Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award.[1] The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".[2][3] The Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist is given each year for artists of works related to science fiction or fantasy released in the previous calendar year.[4]

The Professional Artist award has been given annually under several names since 1955, with the exception of 1957. The inaugural 1953 Hugo awards recognized "Best Interior Illustrator" and "Best Cover Artist" categories, awarded to Virgil Finlay and a tie between Hannes Bok and Ed Emshwiller, respectively. The Best Professional Artist award was simply named "Best Artist" in 1955 and 1956, was not awarded in 1957, and was named "Outstanding Artist" in 1958, finally changing to its current name the following year.[5] Beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given.[6] To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954, and in each case an award for professional artist was given.[7]

Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated.[6] The awards in 1955 and 1958 did not include any recognition of runner-up artists, but since 1959 all six candidates have been recorded.[6] Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held.[8] Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations.[9] Worldcons are generally held near Labor Day, and in a different city around the world each year.[1][10]

During the 69 nomination years, 79 artists have been nominated; 23 of these have won, including co-winners and Retro Hugos. Michael Whelan has received the most awards, with 13 wins out of 24 nominations. Frank Kelly Freas has 11 wins and 28 nominations, the most nominations of any artist. Other artists with large numbers of wins or nominations include Bob Eggleton with 8 wins out of 23 nominations, Virgil Finlay with 4 out of 13, Ed Emshwiller with 4 out of 9, and Don Maitz with 2 out of 17. David A. Cherry and Thomas Canty are tied for the most nominations without an award at 10 each.

Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist
Awarded forThe best artist of works devoted primarily to science fiction or fantasy
Presented byWorld Science Fiction Society
First awarded1953
Most recent winnerSana Takeda
Websitethehugoawards.org

Winners and nominees

In the following tables, the years correspond to the date of the ceremony. Artists are eligible based on their work of the previous calendar year. Entries with a blue background and an asterisk (*) next to the artist's name have won the award; those with a white background are the nominees on the short-list.

