Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award.[1] The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".[2][3] The Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine was given each year for professionally edited magazines related to science fiction or fantasy and which had published four or more issues with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year.[4] Awards are also given out for non-professional magazines in the fanzine category, and for semi-professional magazines in the semiprozine category.

The award was first presented in 1953, the first year any Hugo Award was given, and with the exception of 1954 was given annually through 1972 when it was retired in favor of the newly created professional editor category. For the 1957 awards, the category was split into American and British magazine categories, a distinction which was not repeated any other year. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given.[5] To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1946, 1951, and 1954, but only for the professional editor category, not the professional magazine category that would have existed at the time.[6]

Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with five nominees, except in the case of a tie. These five works on the ballot are the five most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. The 1953 through 1956 and 1958 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up magazines, but since 1959 all five candidates were recorded.[5] Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of five nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held.[7] Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year.[1][8]

During the nineteen nomination years, twelve magazines run by fifteen editors were nominated. Of these, only five magazines run by eight editors won. Astounding Science-Fiction/Analog Science Fact & Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction each won eight times, out of eighteen and fifteen nominations, respectively. If won three of five nominations, New Worlds won one of its six nominations—though its win was in the 1957 "British Professional Magazine" category—and Galaxy Science Fiction won only one out of its fifteen nominations, for the first award in 1953. Of the magazines which never won, Amazing Stories was nominated the most at eight times, while the only other magazine to be nominated more than twice was Science Fantasy with three nominations. John W. Campbell, Jr. received both the most nominations and awards, as he edited Analog Science Fact & Fiction for all eighteen nominations and eight wins. Edward L. Ferman and Robert P. Mills both won four times, while Frederik Pohl won three. H. L. Gold received the second most number of nominations at twelve, while Cele Goldsmith received the most number of nominations without winning at ten for her work on two separate magazines; she was the only female editor to be nominated.

Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine
Awarded forThe best professional magazine devoted primarily to science fiction or fantasy
Presented byWorld Science Fiction Society
First awarded1953
Last awarded1972
Websitethehugoawards.org

Winners and nominees

In the following table, the years correspond to the date of the ceremony, rather than when the work was first published. Each date links to the "year in literature" article corresponding with when the work was eligible. Entries with a blue background and an asterisk (*) next to the work's name have won the award; those with a white background are the nominees on the short-list. For 1957, when the awards were split into a "Best Professional American Magazine" and "Best Professional British Magazine", the year column is marked as to which category the works were entered in. Note that Astounding Science-Fiction and Analog Science Fact & Fiction are the same magazine; no other nominated magazine underwent a name change during the period the award was active.[9]

  *   Winners and joint winners

Year Work Editor(s) Ref.
1953 Astounding Science-Fiction* John W. Campbell, Jr. [10]
Galaxy Science Fiction* H. L. Gold [10]
1955 Astounding Science-Fiction* John W. Campbell, Jr. [11]
1956 Astounding Science-Fiction* John W. Campbell, Jr. [12]
1957
(American)
Astounding Science-Fiction* John W. Campbell, Jr. [13]
The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Anthony Boucher [13]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [13]
Infinity Science Fiction Larry T. Shaw [13]
1957
(British)
New Worlds* Michael Moorcock [13]
Nebula Science Fiction Peter F. Hamilton [13]
1958 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction* Anthony Boucher and Robert P. Mills [14]
1959 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction* Anthony Boucher and Robert P. Mills [15]
Astounding Science-Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [15]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [15]
Infinity Science Fiction Larry T. Shaw [15]
New Worlds Michael Moorcock [15]
1960 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction* Robert P. Mills [16]
Amazing Stories Cele Goldsmith [16]
Astounding Science-Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [16]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [16]
Fantastic Universe Hans Stefan Santesson [16]
1961 Analog Science Fact & Fiction* John W. Campbell, Jr. [17]
Amazing Stories Cele Goldsmith [17]
The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Robert P. Mills [17]
1962 Analog Science Fact & Fiction* John W. Campbell, Jr. [18]
Amazing Stories Cele Goldsmith [18]
The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [18]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [18]
Science Fantasy John Carnell [18]
1963 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction* Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [19]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [19]
Fantastic Cele Goldsmith [19]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [19]
Science Fantasy John Carnell [19]
1964 Analog Science Fact & Fiction* John W. Campbell, Jr. [20]
Amazing Stories Cele Goldsmith [20]
The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [20]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [20]
Science Fantasy John Carnell [20]
1965 Analog Science Fact & Fiction* John W. Campbell, Jr. [21]
The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [21]
Galaxy Science Fiction Frederik Pohl [21]
If Frederik Pohl [21]
1966 If* Frederik Pohl [22]
Amazing Stories Cele Goldsmith [22]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [22]
The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [22]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [22]
1967 If* Frederik Pohl [23]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [23]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [23]
New Worlds Michael Moorcock [23]
1968 If* Frederik Pohl [24]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [24]
The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Edward L. Ferman [24]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [24]
New Worlds Michael Moorcock [24]
1969 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction* Edward L. Ferman [25]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [25]
Galaxy Science Fiction H. L. Gold [25]
If Frederik Pohl [25]
New Worlds Michael Moorcock [25]
1970 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction* Edward L. Ferman [26]
Amazing Stories Cele Goldsmith [26]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [26]
Galaxy Science Fiction Ejler Jakobsson [26]
New Worlds Michael Moorcock [26]
1971 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction* Edward L. Ferman [27]
Amazing Stories Cele Goldsmith [27]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [27]
Galaxy Science Fiction Ejler Jakobsson [27]
Visions of Tomorrow Ron Graham [27]
1972 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction* Edward L. Ferman [28]
Amazing Stories Cele Goldsmith [28]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction John W. Campbell, Jr. [28]
Fantastic Cele Goldsmith [28]
Galaxy Science Fiction Ejler Jakobsson [28]

