Hughie Critz

Hugh Melville Critz (September 17, 1900 – January 10, 1980) was an American second baseman in Major League Baseball for the Cincinnati Reds in the 1920s and the New York Giants in the 1930s.

Hughie Critz
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Second baseman
Born: September 17, 1900
Starkville, Mississippi
Died: January 10, 1980 (aged 79)
Greenwood, Mississippi
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 31, 1924, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
September 18, 1935, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.268
Home runs38
Runs batted in531
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career overview

Critz was born in Starkville, Mississippi, and attended college in his home town at Mississippi State University, where his father, Professor Colonel Critz, was a respected instructor.

In his first major league game, he had two hits off Hall-of-Fame pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander, and went on to hit .322 in 102 games, with 19 stolen bases, as a rookie.

Through the 1920s, he was an extremely solid, speedy, good-hitting second baseman for many decent Reds teams although the team began to decline in the late 1920s, finishing seventh in the eight-team National League in 1929 and 1930. In the Reds' best year with Critz on the team, 1926, they finished second in the league two games behind the champion St. Louis Cardinals. Alongside the Reds' success that year, he also had what could easily be considered his best season, batting .270, with 3 homers and 79 RBIs. He tied his career high for triples with 14 and had his next-best career high in RBIs with 79. He finished second in MVP voting, behind only Bob O'Farrell.

Although his speed numbers only decreased from his rookie season, when he stole 19 bases, he still averaged 11 stolen bases per season for his career.

In 1930, his career took a sudden turn when he was traded to the Giants for pitcher Larry Benton. With them, he won a World Series in 1933, had more quality years and retired on September 27, 1935.

In a 12-season career, he batted .268 with 38 home runs and 531 RBIs in 1478 games. He had 97 career stolen bases, 832 runs scored, 195 doubles and 95 triples, accumulating 1591 hits in 5930 at bats.

He made the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1962, and died in Greenwood, Mississippi at age 79.

External links

1924 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1924 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83–70, 10 games behind the New York Giants.

1925 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1925 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 80–73, 15 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1927 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1927 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 75–78, 18½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1928 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1928 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 78–74, 16 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1929 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1929 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 66–88, 33 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1930 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1930 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 59–95, 33 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1930 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1930 New York Giants season was the 48th in franchise history. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 87–67, 5 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1931 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1931 New York Giants season was the franchise's 49th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 87-65 record, 13 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1932 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1932 New York Giants season was the franchise's 50th season. The team finished in a tie for sixth place in the National League with a 72-82 record, 18 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1933 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1933 New York Giants season was the franchise's 51st season. The team won the National League pennant and beat the Washington Senators of the American League in the World Series.

1934 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1934 New York Giants season was the franchise's 52nd season. Although they led in the standings for most of the season, the team finished in second place in the National League with a 93-60 record, 2 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1935 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1935 New York Giants season was the franchise's 53rd season. The team finished in third place in the National League with a 91-62 record, 8½ games behind the Chicago Cubs.

Critz

Critz, de Critz (also Decritz), and Kritz is a surname. Notable people with the name include:

CritzHugh Critz (1876–1939) President of Mississippi State University

Hughie Critz (1900–1980), American second baseman in Major League Baseball

Mark Critz (born 1962), American politician from Pennsylvaniade Crtiz (Decritz)John de Critz (1551/2–1642) Flemish painter

Thomas de Critz (1607–1653), English painterKritzKarl Kritz (1906–1969), Austrian conductor

Ori Kritz, Israeli language and literature professor

George Burns (outfielder)

George Joseph Burns (November 24, 1889 – August 15, 1966) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who spent most of his career as the leadoff hitter for the New York Giants. A soft-spoken person, he was nicknamed "Silent George" by his teammates, and he was said to be one of the best pool players ever to play major league baseball. An effective leadoff man who was revered for his plate discipline, Burns is one of only three players in major league history to lead the league in runs and walks five times each; the others are Ted Williams and Babe Ruth. A two-time stolen base champion, he holds the Giants franchise record for stolen bases in a single season (62, in 1914), and held the club's career record from 1919 to 1972. At the end of his career, his 1262 games in left field ranked eighth in major league history, and his total of 1844 games in the outfield ranked sixth in NL history.

Born in Utica, New York, Burns started his baseball career as a catcher, and reached the Giants in the latter half of the 1911 season. Because of his strong throwing arm and outstanding speed, manager John McGraw converted him into an outfielder. He joined the regular lineup in 1913 and, becoming one of the first players to wear sunglasses and using a long-billed cap, came to excel defensively in left field at the Polo Grounds with its difficult angles; the left field bleachers came to be known as "Burnsville", and his teammates would later describe him as the "greatest 'sunfielder' in the history of the game." In his rookie season he hit 37 doubles, bettering Jim O'Rourke's 1889 club record of 36; the mark would stand for only two years, however, before Larry Doyle hit 40 in 1915. 1913 also marked Burns' first World Series appearance, though he only batted .158 as the Giants lost.