  *   Winners

Year Artist(s) Ref.
1955 Frank Kelly Freas* [11]
1956 Frank Kelly Freas* [12]
Chesley Bonestell [12]
Ed Emshwiller [12]
Virgil Finlay [12]
Mel Hunter [12]
Edward Valigursky [12]
1958 Frank Kelly Freas* [13]
1959 Frank Kelly Freas* [14]
Ed Emshwiller [14]
Virgil Finlay [14]
H. R. Van Dongen [14]
Wally Wood [14]
1960 Ed Emshwiller* [15]
Virgil Finlay [15]
Frank Kelly Freas [15]
Mel Hunter [15]
Wally Wood [15]
1961 Ed Emshwiller* [16]
Virgil Finlay [16]
Frank Kelly Freas [16]
Mel Hunter [16]
1962 Ed Emshwiller* [17]
Virgil Finlay [17]
Mel Hunter [17]
John Schoenherr [17]
Alex Schomburg [17]
1963 Roy Krenkel* [18]
Ed Emshwiller [18]
Virgil Finlay [18]
Jack Gaughan [18]
John Schoenherr [18]
1964 Ed Emshwiller* [19]
Virgil Finlay [19]
Frank Frazetta [19]
Roy Krenkel [19]
John Schoenherr [19]
1965 John Schoenherr* [20]
Ed Emshwiller [20]
Frank Frazetta [20]
Jack Gaughan [20]
1966 Frank Frazetta* [21]
Frank Kelly Freas [21]
Jack Gaughan [21]
Gray Morrow [21]
John Schoenherr [21]
1967 Jack Gaughan* [22]
Frank Kelly Freas [22]
Gray Morrow [22]
John Schoenherr [22]
1968 Jack Gaughan* [23]
Chesley Bonestell [23]
Frank Frazetta [23]
Frank Kelly Freas [23]
Gray Morrow [23]
John Schoenherr [23]
1969 Jack Gaughan* [24]
Vaughn Bodé [24]
Leo Dillon and Diane Dillon [24]
Frank Kelly Freas [24]
1970 Frank Kelly Freas* [25]
Leo Dillon and Diane Dillon [25]
Jack Gaughan [25]
Eddie Jones [25]
Jeff Jones [25]
1971 Leo Dillon and Diane Dillon* [26]
Frank Kelly Freas [26]
Jack Gaughan [26]
Eddie Jones [26]
Jeff Jones [26]
1972 Frank Kelly Freas* [27]
Vincent Di Fate [27]
Jack Gaughan [27]
Jeff Jones [27]
John Schoenherr [27]
1973 Frank Kelly Freas* [28]
Vincent Di Fate [28]
Jack Gaughan [28]
Mike Hinge [28]
John Schoenherr [28]
1974 Frank Kelly Freas* [29]
Vincent Di Fate [29]
Frank Frazetta [29]
Jack Gaughan [29]
John Schoenherr [29]
1975 Frank Kelly Freas* [30]
Stephen Fabian [30]
Tim Kirk [30]
John Schoenherr [30]
Rick Sternbach [30]
1976 Frank Kelly Freas* [31]
George Barr [31]
Vincent Di Fate [31]
Stephen Fabian [31]
Rick Sternbach [31]
1977 Rick Sternbach* [32]
George Barr [32]
Vincent Di Fate [32]
Stephen Fabian [32]
1978 Rick Sternbach* [33]
Vincent Di Fate [33]
Stephen Fabian [33]
Frank Kelly Freas [33]
Michael Whelan [33]
1979 Vincent Di Fate* [34]
Stephen Fabian [34]
David A. Hardy [34]
Boris Vallejo [34]
Michael Whelan [34]
1980 Michael Whelan* [35]
Vincent Di Fate [35]
Stephen Fabian [35]
Paul Lehr [35]
Boris Vallejo [35]
1981 Michael Whelan* [36]
Vincent Di Fate [36]
Stephen Fabian [36]
Paul Lehr [36]
Don Maitz [36]
1982 Michael Whelan* [37]
Vincent Di Fate [37]
Carl Lundgren [37]
Don Maitz [37]
Rowena Morrill [37]
1983 Michael Whelan* [38]
Frank Kelly Freas [38]
Don Maitz [38]
Rowena Morrill [38]
Barclay Shaw [38]
Darrell K. Sweet [38]
1984 Michael Whelan* [39]
Val Lakey Lindahn [39]
Don Maitz [39]
Rowena Morrill [39]
Barclay Shaw [39]
1985 Michael Whelan* [40]
Vincent Di Fate [40]
Tom Kidd [40]
Val Lakey Lindahn [40]
Barclay Shaw [40]
1986 Michael Whelan* [41]
Frank Kelly Freas [41]
Don Maitz [41]
Rowena Morrill [41]
Barclay Shaw [41]
1987 Jim Burns* [42]
Frank Kelly Freas [42]
Tom Kidd [42]
Don Maitz [42]
J. K. Potter [42]
Barclay Shaw [42]
1988 Michael Whelan* [43]
David A. Cherry [43]