References

  1. ^ a b "The Locus index to SF Awards: About the Hugo Awards". Locus. Oakland, California: Locus. Archived from the original on 2010-01-03. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  2. ^ Jordison, Sam (2008-08-07). "An International Contest We Can Win". The Guardian. London, England: The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2009-07-29. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  3. ^ Cleaver, Emily (2010-04-20). "Hugo Awards Announced". Litro Magazine. London, England: Ocean Media. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  4. ^ "The World Science Fiction Society Rules 1971". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-05-19.
  5. ^ a b "The Hugo Awards: FAQ". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-20.
  6. ^ "The Locus index to SF Awards: About the Retro Hugo Awards". Locus. Oakland, California: Locus. Archived from the original on 2010-01-03. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  7. ^ "The Hugo Awards: Introduction". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-20.
  8. ^ "World Science Fiction Society / Worldcon". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2009-04-14. Retrieved 2010-04-20.
  9. ^ Nicholls, Peter, ed. (1981). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. Frogmore: Granada Publishing. ISBN 0-586-05380-8.
  10. ^ a b "1953 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  11. ^ "1955 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  12. ^ "1956 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  13. ^ a b c d e f "1957 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  14. ^ "1958 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  15. ^ a b c d e "1959 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  16. ^ a b c d e "1960 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  17. ^ a b c "1961 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  18. ^ a b c d e "1962 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  19. ^ a b c d e "1963 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  20. ^ a b c d e "1964 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  21. ^ a b c d "1965 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  22. ^ a b c d e "1966 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  23. ^ a b c d "1967 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  24. ^ a b c d e "1968 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  25. ^ a b c d e "1969 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  26. ^ a b c d e "1970 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  27. ^ a b c d e "1971 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  28. ^ a b c d e "1972 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.

External links

Analog Science Fiction and Fact

Analog Science Fiction and Fact is an American science-fiction magazine published under various titles since 1930. Originally titled Astounding Stories of Super-Science, the first issue was dated January 1930, published by William Clayton, and edited by Harry Bates. Clayton went bankrupt in 1933 and the magazine was sold to Street & Smith. The new editor was F. Orlin Tremaine, who soon made Astounding the leading magazine in the nascent pulp science fiction field, publishing well-regarded stories such as Jack Williamson's Legion of Space and John W. Campbell's "Twilight". At the end of 1937, Campbell took over editorial duties under Tremaine's supervision, and the following year Tremaine was let go, giving Campbell more independence. Over the next few years Campbell published many stories that became classics in the field, including Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, A.E. van Vogt's Slan, and several novels and stories by Robert A. Heinlein. The period beginning with Campbell's editorship is often referred to as the Golden Age of Science Fiction.

By 1950, new competition had appeared from Galaxy Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Campbell's interest in some pseudo-science topics, such as dianetics (an early version of scientology), alienated some of his regular writers, and Astounding was no longer regarded as the leader of the field, though it did continue to publish popular and influential stories: Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity appeared in 1953, and Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" appeared the following year. In 1960, Campbell changed the title of the magazine to Analog Science Fiction & Fact; he had long wanted to get rid of the word "Astounding" in the title, which he felt was too sensational. At about the same time Street & Smith sold the magazine to Condé Nast. Campbell remained as editor until his death in 1971.

Ben Bova took over from 1972 to 1978, and the character of the magazine changed noticeably, since Bova was willing to publish fiction that included sexual content and profanity. Bova published stories such as Frederik Pohl's "The Gold at the Starbow's End", which was nominated for both a Hugo and Nebula Award, and Joe Haldeman's "Hero", the first story in the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning "Forever War" sequence; Pohl had been unable to sell to Campbell, and "Hero" had been rejected by Campbell as unsuitable for the magazine. Bova won five consecutive Hugo Awards for his editing of Analog.

Bova was followed by Stanley Schmidt, who continued to publish many of the same authors who had been contributing for years; the result was some criticism of the magazine as stagnant and dull, though Schmidt was initially successful in maintaining circulation. The title was sold to Davis Publications in 1980, then to Dell Magazines in 1992. Crosstown Publications acquired Dell in 1996 and remains the publisher. Schmidt continued to edit the magazine until 2012, when he was replaced by Trevor Quachri.

