which state that "the first and second letters or second and third letters of an identifier may not be duplicated with less than 200 nautical miles separation."[3] Thus, Washington D.C. area's three airports all have radically different codes: IAD for Washington–Dulles, DCA for Washington–Reagan (District of Columbia Airport), and BWI for Baltimore (Baltimore–Washington International, formerly BAL).[3] Since HOU is used for William P. Hobby Airport, the new Houston–Intercontinental became IAH.[3] The code BKK was originally assigned to Bangkok–Don Mueang and was later transferred to Suvarnabhumi Airport, The code ISK was originally assigned to Nashik's old airport (Gandhinagar Airport) and later on transferred to Nashik's new airport (Ozar)Airport, while the former adopted DMK. Shanghai–Hongqiao retained the code SHA, while the newer Shanghai–Pudong adopted PVG. The opposite is true for Berlin, the airport Berlin–Tegel uses the code TXL, while its smaller counterpart Berlin–Schönefeld uses SXF; the new Berlin Brandenburg Airport is going to have the code BER. Hamburg (HAM) and Hannover (HAJ) are less than 100 NM apart and still use the same first and middle letter, indicating that this rule might be followed only locally.

Cities or airports changing names

Many cities retain historical names in their airport codes, despite the fact that their official name or its official spelling or transliteration is now different:

Some airport codes are based on previous names associated with a present airport, often with military heritage. These include:

  • Chicago's O'Hare, which is assigned ORD based on its old name of Orchard Field. It was expanded and renamed O'Hare in the mid-1950s.
  • Orlando International Airport was founded as Orlando Army Air Field #2 but uses MCO from being renamed McCoy Air Force Base in 1959 after a wing commander who crashed at the field in 1958. It was converted in the early 1960s to joint civilian/military use and renamed Orlando Jetport at McCoy, then became finally Orlando International Airport in the early 1980s.
  • Spokane International Airport was so named in 1960 but goes by GEG because it was built on the former Geiger Field, renamed in 1941 for Major Harold Geiger when the US Army acquired it.

Other airport codes are not obvious in origin, and each has its own peculiarities:

  • Nashville uses BNA due to its former name as Berry Field, henceforth Berry Nashville Airport
  • Knoxville uses TYS due to Charles McGhee Tyson, whose family donated the land for the first airport in Knoxville
  • Kahului, the main gateway into Maui, uses OGG in homage to Hawaiian aviation pioneer Bertram J. Hogg

In Asia, codes that do not correspond with their city's names include Niigata's KIJ, Nanchang's KHN, Pyongyang's FNJ, and Kobe's UKB.

Some airports are identified even in colloquial speech by their airport code. The most notable examples are LAX and JFK.

National policies

Since the U.S. Navy reserved "N" codes and the Federal Communications Commission has reserved rights for "W" and "K", certain U.S. cities which begin with these letters had to adopt "irregular" airport codes: EWR for Newark, ORF for Norfolk, Virginia, EYW for Key West, Florida, and APC for Napa, California.[3] This "rule" does not apply outside the United States: Karachi is KHI, Warsaw is WAW, Nagoya is NGO. In addition, since "Q" was used for international communications, cities with "Q" beginning their name also had to find alternate codes, as in the case of Qiqihar (NDG), Quetta (UET) and Quito (UIO).

IATA codes should not be confused with the FAA identifiers of US airports. Most FAA identifiers agree with the corresponding IATA codes, but some do not, such as Saipan whose FAA identifier is GSN and its IATA code is SPN, and some coincide with IATA codes of non-US airports.