Bob Eggleton [43]
Tom Kidd [43]
Don Maitz [43]
J. K. Potter [43]
1989 Michael Whelan* [44]
Thomas Canty [44]
David A. Cherry [44]
Bob Eggleton [44]
Don Maitz [44]
Todd Cameron Hamilton [44]
1990 Don Maitz* [45]
Jim Burns [45]
Thomas Canty [45]
David A. Cherry [45]
James Gurney [45]
Tom Kidd [45]
Michael Whelan [45]
1991 Michael Whelan* [46]
Thomas Canty [46]
David A. Cherry [46]
Bob Eggleton [46]
Don Maitz [46]
1992 Michael Whelan* [47]
Thomas Canty [47]
David A. Cherry [47]
Bob Eggleton [47]
Don Maitz [47]
1993 Don Maitz* [48]
Thomas Canty [48]
David A. Cherry [48]
Bob Eggleton [48]
James Gurney [48]
1994 Bob Eggleton* [49]
Thomas Canty [49]
David A. Cherry [49]
Don Maitz [49]
Michael Whelan [49]
1995 Jim Burns* [50]
Thomas Canty [50]
Bob Eggleton [50]
Don Maitz [50]
Michael Whelan [50]
1996 Bob Eggleton* [51]
Jim Burns [51]
Thomas Canty [51]
Don Maitz [51]
Michael Whelan [51]
1997 Bob Eggleton* [52]
Thomas Canty [52]
David A. Cherry [52]
Don Maitz [52]
Michael Whelan [52]
1998 Bob Eggleton* [53]
Jim Burns [53]
Thomas Canty [53]
David A. Cherry [53]
Don Maitz [53]
Michael Whelan [53]
1999 Bob Eggleton* [54]
Jim Burns [54]
Donato Giancola [54]
Don Maitz [54]
Nick Stathopoulos [54]
Michael Whelan [54]
2000 Michael Whelan* [55]
Jim Burns [55]
Bob Eggleton [55]
Donato Giancola [55]
Don Maitz [55]
2001 Bob Eggleton* [56]
Jim Burns [56]
Frank Kelly Freas [56]
Donato Giancola [56]
Michael Whelan [56]
2002 Michael Whelan* [57]
Jim Burns [57]
Bob Eggleton [57]
Frank Kelly Freas [57]
Donato Giancola [57]
2003 Bob Eggleton* [58]
Jim Burns [58]
David A. Cherry [58]
Frank Kelly Freas [58]
Donato Giancola [58]
2004 Bob Eggleton* [59]
Jim Burns [59]
Frank Frazetta [59]
Frank Kelly Freas [59]
Donato Giancola [59]
2005 Jim Burns* [60]
Bob Eggleton [60]
Frank Kelly Freas [60]
Donato Giancola [60]
John Picacio [60]
2006 Donato Giancola* [61]
Jim Burns [61]
Bob Eggleton [61]
Stephan Martinière [61]
John Picacio [61]
Michael Whelan [61]
2007 Donato Giancola* [62]
Bob Eggleton [62]
Stephan Martinière [62]
John Jude Palencar [62]
John Picacio [62]
2008 Stephan Martinière* [63]
Phil Foglio [63]
John Harris [63]
John Picacio [63]
Shaun Tan [63]
2009 Donato Giancola* [64]
Daniel Dos Santos [64]
Bob Eggleton [64]
John Picacio [64]
Shaun Tan [64]
2010 Shaun Tan* [65]
Daniel Dos Santos [65]
Bob Eggleton [65]
Stephan Martinière [65]
John Picacio [65]
2011 Shaun Tan* [66]
Daniel Dos Santos [66]
Bob Eggleton [66]
Stephan Martinière [66]
John Picacio [66]
2012 John Picacio* [67]
Daniel Dos Santos [67]
Bob Eggleton [67]
Michael Komarck [67]
Stephan Martinière [67]
2013 John Picacio* [68]
Vincent Chong [68]
Julie Dillon [68]
Daniel Dos Santos [68]
Christian McGrath [68]
2014 Julie Dillon* [69]
Galen Dara [69]
Daniel Dos Santos [69]
John Harris [69]
John Picacio [69]
Fiona Staples [69]
2015 Julie Dillon* [70]
Kirk DouPonce [70]
Nick Greenwood [70]
Alan Pollack [70]
Carter Reid [70]
2016 Abigail Larson* [71]
Lars Braad Andersen [71]
Larry Elmore [71]
Michal Karcz [71]
Larry Rostant [71]
2017 Julie Dillon* [72]
Galen Dara [72]
Christian McGrath [72]
Victo Ngai [72]
John Picacio [72]
Sana Takeda [72]
2018 Sana Takeda* [73]
Galen Dara [73]
Kathleen Jennings [73]
Bastien Lecouffe-Deharme [73]
Victo Ngai [73]
John Picacio [73]

