Hull number

Hull number is a serial identification number given to a boat or ship. For the military, a lower number implies an older vessel. For civilian use, the HIN is used to trace the boat's history. The precise usage varies by country and type.

USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) approach
The hull number visible on both sides of the bow of USS Arleigh Burke, DDG-51

United States usage

Civilian use

For civilian craft manufactured in the United States, the hull number is given to the vessel when it is built and forms part of the hull identification number, which uniquely identifies the vessel and must be permanently affixed to the hull in at least two places. A Hull Identification Number (HIN) is a unique set of 12 characters, similar to the Vehicle Identification Number which is found on automobiles. In 1972, The United States Coast Guard was asked to create a standardized format for HINs to allow for better tracking of accidents and history of boats. This HIN format is as follows: The first three characters consist of the Manufacturers Index Code (MIC)[1] and should only be letters. The following five characters are the unique serial number assigned by the Manufacturer, and can be a series of letters and/or numbers with the exception of the letters O, I, and Q (they can be easily mistaken). The last four characters determine the model and certification year of the boat.[2] The HIN may be found on the aft of the vessel in the uppermost right corner. Also, the HIN may be stated on the title, registration, and insurance documents.

United States military

The United States Navy, United States Coast Guard, and United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration employ hull numbers in conjunction with a hull classification symbol to uniquely identify vessels and to aid identification. A particular combination of hull classification and hull number is never reused and therefore provides a means to uniquely identify a particular ship. For example, there have been at least eight vessels named USS Enterprise, but CV-6 uniquely identifies the World War II aircraft carrier from all others. For convenience, the combined designation, which is painted on the sides of the hulls, is frequently called the "hull number".

The official Navy Style Guide says that hull numbers do not include hyphens.[3]

The U.S. Navy sometimes ignores the sequence of hull numbering. For example, the Navy built the last Los Angeles-class nuclear submarine as Cheyenne (SSN-773). Next the Navy built the three Seawolf-class submarines SSN-21 through SSN-23. Then the Navy later resumed the original sequence of hull numbers with USS Virginia (SSN-774) for its next class of nuclear attack submarines.

This change in numbering was done because the Seawolf class was to have a radical new and large design for the continuation of the Cold War into the 21st century, but cost overruns combined with the end of the Cold War, and the resulting reduction of the Navy's construction budget resulted in only three of these boats being constructed: Seawolf (SSN-21), Connecticut (SSN-22), and Jimmy Carter (SSN-23).

Also, whenever warships are constructed in American shipyards for foreign navies, any hull numbers used to identify the ships during their construction are never reused by the U.S. Navy. For example, the Perth-class guided missile destroyers that were built for the Royal Australian Navy in Bay City, Michigan were given the hull numbers DDG-25, DDG-26, and DDG-27; but these hull numbers were not assigned to any American destroyers after the Australian Navy had changed those to its own identification numbers.[4]

Several other new warships have been constructed in American shipyards for countries such as West Germany and Taiwan. Guided-missile frigates were constructed in Portugal under military-assistance aid packages were given the hull numbers DEG 7 through 11.

When a naval vessel is modified for use as a different type of ship, it is often assigned a new hull number along with its new classification. Often the actual number remains the same while the hull classification changes. For example, a heavy cruiser (CA) that was converted into a guided missile cruiser became a CG and its number was changed. This happened with Albany (CA-123), Chicago (CA-136), and Columbus (CA-74), which became, respectively, CG-10, CG-11, and CG-12.

Also, during World War II, nine Cleveland-class light cruisers (CL) were converted to light aircraft carriers (CVL), with different numbers.

During the 1970s, the guided missile frigates that were then redesignated as guided missile cruisers had their designations changed from DLG to CG; in this case, they kept their previous numbers. Some other guided-missile frigates were redesignated as guided missile destroyers (DDG) and given new numbers.

Hull numbers have been used to identify armored tanks for the U.S. Army and the U.S. Marine Corps, and other military services, also.