In 1914 he led the NL in runs for the first time and batted a career-high .303, and also edged Josh Devore's 1911 club record of 61 steals by one; he finished fourth in the voting for the Chalmers (MVP) Award, in the last year such an award would be given in the NL until 1924. In 1917 he batted .302, led the NL in runs a third time and in walks for the first time, and finished second in the NL in total bases behind Hornsby; he also appeared in his second World Series, but had another poor performance, hitting .227 as the Giants again lost. In 1919 he led the league in runs, walks and steals again, and also led NL outfielders in fielding percentage for the first time. He surpassed his teammate Doyle's franchise record for career stolen bases; his eventual record of 334 was broken by Willie Mays in 1972. Burns hit for the cycle on September 17, 1920, and led the NL in runs for the fifth time that year.

In the 1921 World Series, Burns finally had a successful postseason; he had four hits in Game 3 as the Giants rolled to a 13–5 win, and had a 2-run double in the 8th inning of Game 4, breaking a 1–1 tie as New York evened the Series at two games each. He scored the deciding run in Game 6, and batted .333 for the Series as the Giants won their first title since 1905. Two months later he was sent to the Cincinnati Reds in a trade that brought third baseman Heinie Groh to the Giants. In 1922 Burns set an NL record with his 28th steal of home, surpassing the old mark held by Honus Wagner; Max Carey broke his record later in the decade. He also set a Reds club record with 631 at bats (Hughie Critz broke the mark in 1928). In the Reds' first game at New York that season, he was given a day in his honor and presented with a diamond-studded watch.

Burns ended his major league career with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1925. In a 15-season career, he was a .287 hitter with 1,188 runs, 41 home runs and 611 runs batted in in 1853 games played. He collected 2,077 hits with a .366 on-base percentage, and his 383 stolen bases ranked 12th all-time at that point. Although he never had more than 181 hits in a season, playing in an era of diminished hitting, he was among the league's top five players six times. Defensively, he recorded a .970 fielding percentage at all three outfield positions. His NL record of leading the league in outfield games six times was later matched by Billy Williams and Dale Murphy; his Giants record of 1184 games in left field was broken by Jo-Jo Moore in 1941.

In 1918, a sportswriter asked John McGraw who the best player he ever managed was aside from Christy Mathewson. McGraw said, "George Burns! He is a marvel in every department of play, a superb fielder, a wonderful thrower, a grand batsman and with few peers in baseball history as a run scorer. Best of all, Burns, modest and retiring to an extreme, is the easiest player to handle that ever stepped upon a field."In a 1920 Sporting News article, sportswriter John B. Sheridan ranked Burns as the fourth greatest outfielder in history, behind only Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker and Jimmy Sheckard. "I am one of those who think that Burns has been underrated in New York and elsewhere," Sheridan said. "He is one of the great outfielders of all time. I have never seen him play a bad game of baseball."In 1927 he became a player-coach with Williamsport in the New York–Penn League, and he returned to the Giants in 1937 as a coach. He later worked for a tannery, and retired in 1957.

Burns died in Gloversville, New York at age 76.

Hugh Critz

This article is about the University President, for the baseball player see Hughie CritzHugh Critz (December 21, 1876 – 1939) was the President of the Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College from 1930–1934. It was during his tenure that the Mississippi Legislature renamed the school Mississippi State University. Prior to that he had served as president of Arkansas Tech University.

List of Major League Baseball career assists leaders

In baseball, an assist (denoted by A) is a defensive statistic, baseball being one of the few sports in which the defensive team controls the ball. An assist is credited to every defensive player who fields or touches the ball (after it has been hit by the batter) prior to the recording of a putout, even if the contact was unintentional. For example, if a ball strikes a player's leg and bounces off him to another fielder, who tags the baserunner, the first player is credited with an assist. A fielder can receive a maximum of one assist per out recorded. An assist is also credited if a putout would have occurred, had another fielder not committed an error. For example, a shortstop might field a ground ball cleanly, but the first baseman might drop his throw. In this case, an error would be charged to the first baseman, and the shortstop would be credited with an assist.

Rabbit Maranville is the all-time leader with 8,967 career assists. Ozzie Smith (8,375), Cal Ripken Jr. (8,214), Bill Dahlen (8,138), Omar Vizquel (8,050), and Luis Aparicio (8,016) are the only other players to record more than 8,000 career assists.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a second baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between third and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Fred Pfeffer is the all-time leader in errors as a second baseman with 857 career. Pfeffer is the only second basemen to commit over 800 career errors. Bid McPhee (792) and Cub Stricker (701) and the only other second basemen to commit more than 700 career errors.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a second baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between third and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Bid McPhee is the all-time leader in career putouts as a second baseman with 6,552. Eddie Collins (6,526) and Nellie Fox (6,090) are the only other second basemen with over 6,000 career putouts.

Mississippi State League

The Mississippi State League was a professional, Class-D minor baseball league that played in 1921.

It featured four teams: the Clarksdale Cubs of Clarksdale, Mississippi, the Greenwood Indians of Greenwood, Mississippi, the Jackson Red Sox of Jackson, Mississippi and the Meridian Mets of Meridian, Mississippi.The Cubs finished in first place in the league's only year of existence, though Greenwood beat them in the postseason, five games to none. Meridian finished in third place, while Jackson finished in last.

Multiple future and former major leaguers played in the league, including Hughie Critz, Happy Foreman, Red Lucas, Red McDermott, Rebel Oakes (who also managed Jackson) and Earl Webb.

The league folded after 1921. All four cities had teams in the Cotton States League the following year.

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