Huntington Avenue Grounds

Huntington Avenue American League Baseball Grounds is the full name of the baseball stadium that formerly stood in Boston, Massachusetts, and was the first home field for the Boston Red Sox (known informally as the 'Boston Americans' until 1908) from 19011911. The stadium, built for $35,000 (equivalent to $1.05 million in 2018), was located on what is now Northeastern University, at the time across the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad tracks from the South End Grounds, home of the Boston Braves.

Huntington Avenue Grounds
The grounds during a game. Note building from which the famous 1903 "bird's-eye" photo was taken (see the infobox to the right for the picture).

The stadium was the site of the first World Series game between the modern American and National leagues in 1903, and also saw the first perfect game in the modern era, thrown by Cy Young on May 5, 1904. The playing field was built on a former circus lot and was extremely large by modern standards-530 feet to center field, later expanded to 635 feet in 1908. It had many quirks not seen in modern baseball stadiums, including patches of sand in the outfield where grass would not grow, and a tool shed in deep center field that was in play.

The Huntington Avenue Grounds was demolished after the Red Sox left at the beginning of the 1912 season to play at Fenway Park. The Cabot Center, an indoor athletic venue belonging to Northeastern University, has stood on the Huntington Grounds' footprint since 1954. A plaque and a statue of Cy Young were erected in 1993 where the pitchers mound used to be, commemorating the history of this ballpark in what is now called World Series Way. Meanwhile, a plaque on the side of the Cabot Center (1956) marks the former location of the left field foul pole.

The Cabot facility itself is barely over a quarter mile away to the southwest from another, still-standing Boston area sports facility of that era, Matthews Arena (built in 1910), the original home of the NHL's Boston Bruins when they started play in 1924.

Huntington Avenue American League Baseball Grounds
Huntington Avenue Grounds
WorldSeries1903-640
LocationBoston, Massachusetts
Coordinates42°20′20.3″N 71°5′20.3″W / 42.338972°N 71.088972°WCoordinates: 42°20′20.3″N 71°5′20.3″W / 42.338972°N 71.088972°W
OwnerBoston Red Sox
Capacity11,500
Field sizeLeft Field – 350 ft
Left-Center – 440 ft
Center Field – 530 ft (1901), 635 ft (1908)
Right Field – 280 ft (1901), 320 ft (1908)
Backstop – 60 ft
Construction
Broke groundMarch 9, 1901
OpenedMay 8, 1901
ClosedAfter 1911 season
Demolished1912
Tenants
Boston Red Sox (MLB) (1901–1911)

References

Preceded by
first stadium
Home of the Boston Red Sox
1901–1911
Succeeded by
Fenway Park
1901 Boston Americans season

The 1901 Boston Americans season was the first season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox, and the first season of play for the American League (AL). It resulted in the Americans finishing second in the AL with a record of 79 wins and 57 losses, four games behind the Chicago White Stockings. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1902 Boston Americans season

The 1902 Boston Americans season was the second season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 77 wins and 60 losses, ​6 1⁄2 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played their home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1903 Boston Americans season

The 1903 Boston Americans season was the third season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 47 losses, ​14 1⁄2 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. Boston went on to participate in the first World Series held between the AL and National League (NL) champions. The Americans won the 1903 World Series in eight games over the Pittsburgh Pirates. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played their home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1903 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1903 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 22nd year the Pittsburgh Pirates played in Major League Baseball. The club finished their season as National League champions, beating the second-place New York Giants by 6½ games. They went on to participate in the 1903 World Series, the first to be played between the champions of the National League and American League. The Pirates started off well, winning 3 of the first four games, but the Boston Americans won the last four straight to win the series five games to three. The Pirates set a record of 52 consecutive innings without allowing the opposing team to score a run, a record that still stands today.

1904 Boston Americans season

The 1904 Boston Americans season was the fourth season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 95 wins and 59 losses, ​1 1⁄2 games ahead of the New York Highlanders. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds. The Americans were set to play the National League (NL) champion New York Giants in the 1904 World Series, however the Giants refused to play.

1905 Boston Americans season

The 1905 Boston Americans season was the fifth season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 78 wins and 74 losses. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1906 Boston Americans season

The 1906 Boston Americans season was the sixth season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 49 wins and 105 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1907 Boston Americans season

The 1907 Boston Americans season was the seventh season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 59 wins and 90 losses. Including spring training, the team had five different managers during the season. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1908 Boston Red Sox season

The 1908 Boston Red Sox season was the eighth season for the Major League Baseball franchise previously known as the Boston Americans. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1909 Boston Red Sox season

The 1909 Boston Red Sox season was the ninth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 88 wins and 63 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1910 Boston Red Sox season

The 1910 Boston Red Sox season was the tenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 81 wins and 72 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1911 Boston Red Sox season

The 1911 Boston Red Sox season was the eleventh season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 78 wins and 75 losses. This was the final season that the team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds, before moving to Fenway Park.