European usage

In Europe, ships are given a Craft Identification Number (CIN) or Hull Identification Number (HIN), standardised as EN ISO 10087:2006. The numbers are a permanent, unique, fourteen-digit alphanumeric identifier issued to all marine vessels in Europe. The numbering system is mandated by the European Recreational Craft Directive and descended from the American system. Larger vessels over 300 gross tons also receive a permanent international IMO ship identification number, and European vessels over 20 metres receive a permanent ENI number.

An example CID/HIN might appear as "GB-ABC00042-A8-99", where "GB" is the ISO 3166-1 country code, "ABC" would be the Acme Boat Company's Manufacturer Identity Code (MIC); "00042" would be the forty-second hull constructed by the organisation; "A8" would be January 1998 for the date keel was laid to the nearest month and "99" denoted as the year 1999 as the particular model year.[5] Months are denoted from A…L for January…December.

In the United Kingdom, the British Marine Federation manage the issuing of Manufacturer Identity Code on behalf of the British Department for Business Innovation and Skills.[5] Amateur boat builders in the United Kingdom may apply for one-off HIN from the Royal Yacht Association who will issue one number from their "GB-RYAxxxxx" range.[5]

Russia

KamAZ military tank transporter
Russian SU-85 with a hull number 222

The hull number in Russian is known as bortovoi nomer. During the 2014 Russian invasion of Ukraine all hull numbers were painted over in order to conceal presence of the Russian regular army troops in Ukraine.

See also

References

  1. ^ "US Coast Guard MIC Database". Archived from the original on 4 October 2012. Retrieved 25 September 2012.
  2. ^ "Nautical Knowhow HIN Source". Archived from the original on 2012-10-06.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-06-06. Retrieved 2015-04-04.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Andrew, Gordon (September 2010). "AWD, Hobart, MFU or DDGH – What's in a name?". Semaphore. Sea Power Centre-Australia. 2010 (07). Archived from the original on 12 March 2011. Retrieved 6 December 2011.
  5. ^ a b c British Marine Federation. "Craft Identification Number". British Marine Federation website. Archived from the original on 27 March 2013. Retrieved 18 September 2013.
120 ton-class repair dry dock

120-ton class dry dock is a class of naval auxiliary ship in service with the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN). Only a single unit was completed with hull number 809, and it was originally given the name 809 Floating dock after the hull number. However, the pennant number and its name may have been changed due to the change of Chinese naval ships naming convention.

Designed in Shanghai by Shenjia Shipyard (申佳船厂), also known as the 4805th Factory of PLAN in Shanghai in the mid-1960s, construction begun at the same shipyard in 1967 after design was completed, during the greatest political turmoil in China at the time, namely, Cultural Revolution. The result was the delay of the program, with the launching of the vessel did not commence until approximately three years later on June 27, 1970. The program suffered another serious blow approximately two months after the launching on August 31, 1970, when copper workers operated against the regulation by opening the valve, resulting in the sinking of the vessel. The salvage and repair cost totaled ¥120,000 and delayed the program further for two more months, with sea trials finally conducted in October 1970. The dry dock was finally completed and handed over to PLAN in 1971 for naval base in Fujian.

Crosley-class high speed transport

Crosley-class high speed transports were high speed transport ships that served in the United States Navy during World War II. Some stayed in commission long enough to serve in the Korean War and the Vietnam War. All of them were converted from Rudderow-class destroyer escorts during construction except for USS Bray (APD-139), which was converted a year after her construction. After World War II ended, several of the ships were sold to Mexico, South Korea, Taiwan, and Colombia.

Today, ARC Cordoba (DT-15), formerly USS Ruchamkin (APD-89) is the only surviving member of the class, preserved as a museum ship in Tocancipa, Colombia.

General Dynamics Electric Boat

General Dynamics Electric Boat (GDEB) is a subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation. It has been the primary builder of submarines for the United States Navy for more than 100 years. The company's main facilities are a shipyard in Groton, Connecticut, a hull-fabrication and outfitting facility in Quonset Point, Rhode Island, and a design and engineering facility in New London, Connecticut.