Most large airports in Canada have codes that begin with the letter "Y", although not all "Y" codes are Canadian (for example, YUM for Yuma, Arizona and YNT for Yantai,China) and not all Canadian airports start with the letter "Y" (for example ZBF for Bathurst, New Brunswick). Many Canadian airports have a code that starts with W, X or Z, but none of these are major airports. When the Canadian transcontinental railways were built, each station was assigned its own two letter Morse code. VR was Vancouver, TZ Toronto, QB Quebec, WG Winnipeg, SJ St. Johns, YC Calgary, OW Ottawa, EG Edmonton, etc. When the Canadian government established airports, it used the existing railway codes for them as well. If the airport had a weather station, authorities added a "Y" to the front of the code, meaning "Yes" to indicate it had a weather station, or some other letter to indicate it did not. When international codes were created in cooperation with the United States, because "Y" was seldom used in the US, Canada simply used the weather station codes for its airports, changing the "Y" to a "Z" if it conflicted with an airport code already in use. The result is that most major Canadian airport codes start with "Y" followed by two letters in the city's name: YOW for Ottawa, YWG for Winnipeg, YYC for Calgary, and YVR for Vancouver, whereas other Canadian airports append the two letter code of the radio beacons that were the closest to the actual airport, such as YQX in Gander and YXS in Prince George.

Four of the ten provincial capital airports in Canada have ended up with codes beginning with YY, including YYZ for Toronto, Ontario, YYJ for Victoria, British Columbia, YYT for St. John's, Newfoundland, and YYG for Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. Canada's largest airport is YYZ for Toronto–Pearson (YTZ was used for Toronto City Airport, so YYZ is the station code for a village called Malton, which is where Toronto Pearson International Airport is actually located). YUL is used for Montréal–Trudeau (UL was the ID code for beacon in the city of Kirkland, now the location of Montréal–Trudeau). While these codes make it difficult for the public to associate them with a particular Canadian city, some codes have become popular in usage despite their cryptic nature, particularly at the largest airports. Toronto's YYZ code has entered pop culture in the form of a popular rock song utilizing the "YYZ" Morse code signal. Some airports have started using their IATA codes as marketing brands. Calgary International Airport has begun using its airport code YYC as a marketing brand and name for the airport authority web site (yyc.com),[4] while Vancouver International Airport advertises as YVR (yvr.com).

Numerous New Zealand airports use codes which contain a letter Z, to distinguish them from similar airport names in other countries. Examples include HLZ for Hamilton, ZQN for Queenstown, and WSZ for Westport.

Lack of codes

There are several airports with scheduled service that have not been assigned ICAO codes that do have IATA codes. For example, several airports in Alaska have scheduled commercial service, such as Stebbins Airport and Nanwalek Airport, using FAA codes instead. There are also airports with scheduled service for which there are ICAO codes but not IATA codes, such as Nkhotakota Airport/Tangole Airport in Malawi or Chōfu Airport in Tokyo, Japan. Also several minor airports in Russia (e.g. Omsukchan Airport) which instead use internal Russian codes for booking. Flights to these airports can not be booked through the international air booking systems (or have luggage transferred all the way), they are instead booked through the airline or a domestic booking system. Thus, neither system completely includes all airports with scheduled service.

See also

References

  1. ^ IATA. "IATA - Codes - Airline and Airport Codes Search". www.iata.org.
  2. ^ IATA. "IATA - Airline Coding Directory". www.iata.org.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Airport ABCs: An Explanation of Airport Identifier Codes". Air Line Pilot. Air Line Pilots Association. 1994. Retrieved 6 January 2012.
  4. ^ "YYC: Calgary Airport Authority". Retrieved 22 March 2015.

External links

ANY

ANY may refer to:

ANY (magazine), a New York-based architectural journal published from 1993 to 2000

Anthony Municipal Airport's IATA airport code

Athabasca Northern Railway's reporting mark

Albany Airport (Western Australia)

Albany Regional Airport (IATA: ALH, ICAO: YABA) is an airport serving Albany, Western Australia. It is located 6 nautical miles (11 km; 6.9 mi) northwest of Albany just off Albany Highway and operated by the City of Albany.Also known as Harry Riggs Albany Regional Airport, it is the largest airport in the Great Southern Region. The IATA airport code is sometimes listed as ABA and the ICAO airport code was previously YPAL.

The Royal Flying Doctors Service, general charter flights and Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) flights are also serviced by the airport.