Anthony Boucher

Anthony Boucher (; born William Anthony Parker White; August 21, 1911 – April 29, 1968) was an American author, critic, and editor, who wrote several classic mystery novels, short stories, science fiction, and radio dramas. Between 1942 and 1947 he acted as reviewer of mostly mystery fiction for the San Francisco Chronicle. In addition to "Anthony Boucher", White also employed the pseudonym "H. H. Holmes", which was the pseudonym of a late-19th-century American serial killer; Boucher would also write light verse and sign it "Herman W. Mudgett" (another of the murderer's aliases).

In a 1981 poll of 17 detective story writers and reviewers, his novel Nine Times Nine was voted as the ninth best locked room mystery of all time.

Frederik Pohl

Frederik George Pohl Jr. (; November 26, 1919 – September 2, 2013) was an American science-fiction writer, editor, and fan, with a career spanning more than 75 years—from his first published work, the 1937 poem "Elegy to a Dead Satellite: Luna", to the 2011 novel All the Lives He Led and articles and essays published in 2012.From about 1959 until 1969, Pohl edited Galaxy and its sister magazine If; the latter won three successive annual Hugo Awards as the year's best professional magazine. His 1977 novel Gateway won four "year's best novel" awards: the Hugo voted by convention participants, the Locus voted by magazine subscribers, the Nebula voted by American science-fiction writers, and the juried academic John W. Campbell Memorial Award. He won the Campbell Memorial Award again for the 1984 collection of novellas Years of the City, one of two repeat winners during the first 40 years. For his 1979 novel Jem, Pohl won a U.S. National Book Award in the one-year category Science Fiction. It was a finalist for three other year's best novel awards. He won four Hugo and three Nebula Awards.The Science Fiction Writers of America named Pohl its 12th recipient of the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award in 1993 and he was inducted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 1998, its third class of two dead and two living writers.Pohl won the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer in 2010, for his blog, "The Way the Future Blogs".

If (magazine)

If was an American science-fiction magazine launched in March 1952 by Quinn Publications, owned by James L. Quinn.

The magazine was moderately successful, though for most of its run it was not considered to be in the first tier of science-fiction magazines. It achieved its greatest success under editor Frederik Pohl, winning the Hugo Award for best professional magazine three years running from 1966 to 1968. If published many award-winning stories over its 22 years, including Robert A. Heinlein's novel The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress and Harlan Ellison's short story "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream". The most prominent writer to make his first sale to If was Larry Niven, whose story "The Coldest Place" appeared in the December 1964 issue.

If was merged into Galaxy Science Fiction after the December 1974 issue, its 175th issue overall.

John W. Campbell

John Wood Campbell Jr. (June 8, 1910 – July 11, 1971) was an American science fiction writer and editor. He was editor of Astounding Science Fiction (later called Analog Science Fiction and Fact) from late 1937 until his death and was part of the Golden Age of Science Fiction. Campbell wrote super-science space opera under his own name and stories under his primary pseudonym, Don A. Stuart. Campbell also used the pen names Karl Van Kampen and Arthur McCann. His novella "Who Goes There?" was adapted as the films The Thing from Another World (1951), The Thing (1982), and The Thing (2011).

Campbell began writing science fiction at age 18 while attending MIT. He published six short stories, one novel, and six letters in the science fiction magazine Amazing Stories from 1930 to 1931. This work established Campbell's reputation as a writer of space adventure. When in 1934 he began to write stories with a different tone, he wrote as Don A. Stuart. From 1930 until the later part of that decade, Campbell was prolific and successful under both names, though he stopped writing fiction shortly after he became editor of Astounding in 1937.

It is as editor of Astounding Science Fiction (later called Analog Science Fiction and Fact) from late 1937 until his death for which Campbell is primarily remembered today. As well, in 1939, Campbell started the fantasy magazine Unknown, although it was canceled after only four years. Referring to his time spent as an editor, The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction wrote: "More than any other individual, he helped to shape modern sf." Isaac Asimov called Campbell "the most powerful force in science fiction ever" and said the "first ten years of his editorship he dominated the field completely." In his capacity as an editor, Campbell published some of the very earliest work, and helped shape the careers, of virtually every important sf author to debut between 1938 and 1946, including Robert A. Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, Isaac Asimov, and Arthur C. Clarke.

An increasingly strong interest in pseudoscience later alienated Campbell from many of the writers whose careers he had nurtured; Heinlein, Sturgeon, Asimov, and Clarke rarely worked with him after about 1950. As well, beginning in the 1960s, Campbell's controversial essays supporting segregation, and other remarks and writings surrounding slavery and race, served to distance him from many in the science fiction community. Nevertheless, Campbell remained an important figure in science fiction publishing up until his death. Campbell and Astounding shared one of the inaugural Hugo Awards with H. L. Gold and Galaxy at the 1953 World Science Fiction Convention. Subsequently, Campbell and Astounding (later renamed Analog) won the Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine seven times.

Shortly after his death in 1971, the University of Kansas science fiction program established the annual John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel and also renamed after him its annual Campbell Conference. The World Science Fiction Society established the annual John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. The Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame inducted Campbell in 1996, in its inaugural class of two deceased and two living persons.

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