Grand Princess

Grand Princess is a Grand-class cruise ship owned by Princess Cruises. Built in 1998 by Fincantieri Cantieri Navali Italiani in Monfalcone, Italy, with hull number 5956, at a cost of approximately US$450 million. She was the largest and most expensive passenger ship ever built at the time. Grand Princess was the flagship in the Princess Cruises fleet until the new Royal Princess took that title in June 2013.

Hull classification symbol

The United States Navy, United States Coast Guard, and United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) use a hull classification symbol (sometimes called hull code or hull number) to identify their ships by type and by individual ship within a type. The system is analogous to the pennant number system that the Royal Navy and other European and Commonwealth navies use.

List of Liberty ships

This is a list of Liberty ships, a type of mass-produced cargo ships built to meet inexpensively the United States' World War II maritime transport needs.

Because of the large number of entries, the list has been divided into five sections by the first letter of the ship's name:

List of Liberty ships: A-F

List of Liberty ships: G-Je

List of Liberty ships: Je-L

List of Liberty ships: M-R

List of Liberty ships: S-ZNote: These are sortable lists, which also allows ships to be looked up by Hull number.

List of aircraft carriers of the United States Navy

Aircraft carriers are warships that act as airbases for carrier-based aircraft. In the United States Navy, these consist of ships commissioned with hull classification symbols CV (aircraft carrier), CVA (attack aircraft carrier), CVB (large aircraft carrier), CVL (light aircraft carrier), CVN (aircraft carrier (nuclear propulsion)) and CVAN (attack aircraft carrier (nuclear propulsion)). Beginning with the Forrestal-class, (CV-59 to present) all carriers commissioned into service are classified as supercarriers. The United States Navy has also used escort aircraft carriers and airship aircraft carriers. This list does not include various amphibious warfare ships which can operate as carriers.

The first aircraft carrier commissioned into the United States Navy was USS Langley (CV-1) on 20 March 1922. The Langley was a converted Proteus-class collier (originally commissioned as USS Jupiter (AC-3), Langley was soon followed by the Lexington-class, USS Ranger (the first purpose-built carriers in the American fleet), the Yorktown-class, and USS Wasp. These classes made up the entirety of the United States carrier fleet active prior to the Second World War.With World War II looming, two more classes of carriers were commissioned under President Franklin Roosevelt: the Essex-class, which are informally divided into regular bow and extended bow sub-classes, and the Independence-class, which are classified as light aircraft carriers. Between these two classes, 35 ships were created. During this time, the Navy also purchased two training vessels, USS Wolverine and USS Sable.The Cold War led to multiple developments in the United States' carrier fleet, starting with the addition of the Midway-class and the Saipan-class. One more class in the start of the Cold War, the United States-class, was canceled due to the Truman administration's policy of shrinking the United States Navy and in particular, the Navy's air assets. The policy was eventually revised after a public outcry and Congressional hearings sparked by the Revolt of the Admirals.Later in the Cold War era, the first of the classes dubbed "supercarriers" was born, starting with USS Forrestal (CV-59), followed by the Kitty Hawk-class and single ships Enterprise (CVN-65), the first nuclear powered carrier and John F. Kennedy (CV-67), the last conventionally powered carrier. These were then followed by the Nimitz-class and the post-cold war Gerald R. Ford-class nuclear supercarriers, the only classes that are currently in active-duty service. The ten-ship Nimitz-class is complete, while USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78), the lead ship of her planned ten-ship class, is the only ship active so far, with construction started on two more ships, John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) and Enterprise (CVN-80).

List of destroyers of the Swedish Navy

This is a list of Swedish destroyers commissioned between 1902 and 1959. The Swedish Navy has once re-numbered all its destroyers. Some ships were assigned hull numbers, which were later changed. Other ships have generally been issued a number, but never wore it. Some destroyers of the Göteborg and Visby classes were rebuilt between 1966–68 and were reclassified as frigates, changing their hull numbers from J to F. No ship has ever had the hull number J15.

List of destroyers of the United States Navy

This is a list of destroyers of the United States Navy, sorted by hull number. It includes all of the series DD, DL, DDG, DLG, and DLGN.