Centre–Piedmont–Cherokee County Regional Airport

Centre–Piedmont–Cherokee County Regional Airport (ICAO: KPYP, FAA LID: PYP) is a public-use airport in Cherokee County, Alabama, United States. The airport is located five nautical miles (9 km) south of Centre, Alabama and 10 nautical miles (12 mi, 19 km) north of Piedmont, Alabama. It is owned by the CPCCR Airport Authority and was dedicated on October 14, 2010.This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 which categorized it as a general aviation facility.

This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of PYP by the Federal Aviation Administration, but it does not have an International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code.

Crystal River Airport

Crystal River Airport – Captain Tom Davis Field (ICAO: KCGC, FAA LID: CGC) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) southeast of the central business district of Crystal River, in Citrus County, Florida, United States. It is owned by Citrus County.This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of CGC by the Federal Aviation Administration, but it does not have an International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code (the IATA assigned CGC to Cape Gloucester Airport in Papua New Guinea).

Enterprise Municipal Airport (Alabama)

Enterprise Municipal Airport (IATA: ETS, ICAO: KEDN, FAA LID: EDN) is a city-owned, public-use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Enterprise, a city in Coffee County, Alabama, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility.This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of EDN by the Federal Aviation Administration, but the International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code is ETS.An EF4 tornado impacted near this area on March 1, 2007 before destroying the high school.

Harriman-and-West Airport

Harriman-and-West Airport (ICAO: KAQW, FAA LID: AQW), also known as Harriman & West or Harriman-West, is a public airport located three nautical miles (5 km) west of the central business district of North Adams, a city in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, United States. It is owned by the City of North Adams and is operated by a five-member Airport Commission.This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of AQW by the Federal Aviation Administration, but it does not have an International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code.

Herlong Recreational Airport

Herlong Recreational Airport (ICAO: KHEG, FAA LID: HEG), also known as Herlong Airport, is a public airport located eight nautical miles (13 km) southwest of the central business district of Jacksonville, a city in Duval County, Florida, United States.This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of HEG by the Federal Aviation Administration, but it does not have an International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code.The Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA) is the owner of all four public airports in Jacksonville and serves as the Fixed-Base Operator (FBO) at Herlong. The airport was originally built during World War II to facilitate pilot training for the Navy and Air Force. After the war, the property was given to the city, and subsequently the JAA.

In recognition of the improvements and excellent operations, Herlong Recreational Airport was named the Florida Department of Transportation's General Aviation Airport of the Year in 2001.

INN

INN may stand for:

Independent News Network

Independent Network News, see Independent Network News (disambiguation)

ImagiNation Network

The IATA airport code for Innsbruck Kranebitten Airport

Institute for Nonprofit News, formerly known as Investigative News Network

Interfaith Nutrition Network

International Nonproprietary Name

InterNetNews news server

Israel National News, English name for Israeli media network Arutz Sheva

Jack Edwards Airport

Jack Edwards Airport (IATA: GUF, ICAO: KJKA, FAA LID: JKA) is a public use airport in Baldwin County, Alabama, United States. It is owned by Gulf Shores Airport Authority and located two nautical miles (4 km) north of the City of Gulf Shores. Also known as Jack Edwards National Airport, it is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility.This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of JKA by the Federal Aviation Administration, but the International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code is GUF. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) airport code is KJKA.

List of airports in American Samoa

This is a list of airports in American Samoa (a U.S. territory), grouped by type and sorted by location. It contains all public-use and military airports. Some private-use and former airports may be included where notable, such as airports that were previously public-use, those with commercial enplanements recorded by the FAA or airports assigned an IATA airport code.

List of airports in Guam

This is a list of airports in Guam (a U.S. territory), grouped by type and sorted by location. It contains all public-use and military airports. Some private-use and former airports may be included where notable, such as airports that were previously public-use, those with commercial enplanements recorded by the FAA or airports assigned an IATA airport code.

