Hugh Duffy

Hugh Duffy (November 26, 1866 – October 19, 1954) was an American outfielder and manager in Major League Baseball. He was a player or player-manager for the Chicago White Stockings, Chicago Pirates, Boston Reds, Boston Beaneaters, Milwaukee Brewers and Philadelphia Phillies between 1888 and 1906. He had his best years with the Beaneaters, including the 1894 season, when he set the MLB single-season record for batting average (.440).

He also managed the Chicago White Sox and Boston Red Sox and spent several seasons coaching in collegiate baseball and in the minor leagues. Later in life, he spent many years as a scout for the Red Sox. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1945. He worked for Boston until 1953. He died of heart problems the next year.

Hugh Duffy
Hugh Duffy portrait
Outfielder / Manager
Born: November 26, 1866
Cranston, Rhode Island
Died: October 19, 1954 (aged 87)
Boston, Massachusetts
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 23, 1888, for the Chicago White Stockings
Last MLB appearance
April 13, 1906, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Batting average.326
Hits2,293
Home runs106
Runs batted in1,302
Stolen bases574
Managerial record535–671
Winning %.444
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1945
Election MethodVeteran's Committee

Early life

Hugh Duffy Baseball
Duffy in 1921

Duffy was born in Cranston, Rhode Island to Irish immigrant Michael Duffy and wife Margaret Duffy.[1] He was a textile mill worker who had taken up baseball as a semipro for weekend diversion.[2] He played a couple years of minor league ball in the New England League before jumping to the majors, starting up in the league's initial season of 1886, and playing on clubs in Hartford, Springfield and Salem, as well as the Lowell, Massachusetts team in 1887.[3]

Playing career

Duffy entered the National League with Cap Anson's Chicago White Stockings in 1888 after receiving an offer of $2,000 from the club. Anson initially was unimpressed with the 5 ft 7 in (1.70 m), 150 pound Duffy, telling him, "We already have a batboy."[4] He shortly thereafter earned the reputation of an outstanding outfielder and powerful hitter. Duffy ended up replacing Billy Sunday as the team's regular right fielder. He switched leagues, joining the American Association's Boston Reds in 1891; he then returned to the NL with the Boston Beaneaters in 1892, where he enjoyed his best seasons.

From 1891 through 1900, Duffy knocked in 100 runs or more eight times. In 1894 Duffy had one of the greatest seasons in baseball history, leading the league with 18 home runs, with 145 RBI and a .440 batting average (see Major League Baseball Triple Crown). Duffy's .440 average is the major league single-season batting average record.[5] At one point during the season, Duffy had a 26-game hitting streak.[6] He was player-manager for the Milwaukee Brewers in 1901. During the 1902 and 1903 seasons, Duffy was player-manager for the Western League's Milwaukee franchise.[7]

Duffy was a player-manager for the Phillies from 1904 to 1906. He finished his career in 1906 with 106 home runs which was, at the time, one of the highest career totals.

Post-playing career

Hugh Duffy HOF plaque
Duffy's plaque at the Baseball Hall of Fame

Duffy spent three years (1907–1909) as manager of the Providence Grays. He made $2,000 in his last season as the Providence manager and The Evening News in Providence wrote that Duffy was paid hundreds of dollars less than any other manager in the Eastern League. During Duffy's three seasons, Providence finished in third place, second place and third place, respectively.[8]

Duffy agreed to manage the Chicago White Sox in 1910.[8] He stayed with the team in 1911. He moved to the Milwaukee Brewers of the American Association in 1912, but he was fired after a season in which the team struggled.[9] He turned down an offer to manage the 1913 St. Paul Saints, saying that he was hoping to work in the east.[10] He coached the Harvard varsity and freshman baseball squads from 1917 through 1919.[11] He also managed the 1920 Toronto Maple Leafs of the International League to a .701 winning percentage — the best in the team's 83-year history, but only good enough for second place in the league.

In 1921, Duffy was hired as full-time manager of the Red Sox, guiding them for two seasons. Duffy became a scout for the Boston Red Sox in 1924.

Later life

Duffy remained on the scouting staff of the Red Sox nearly to the end of his life, retiring in 1953. He died in Boston on October 19, 1954.[6] He had been suffering from heart problems.[12] Duffy's wife Nora died the previous year; they did not have children.[13]

Posthumously

In 2019, Duffy was inducted into the Atlanta Braves Hall of Fame, along with Terry Pendleton.[14]