Cabot Center

The Cabot Center is the home of several indoor athletic teams of Northeastern University Huskies in Boston, Massachusetts. Built in 1954 and named in 1957 for patron Godfrey Lowell Cabot, the building houses a variety of facilities for the various teams.

The arena is built on the site of the old Huntington Avenue Grounds, where the first-ever World Series baseball game was held in 1903, and is barely over a quarter-mile (402 m) away to the southwest from the Matthews Arena, the original home of the NHL's Boston Bruins ice hockey team in 1924.

Cy Young's perfect game

Cy Young, pitcher for the Boston Americans, pitched a perfect game against the Philadelphia Athletics by retiring all 27 batters he faced on Thursday, May 5, 1904. This event took place in the Huntington Avenue Grounds in Boston, Massachusetts, in front of 10,267 fans in attendance.

After Athletics' pitcher Rube Waddell defeated Young on April 25 and one-hit Boston on May 2, Waddell taunted Young to face him so that he could repeat his performance against Boston's ace. Three days later, Young pitched a perfect game against Waddell and the Athletics. The third perfect game in Major League Baseball history, Young's perfect game was the first in baseball's modern era and in American League history.

Doc McMahon

Henry John McMahon (December 19, 1886 – December 11, 1929) was a right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played briefly for the 1908 Boston Red Sox. McMahon was born in Woburn, Massachusetts, and attended the College of the Holy Cross.

McMahon's only major league appearance was on October 6, 1908, in Boston's next-to-last game of the season. He started against the New York Highlanders at the Huntington Avenue Grounds and collected an 11–3, complete game victory, allowing three earned runs (3.00 ERA), 14 hits and no walks while striking out three over nine innings of work. He helped himself with the bat, hitting 2-for-5. Coincidentally, the Highlanders' starting pitcher, Andy O'Connor, was also appearing in his only major league game.

McMahon played a few years in the minor leagues. He studied dentistry at Tufts University and opened a practice in his hometown of Woburn, Massachusetts, where he died of heart trouble eight days short of his 43rd birthday.

Fred Hoey

Fred Hoey (1885 – November 17, 1949) was a major league baseball broadcaster. Hoey called games for the Boston Braves from 1925–38 and Boston Red Sox from 1927-38.

Hoey was born in Boston, but raised in Saxonville, Massachusetts. At the age of 12, Hoey saw his first baseball game during the 1897 Temple Cup. Hoey would later play semipro baseball and work as an usher at the Huntington Avenue Grounds.In 1903, Hoey was hired as a sportswriter, writing about high school sports, baseball, and hockey. In 1924, he became the first publicity director of the Boston Bruins. Hoey began broadcasting Braves games in 1925 and Red Sox games in 1927, becoming the first full-time announcer for both teams.

In 1933, Hoey was hired by CBS Radio to call Games 1 and 5 of the World Series after commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis declared that Ted Husing and Graham McNamee could not call World Series games because they did not call any regular season games. Hoey was removed from the CBS broadcasting booth during the fourth inning of game one after his voice went out. Although reported as a cold, Hoey's garbled and incoherent words led many to think that Hoey was drunk. After this incident, Hoey never went to the broadcast booth without a tin of throat lozenges. His only other national assignment was calling the 1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, played in Boston, for Mutual.

After the 1936 season, Hoey was fired by the head of the Yankee Network, John Shepard III. Baseball fans, including Franklin D. Roosevelt rallied to his defense. After the 1938 season, Hoey demanded a raise, but the sponsors, despite public pressure, replaced Hoey with former player and manager Frankie Frisch. After leaving the booth, Hoey covered the Red Sox and Braves in Boston newspapers until 1946.Hoey died in Winthrop, Massachusetts, on November 17, 1949, of accidental gas asphyxiation.

List of Boston Red Sox no-hitters

The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Boston, Massachusetts, also known in their early years as the "Boston Americans" (1901–07). They play in the American League East division. Pitchers for the Red Sox have thrown 18 no-hitters in franchise history.A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball "when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings. In a no-hit game, a batter may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference." (No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form.) A no-hitter is rare enough that one team in Major League Baseball, the San Diego Padres, has never had a pitcher accomplish the feat. The New York Mets' first no-hitter (pitched by Johan Santana) came on June 1, 2012, in the team's 8,021st game and 51st season.One perfect game, a special subcategory of no-hitter, has been pitched in Red Sox history. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game." Every opposing batter is retired. This feat was achieved by Cy Young in 1904. Young's perfect game, pitched on May 5, 1904, also was the first no-hitter in Red Sox history; the most recent Red Sox no-hitter was thrown by Jon Lester on May 19, 2008.Two pitchers have thrown more than one no-hitter in a Red Sox uniform, Hall of Famer Cy Young and Dutch Leonard. Thirteen of the Red Sox no-hitters were thrown at home (the first four at the Huntington Avenue Grounds and the other nine at Fenway Park) and five on the road. Two were thrown in April, two in May, five in June, two in July, three in August, and four in September. The longest interval between Red Sox no-hitters was 35 years, 6 months, and 18 days, between the games pitched by Dave Morehead, on September 16, 1965 and Hideo Nomo, on April 4, 2001. The shortest interval between Red Sox no-hitters was merely 1 month and 6 days, between the games pitched by Earl Wilson on June 26, 1962 and Bill Monbouquette on August 1, 1962.The Red Sox have no-hit the Chicago White Sox and Baltimore Orioles (formerly the "St. Louis Browns") the most: four times each. The White Sox were no-hit by Jesse Tannehill in 1904, Bill Dinneen in 1905, Parnell in 1956, and Monbouquette in 1962. The Browns and Orioles were no-hit by Smokey Joe Wood in 1911, Leonard in 1916, Hideo Nomo in 2001, and Clay Buchholz in 2007. The Red Sox have won all of their no-hitters (three times in major league history a team has thrown a nine-inning no-hitter and lost the game). The most baserunners allowed in a Red Sox no-hitter was five, by Dutch Leonard in 1918. Of the 18 Red Sox no-hitters, four have been won by a score of 4–0 and another four by a score of 2–0, making those final scores more common than any other results. The largest margin of victory in a Red Sox no-hitter was 10–0, in wins by Derek Lowe in 2002 and Clay Buchholz in 2007. The smallest margin of victory was 1–0, Monbouquette's no-hitter in 1962.