Retro Hugos

Beginning with the 1996 Worldcon, the World Science Fiction Society created the concept of "Retro Hugos", in which the Hugo award could be retroactively awarded for 50, 75, or 100 years prior. Retro Hugos may only be awarded for years in which a Worldcon was hosted, but no awards were originally given.[6][Note 1] Retro Hugos have been awarded six times, for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954. The 1939, 1941, and 1943 awards were given 75 years later; the other three awards were given 50 years later.[1]

Year Year awarded Artist Ref(s)
1939 2014 Virgil Finlay* [74]
Margaret Brundage [74]
Frank R. Paul [74]
Alex Schomburg [74]
H. W. "Wesso" Wessolowski [74]
1941 2016 Virgil Finlay* [75]
Hannes Bok [75]
Margaret Brundage [75]
Edd Cartier [75]
Frank R. Paul [75]
Hubert Rogers [75]
1943 2018 Virgil Finlay* [76]
Hannes Bok [76]
Margaret Brundage [76]
Edd Cartier [76]
Harold W. McCauley [76]
Hubert Rogers [76]
1946 1996 Virgil Finlay* [77]
Earle K. Bergey [77]
Hannes Bok [77]
Edd Cartier [77]
Frank R. Paul [77]
1951 2001 Frank Kelly Freas* [78]
Hannes Bok [78]
Chesley Bonestell [78]
Edd Cartier [78]
Virgil Finlay [78]
1954 2004 Chesley Bonestell* [79]
Ed Emshwiller [79]
Virgil Finlay [79]
Frank Kelly Freas [79]
Richard Powers [79]

Notes

  1. ^ Although no "Best Professional Artist" Hugo was awarded at the 1957 convention, Hugos were awarded in other categories, hence there was no "Retro Hugo" for 1957 awarded in 2007.[6]

References

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External links

Alex Schomburg

Alex A. Schomburg, born Alejandro Schomburg y Rosa (; May 10, 1905 – April 7, 1998), was an American commercial artist and comic-book artist and painter whose career lasted over 70 years.

Barclay Shaw

Barclay Shaw (born 1949) is an American professional artist best known for his fantasy and science fiction artwork. He has been nominated five times for the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist, and has earned a top ten ranking six times in the annual Locus Poll Award for Best Artist. In 1995, his work "Wonderland (wood)" won the Chesley Award for Best Three-Dimensional Art.

Bob Eggleton

Bob Eggleton (born September 13, 1960) is an American science fiction, fantasy, and horror artist. Eggleton has been honored with the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist eight times, first winning in 1994. He also won the Hugo Award for Best Related Book in 2001 for his art book "Greetings From Earth". He has also won the Chesley Award for Artistic Achievement in 1999 and was the guest of honor at Chicon 2000.

Eggleton's drawing and paintings cover a wide range of science fiction, fantasy, and horror topics, depicting space ships, alien worlds and inhabitants, dragons, vampires, and other fantasy creatures. His view on space ships were that they should look organic, and claimed that as a child, he was disappointed with the space shuttles and rockets NASA produced; they were nothing like fantasy artists of the twenties and thirties had promised. His fascination with dragons originated with his childhood interest of dinosaurs, which can be seen in the book Greetings From Earth. His paintings are commissioned and bought at science fiction conventions, and used as book covers.Eggleton has illustrated cards for the Magic: The Gathering collectible card game.

Eggleton received massive encouragement from his father, in the form of books, supplies, visits to museums of space and aeronautics and support during the career choices he made. Eggleton dropped out of his art college, because he felt it was not for him.

Eggleton is a fan of Godzilla, has illustrated numerous comics, magazines and children's books based on the character and worked as a creative consultant on the American remake. While in Japan he appeared as an extra in one of the more recent films.Asteroid 13562 was named Bobeggleton in his honor.

Daniel Dos Santos

Daniel Dos Santos (born 1978) is an American speculative fiction artist whose work has appeared on book covers by publishers Tor, Bantam, Pyr, and many more, as well as a variety of magazine and comic covers and interiors. He has been nominated for the Hugo Award seven times.