MNM

MNM may refer to:

Radio MNM, a Flemish radio station

Master of Nonprofit Management, a post-graduate degree

Maternal near miss, a near-fatal event for a pregnant woman

MNM (professional wrestling), a wrestling stable

Mapena language (mnm), ISO 639 language code

Mutants & Masterminds (MnM), a role-playing game

Menominee-Marinette Twin County Airport (MNM), FAA and IATA airport code

Makkal Neethi Maiyam, a political party in Tamilnadu

Naval Outlying Field Santa Rosa

Naval Outlying Field (NOLF) Santa Rosa (ICAO: KNGS, FAA LID: NGS) is a military use airport located five nautical miles (9 km) southeast of the central business district of Milton, in Santa Rosa County, Florida, United States. It is owned by the United States Navy and has four asphalt paved runways (5/23, 9/27, 14/32, 18/36) all of which are 4,500 by 150 feet (1,372 x 46 m). The airfield is under the control of Commander, Training Air Wing FIVE at NAS Whiting Field, Florida.

This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of NGS by the Federal Aviation Administration, but it does not have an International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code (the IATA assigned NGS to Nagasaki Airport in Japan).

New Castle Municipal Airport

New Castle Municipal Airport (ICAO: KUCP, FAA LID: UCP) is a small municipal airport located in Union Township, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania serving Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, part of the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. Union Township is an outskirt of New Castle, Pennsylvania hence the name. The airport is located four nautical miles (7 km) northwest of the central business district of New Castle. The airport is a public-owned airport and is controlled by the Lawrence County Airport Authority.This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of UCP by the Federal Aviation Administration, but it does not have an International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code.

ORF

ORF or Orf may refer to:

Norfolk International Airport, IATA airport code ORF

Observer Research Foundation, an Indian research institute

One Race Films, a film production company founded by Vin Diesel

Open reading frame, a portion of the genome that has the potential to code for a protein

Open Road Films, a joint venture of Regal Entertainment Group and AMC Theaters

Operation River Falcon, a military operation in the Iraq War

Operation Royal Flush, a military deception employed by the Allied Nations during the Second World War

ORF (broadcaster), Austrian public service broadcaster

Orf (disease), a cutaneous condition

ORF III, sometimes called ORF 3, an Austrian television channel

ORF format, Olympus raw image file format with extension .orf

Orf, Iran, a village in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad Province, Iran

ROV

ROV may refer to:

Real options valuation

Recreational Off highway Vehicle, also known as Side by side or UTV (Utility Task Vehicle)

Remotely operated underwater vehicle

Republic of Vietnam was the name for South Vietnam during (1955–75)

Rostov-on-Don Airport, an airport in southern Russia (former IATA airport code)

Platov International Airport (IATA airport code)

Rostraver Airport

Rostraver Airport (ICAO: KFWQ, FAA LID: FWQ, formerly P53) is a public use airport in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, United States. It is located five nautical miles (9 km) east of the central business district of Monongahela, Pennsylvania in Rostraver Township. It is operated by the Westmoreland County Airport Authority, which also operates the Arnold Palmer Regional Airport in Unity Township, Pennsylvania.

This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of FWQ by the Federal Aviation Administration, but it does not have an International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code.

Tinian International Airport

Tinian International Airport (IATA: TIQ, ICAO: PGWT, FAA LID: TNI), also known as West Tinian Airport, is a public airport located on Tinian Island in the United States Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. This airport is owned by Commonwealth Ports Authority.This airport is assigned a three-letter location identifier of TNI by the Federal Aviation Administration, but the International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport code is TIQ (IATA assigned TNI to Satna Airport in India). The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) airport code is PGWT. Tinian International Airport is the hub of Star Marianas Air.

WAW

Waw or WAW may refer to:

Waw (letter), a letter in many semitic alphabets

Waw, the velomobile

Another spelling for the town Wau, Sudan

Waw Township, Burma

Warsaw Chopin Airport, an international airport serving Warsaw, Poland (IATA airport code)

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