CG-47 Ticonderoga and CG-48 Yorktown were approved as destroyers (DDG-47 and DDG-48) and redesignated cruisers before being laid down; it is uncertain whether CG-49 Vincennes and CG-50 Valley Forge were ever authorized as destroyers by the United States Congress (though the fact that the DDG sequence resumes with DDG-51 Arleigh Burke argues that they were).

SS Albert M. Boe

SS Albert M. Boe was a Liberty ship laid down on 11 July 1945 at the East Yard of New England Shipbuilding Corporation in Portland, Maine, as a boxed aircraft transport. The ship is notable as the final liberty ship built. She was named after Chief Engineer Albert M. Boe who remained in the engine room acting to control the spread of fire, despite fatal burns, when an engine of the aircraft repair vessel U.S. Army FS-214 exploded. He is credited with saving the lives of other crew members by that action and received the posthumous Merchant Marine Distinguished Service Medal.Albert M. Boe was assigned hull number 3132 by the U.S. Maritime Commission (USMC) and was launched on 26 September 1945 (Engine Builder: Filer & Stowell Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin); delivered to the US Army and on 30 October 1945 was commissioned USAT Albert M. Boe.

On 1 March 1950, she was decommissioned by the US Army and acquired by US Navy as USNS Albert M. Boe (T-AKV-6). On 12 January 1953, she was removed from service, and on 22 January was transferred to the Marine Corps. On 11 March 1954, she was struck from the Naval Register. In 1964, she was sold for commercial service, converted for use as a fish cannery ship, and renamed Star of Kodiak. Though currently landlocked, Star of Kodiak is still in use as the home of Trident Seafoods.

SS Canada Victory

The SS Canada Victory was one of 531 Victory ships built during World War II under the Emergency Shipbuilding program. She was launched by the Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation on January 12, 1944, and was completed on February 28, 1944. The ship’s United States Maritime Commission designation was VC2-S-AP3, hull number 93 (1009). The Maritime Commission turned her over to a civilian contractor, the Alaska SS Company, for operation.

SS George Calvert (MC Hull 29)

Note: The USAS American Mariner, originally commissioned as the SS George Calvert (build number 2007/MC Hull 20) should not be confused with the SS George Calvert (build number 2016/MC Hull 29) which was constructed shortly thereafter.SS George Calvert was a Liberty ship, Maritime Commission hull number 29, built by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation at the Bethlehem-Fairfield Yard in Baltimore, Maryland, and launched on 14 March 1942.The ship served as a freighter to carry goods during World War II. She was sunk in May 1942 by a torpedo launched from a German submarine near Cuba.

Ship class

A ship class is a group of ships of a similar design. This is distinct from a ship type, which might reflect a similarity of tonnage or intended use. For example, USS Carl Vinson is a nuclear aircraft carrier (ship type) of the Nimitz class (ship class).

In the course of building a class of ships, design changes might be implemented. In such a case, the ships of different design might not be considered of the same class; each variation would either be its own class, or a subclass of the original class (see County-class cruiser for an example). If ships are built of a class whose production had been discontinued, a similar distinction might be made.

Ships in a class often have names linked by a common factor: e.g. Trafalgar-class submarines' names all begin with T (Turbulent, Tireless, Torbay); and Ticonderoga-class cruisers are named after American battles (Yorktown, Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, Anzio). Ships of the same class may be referred to as sister ships.

USNS Neptune (ARC-2)

USNS Neptune (ARC-2), was the lead ship in her class of cable repair ships in U.S. Naval service. The ship was built by Pusey & Jones Corp. of Wilmington, Delaware, Hull Number 1108, as the USACS William H. G. Bullard named for Rear Adm. William H. G. Bullard. She was the first of two Maritime Commission type S3-S2-BP1 ships built for the US Army near the end of World War II. The other ship was the Albert J. Myer, which later joined her sister ship in naval service as the USNS Albert J. Myer. The ship was built by Pusey & Jones Corp. of Wilmington, Delaware as Hull Number 1108.

USS Lorain (PF-97)

USS Lorain (PF-97) was a United States Navy Tacoma-class frigate authorized for construction during World War II but cancelled before construction could begin.