A love of comics led Dos Santos to an interest in art. During his final year of high school, he served an internship with Steven Stroud. Following graduation, he attended the School of Visual Arts in New York City, where he began to focus on speculative art. Dos Santos and Stroud founded a studio in Shelton, Connecticut, after he graduated.Dos Santos, along with Irene Gallo, has hosted a series of live art demonstrations at the Society of Illustrators in Manhattan called "Art Out Loud." The series began as a collaborative painting demo, but changed over time to better reflect the way in which artists actually work.Dos Santos has been nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist each year since 2009. Dos Santos received the Rhodes Family Award for special achievement in illustration in 2000, as well as the Starr Foundation Award for 2001. He has received the 2007 Jack Gaughan Award for Best Emerging Artist and won the first Chesley Award for Best Cover Illustration – Paperback in the same year.

David A. Hardy

David A. Hardy (born 10 April 1936) is a British space artist.

Don Maitz

Don Maitz is an American science fiction, fantasy, and commercial artist. He has twice won the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist, science fiction's highest honor for an artist. His peers in the Association of Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists have honored him ten times with a Chesley Award for outstanding achievement, and he has received a Silver Medal of Excellence from the Society of Illustrators.

A native of Plainville, Connecticut, he is a 1975 graduate of the Paier School of Art. His art has adorned the covers of books by Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, C. J. Cherryh, Stephen King, Gene Wolfe, Michael Moorcock, and Raymond E. Feist, among others. Two compilations of his work have been published, Dreamquests: The Art Of Don Maitz, and First Maitz. He also created the "Captain" character of the Captain Morgan brand of rum.

Maitz resides in Florida with his wife, fantasy novelist and artist Janny Wurts.

Donato Giancola

Donato Giancola (born 1967) is an American artist specializing in narrative realism with science fiction and fantasy content.

Eddie Jones (artist)

Edward John Jones (18 January 1935 – 15 October 1999) was a British science fiction illustrator; initially known as a fan artist, he later became a professional freelancer. He illustrated numerous science fiction book and magazine covers, some under the pseudonym S. Fantoni, and provided interior illustrations for books and magazines. Jones was active in the field from 1953 to 1985, and reprints of his artwork continued to appear on book covers until his death in 1999.

In 1969, he became the art editor for Vision of Tomorrow, a short-lived British SF magazine. Although probably best known for his Star Trek covers for Bantam Books and almost fifty covers for Sphere Books, much of his output was for German publishers, including more than 100 covers for Bastei Lübbe's science fiction imprint and over 500 for Terra Astra magazine.The Science Fiction Writers of America described Jones as "the precursor to a generation of artists that helped define the look of early '70s SF illustration". He was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist in 1970 and 1971. In Larry Niven's short story "Singularities Make Me Nervous", from Convergent Series, the protagonist, speaking in the future, describes his apartment as containing "Eddie Jones originals".

Girl Genius

Girl Genius is an ongoing comic book series turned webcomic, written and drawn by Phil and Kaja Foglio and published by their company Studio Foglio LLC under the imprint Airship Entertainment. The comic has won five WCCA awards including 2008 Outstanding Comic, and been nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist, an Eagle Award and twice for an Eisner Award; in 2009, 2010, and 2011 it won the Hugo Award for Best Graphic Story.

Girl Genius has the tagline of "Adventure, Romance, MAD SCIENCE!". It features a female lead character in an alternate-history Victorian-style "steampunk" setting, although elements veer from what is usually thought of as steampunk. Kaja Foglio, one of the co-creators, describes it as "gaslamp fantasy" instead to suggest its more fantastic style.

The Foglios have also written three Girl Genius novels, Agatha H. and the Airship City. Agatha H. and the Clockwork Princess and Agatha H and the Voice of the Castle, all published by Night Shade Books.

Jim Burns

Jim Burns (born 10 April 1948), is a Welsh artist born in Cardiff, Wales. He has been called one of the Grand Masters of the science fiction art world.In 1966 he joined the Royal Air Force, but soon thereafter he left and signed up at the Newport School of Art for a year's foundation course.

After that, he went on to complete a 3-year Diploma in Art and Design at Saint Martin's School of Art in London. When he left Saint Martin's in 1972 he had already joined the recently established illustration agency Young Artists. He has been with this agency, later renamed Arena, ever since.