12 different managers have led the team during the franchise's 18 no-hitters. 15 different home plate umpires presided over the franchise's 18 no-hitters. Jason Varitek has caught the last 4 of the Red Sox's No-hitters, a Major League record for No-hitters caught by one catcher.

List of baseball parks in Boston

This is a list of venues used for professional baseball in Boston, Massachusetts. The information is a compilation of the information contained in the references listed.

South End Grounds

Occupant: Boston Red Stockings/Beaneaters/Braves – National Association (1871–1875) / National League (1876–1914 part)

Location: Walpole Street (southwest, home plate); railroad tracks (northwest, left field); Columbus Avenue (southeast, right field)

Currently: Parking lot between Northeastern University's Columbus Parking Garage and Ruggles Station of the Orange Line of the MBTADartmouth Street Grounds a.k.a. Union Athletic Grounds or Union Grounds

Occupant: Boston Reds/Unions – Union Association (1884)

Location: Huntington Avenue (to the north - home plate); Boston and Albany Railroad tracks (northeast - home plate and third base); Dartmouth Street (southeast - left and center fields); Boston and Providence Railroad tracks (south - center and right fields); Irvington Street (west, right field and third base - approximately corresponds to Yarmouth Street)

Currently: Copley PlaceCongress Street Grounds

Occupants:

Boston Reds – Players' League (1890) / American Association (1891)

Boston Beaneaters – NL (1894 part)

Location: Congress Street (south); Farnsworth Street (west)

Currently: Industrial, warehousesHuntington Avenue Grounds

Occupant: Boston Red Sox – American League (1901–1911)

Location: Huntington Avenue (northwest, left field); Rogers (now Forsyth) Street (southwest, third base); railroad tracks (southeast, first base); across the tracks to the north from South End Grounds

Currently: Solomon Court at Cabot Center on the campus of Northeastern UniversityBraves Field

Occupant: Boston Braves – NL (mid-1915–1952)

Location: Commonwealth Avenue (south, first base); Gaffney Street (east, right field); railroad tracks (north, left field); Babcock Street (west, third base)

Currently: Nickerson FieldFenway Park

Occupants:

Boston Red Sox – American League (1912–present)

Boston Braves – NL (1914 part – 1915 part)

Location: 4 Yawkey Way (24 Jersey Street) (southwest, third base); Brookline Avenue (northwest, left field corner); Lansdowne Street (north, left field); Ipswich Street (east, right field); Van Ness Street (southeast, first base)

South End Grounds

South End Grounds refers to any one of three baseball parks on one site in Boston, Massachusetts. They were home to the franchise that eventually became known as the Boston Braves, first in the National Association and later in the National League, from 1871 to 1914.

At least in its third edition, the formal name of the park -- as indicated by the sign over its entrance gate -- was Boston National League Base Ball Park. It was located on the northeast corner of Columbus Avenue and Walpole Street (now Saint Cyprian's Place), just southwest of Carter Playground. Accordingly, it was also known over the years as Walpole Street Grounds; two other names were Union Base-ball Grounds and Boston Baseball Grounds.

The ballpark was across the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad tracks, to the south, from the eventual site of the Huntington Avenue Grounds, home field of Boston's American League team prior to the building of Fenway Park.

The Boston club was initially known as the "Red Stockings," because four of its key players had come from the famous 1869–1870 barnstorming team known as the Cincinnati Red Stockings and took the nickname with them to Boston. Over time the team acquired other informal nicknames, such as "Beaneaters," "Red Caps," "Rustlers" and "Doves." This team eventually adopted the official nickname "Braves," just a few years before abandoning South End Grounds.

With its tight foul lines and expansive center field, like a scaled-down version of the Polo Grounds, it was sometimes said that the South End had no right or left field, only a center field.

South End Grounds was rebuilt twice during its lifetime, the first time by choice and the second time by necessity.

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