Lorain originally was authorized as a patrol gunboat named USS Vallejo with the hull number PG-205, but she was redesignated as a patrol frigate with the hull number PF-97 on 15 April 1943. She was renamed USS Lorain on 19 November 1943.

Plans called for Lorain to be built under a Maritime Commission contract by the American Shipbuilding Company at Lorain, Ohio, as a Maritime Commission Type T. S2-S2-AQ1 hull. However, the contract for her construction for the U.S. Navy was cancelled on 11 February 1944 prior to the laying of her keel.

On 7 February 1944, four days before Lorain's cancellation, her incomplete sister ship, the Tacoma-class patrol frigate USS Roanoke (PF-93) was renamed USS Lorain (PF-93).

USS Macon (PF-96)

USS Macon (PF-96) was a United States Navy Tacoma-class frigate authorized for construction during World War II but cancelled before construction could begin.

Macon originally was authorized as a patrol gunboat with the hull number PG-204, but she was redesignated as a patrol frigate with the hull number PF-96 on 15 April 1943. She was assigned the name Macon on 30 August 1943.

Plans called for Macon to be built under a Maritime Commission contract by the American Shipbuilding Company at Lorain, Ohio, as a Maritime Commission Type T. S2-S2-AQ1 hull. However, the contract for her construction for the U.S. Navy was cancelled on 31 December 1943 prior to the laying of her keel.

USS Milledgeville (PF-98)

USS Milledgeville (PF-98) was a United States Navy Tacoma-class frigate authorized for construction during World War II but cancelled before construction could begin.

Milledgeville originally was authorized as a patrol gunboat with the hull number PG-206, but she was redesignated as a patrol frigate with the hull number PF-98 on 15 April 1943.

Plans called for Milledgeville to be built under a Maritime Commission contract by the American Shipbuilding Company at Lorain, Ohio, as a Maritime Commission Type T. S2-S2-AQ1 hull. However, the contract for her construction for the U.S. Navy was cancelled on 31 December 1943 prior to the laying of her keel.

On 7 February 1944, the cancelled Milledgeville's incomplete sister ship, the Tacoma-class patrol frigate USS Sitka (PF-94) was renamed USS Milledgeville (PF-94).

USS Stamford (PF-95)

USS Stamford (PF-95) was a United States Navy Tacoma-class frigate authorized for construction during World War II but cancelled before construction could begin.

Stamford originally was authorized as a patrol gunboat with the hull number PG-203, but she was redesignated as a patrol frigate with the hull number PF-95 on 15 April 1943. She was assigned the name Stamford on 30 August 1943.

Plans called for Stamford to be built under a Maritime Commission contract by the American Shipbuilding Company at Lorain, Ohio, as a Maritime Commission Type T. S2-S2-AQ1 hull. However, the contract for her construction for the U.S. Navy was cancelled on 31 December 1943 prior to the laying of her keel.

United States lightship Chesapeake (LV-116)

United States lightship Chesapeake (LV-116/WAL-538/WLV-538) is a museum ship owned by the National Park Service and on a 25-year loan to Baltimore City, and is operated by Historic Ships in Baltimore, Maryland. A National Historic Landmark, she is one of a small number of preserved lightships. Since 1820, several lightships have served at the Chesapeake lightship station and have been called Chesapeake. It was common for a lightship to be reassigned from one Lightship Station to another and thus "renamed" and identified by its new station name. Even though the "name" changed during a Lightship's service life, the hull number never changed. The United States Coast Guard assigned new hull numbers to all lightships still in service in April 1950. After that date, Light Ship / Light Vessel 116 was then known by the new Coast Guard Hull number: WAL-538. In January 1965 the Coast Guard further modified all lightship hull designations from WAL to WLV, so Chesapeake became WLV-538.

Chesapeake had many redundant systems in order to maintain her position through most storms. The 5,000 pounds (2,300 kg) main anchor was backed up by a second 5000-pound anchor attached to the side of the ship. The 30,000 candela main light was also backed up with a secondary lamp and the Radio Locator Beacon also had a backup system. On more than one occasion (in 1933, 1936, and 1962) the main anchor chain snapped during violent storms and the ship had to use her engines to stay in place and drop her second anchor.

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