He is today a contemporary British science fiction illustrator. His work mostly deals with science fiction with erotic overtones. His paintings are generally intricate photo-realistic works of beautiful women set against advanced machines and spaceships. While his preparatory sketches are more erotically focused, his final works and published book covers have a more academic tone portraying far off and imaginary worlds.Apart from book and game covers, Burns briefly worked with Ridley Scott on Blade Runner, and his illustrations and paintings comprise much of the book Mechanismo by Harry Harrison. He has also had books of his own works published, including Lightship, Planet Story (written by Harry Harrison), Transluminal, and Imago.

Burns won the Hugo award for best professional artist three times and has also been awarded 12 BSFA awards. Well regarded in fandom, he was artist guest of honour at the 1987 Worldcon.

John Schoenherr

John Carl Schoenherr (July 5, 1935 – April 8, 2010) was an American illustrator. He won the 1988 Caldecott Medal for U.S. children's book illustration, recognizing Owl Moon by Jane Yolen, a father-and-daughter story where only Schoenherr's drawings reveal the child's gender. He was posthumously inducted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2015.

Julie Dillon

Julie Dillon (born in 1982) is an American artist specializing in science fiction and fantasy art. A freelance illustrator, Dillon has created images for games, book and magazine covers, and covers for musical albums. Dillon's work has been nominated for the Chesley Award three times; she won the 2010 Chesley Award for Best Unpublished Color for "Planetary Alignment" (subsequently published as a cover for Clarkesworld Magazine), as well as the 2011 Chesley Award for "The Dala Horse" in Best Interior Illustration. She was nominated for the World Fantasy Award for Best Artist in 2012 and received the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist in 2014, 2015, and 2017. She also received two Chesley Awards in 2015 for the Best Cover Illustrations for a magazine and a hardback book. Dillon lives and works in California.

Leo and Diane Dillon

Leo Dillon (March 2, 1933 – May 26, 2012) and Diane Dillon (née Sorber; born March 13, 1933) were American illustrators of children's books and adult paperback book and magazine covers. One obituary of Leo called the work of the husband-and-wife team "a seamless amalgam of both their hands". In more than 50 years they created more than 100 speculative fiction book and magazine covers together as well as much interior artwork. Essentially all of their work in that field was joint.The Dillons won the Caldecott Medal in 1976 and 1977, the only consecutive awards of the honor. In 1978 they were runners-up for the Hans Christian Andersen Award for children's illustrators; they were the U.S. nominee again in 1996.

Mel Hunter

Milford "Mel" Joseph Hunter (July 27, 1927 – February 20, 2004) was a 20th-century American illustrator. He enjoyed a successful career as a science fiction illustrator, producing illustrations for famous science fiction authors such as Isaac Asimov and Robert A. Heinlein, as well as a technical and scientific illustrator for clients such as The Pentagon, Hayden Planetarium, and the Massachusetts Audubon Society.

Michael Komarck

Michael Komarck is a fantasy artist. His work has been featured in many roleplaying games, board games, book covers, and collectible cards. Komarck produced the official art and calendars for George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire.

Rick Sternbach

Richard Michael Sternbach (born 1951 in Bridgeport, Connecticut) is an illustrator who is best known for his space illustrations and his work on the Star Trek television series.

Roy Krenkel

Roy Gerald Krenkel (11 July 1918 – 24 February 1983), who often signed his work RGK, was an American illustrator who specialized in fantasy and historical drawings and paintings for books, magazines and comic books.

Stephen Fabian

Stephen Emil Fabian Sr. is an American artist.

Vincent Di Fate

Vincent Di Fate (born November 21, 1945) is an American artist specializing in science fiction, fantasy and realistic space art (hardware art) illustration. He was inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame on June 25, 2011.Di Fate was born in Yonkers, New York. He studied at the Phoenix School of Design in New York City and received his MA in Illustration at Syracuse University.

He broke into speculative fiction pulp magazines with illustrations for three different stories in the August 1969 issue of Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, edited by John W. Campbell, and did his first cover illustration for the November issue.Di Fate calls his 1997 book Infinite Worlds "the first comprehensive history of science fiction art in America".

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