See also

References

  1. ^ Hubbard, Donald (2008). The Heavenly Twins of Boston Baseball: A Dual Biography of Hugh Duffy and Tommy McCarthy. McFarland. ISBN 9780786434558.
  2. ^ Bill Ferber (2007) A Game of Baseball: The Orioles, The Beaneaters and The Battle For The 1897 Pennant, University of Nebraska Press, ISBN 978-0-8032-1136-0, pg. 36
  3. ^ George V. Tuohey (1897) A History of the Boston Base Ball Club, M.F. Quinn & Co, Excerpt, pg. 130
  4. ^ Bill Ferber (2007) A Game of Baseball: The Orioles, The Beaneaters and The Battle For The 1897 Pennant, University of Nebraska Press, ISBN 978-0-8032-1136-0, pg. 37
  5. ^ Baseball's Top 100: The Game's Greatest Records, p.26, Kerry Banks, 2010, Greystone Books, Vancouver, BC, ISBN 978-1-55365-507-7
  6. ^ a b "Hugh Duffy left unequaled mark, was mighty mite". The Milwaukee Journal. October 20, 1954. Retrieved November 9, 2014.
  7. ^ Louis P. Masur (2003) Autumn Glory: Baseball's First World Series, Hill and Wang, ISBN 0-8090-2763-1, pg. 98
  8. ^ a b "Hugh Duffy has signed to manage "White Sox"". The Evening News (Providence, Rhode Island). October 20, 1909. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  9. ^ "Timely homer took heat off Felsch sale". Milwaukee Journal. February 6, 1949. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  10. ^ Vaughan, Manning (November 13, 1912). "Hugh Duffy turns down St. Paul job". Milwaukee Sentinel. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  11. ^ "Battery men at Harvard report". The Christian Science Monitor. February 14, 1919.
  12. ^ "Hugh Duffy dies". Eugene Register-Guard. October 20, 1954. Retrieved November 9, 2014.
  13. ^ "Baseball's Hugh Duffy dies at home at 87". Ocala Star-Banner. October 20, 1954. Retrieved November 9, 2014.
  14. ^ "Terry Pendleton, Hugh Duffy make Braves HOF". MLB.com. Retrieved 2019-01-18.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
N/A
Boston Red Sox first-base coach
1939
Succeeded by
Moe Berg
1889 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1889 Chicago White Stockings season was the 18th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 14th in the National League and the 5th at the first West Side Park. The White Stockings finished third in the National League with a record of 67–65.

1897 Boston Beaneaters season

The 1897 Boston Beaneaters season was the 27th season of the franchise. The Beaneaters won the National League pennant, their fourth of the decade and their seventh overall. After the season, the Beaneaters played in the Temple Cup for the first time. They lost the series to the second-place Baltimore Orioles, 4 games to 1.

1898 Boston Beaneaters season

The 1898 Boston Beaneaters season was the 28th season of the franchise. The Beaneaters won their second straight National League pennant and their eighth overall. It was also their fifth, and last, of the decade. This team has been cited (along with the 1880s St. Louis Browns and the 1890s Baltimore Orioles) as one of the greatest of the 19th century. This was the end of a tremendous run of success for the team, which won four straight National Association titles (1872–1875) and eight National League pennants (1877-78, 1883, 1891-93, 1897-98).

The starting line-up featured three Hall of Famers: third baseman Jimmy Collins and outfielders Billy Hamilton and Hugh Duffy. Collins led the league with 15 home runs, and Hamilton hit .369 with 54 stolen bases. The pitching staff was led by Hall of Famers Kid Nichols and Vic Willis. Nichols led the NL with 31 wins and had an ERA of 2.13.

1901 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1901 Milwaukee Brewers were an American baseball team. The Brewers finished eighth in the American League with a record of 48 wins and 89 losses, 35.5 games behind the Chicago White Stockings. After the season, the club left Milwaukee for St. Louis and became the St. Louis Browns, where they would remain until the end of 1953.

1904 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1904 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1905 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1905 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 69 losses.

1906 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1906 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 71 wins and 82 losses.

1921 Boston Red Sox season

The 1921 Boston Red Sox season was the 21st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses.

1922 Boston Red Sox season

The 1922 Boston Red Sox season was the 22nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 61 wins and 93 losses.

1939 Syracuse Orangemen football team

The 1939 Syracuse Orangemen football team represented Syracuse University in the 1939 college football season. The Orangemen were led by third-year head coach Ossie Solem and played their home games at Archbold Stadium in Syracuse, New York. The team was co-captained by guard Hugh "Duffy" Daugherty, who would later become a Hall-of-Fame-inducted coach at Michigan State.

Boston Reds (1890–1891) all-time roster

The Boston Reds were a Major League Baseball franchise that played in the Players' League (PL) in 1890, and one season in the American Association (AA) in 1891. In both seasons, the Reds were their league's champion, making them the second team to win back-to-back championships in two different leagues. The first franchise to accomplish this feat was the Brooklyn Bridegrooms, who won the AA championship in 1889 and the National League (NL) championship in 1890. The Reds played their home games at the Congress Street Grounds.The Reds were an instant success on the field and in the public's opinion. The team signed several top-level players, and they played in a larger, more comfortable and modern ballpark than the Boston Beaneaters, the popular and well established cross-town rival. Player signings that first year included future Hall of Famers King Kelly, Dan Brouthers, and Charles Radbourn, along with other veterans such as Hardy Richardson, Matt Kilroy, Harry Stovey, and Tom Brown. The PL ended after one season, leaving most of its teams without a league.After the dissolution of the PL, the AA voted to allow the Reds into the new combined league. This was based on the condition that all players be returned to their former clubs via the reserve clause. Although the team's on-field captain, Kelly, became the player-manager for a new AA club, the Cincinnati Kelly's Killers, the Reds stayed intact by keeping several of their top players. Of the club's key players from the previous year's team, Brouthers, Richardson, and Brown were retained. To fill the void of the departing players, the team brought in future Hall of Famers Hugh Duffy and Clark Griffith, along with solid veterans Paul Radford, Charlie Buffinton, and George Haddock. When the 1891 season ended, the AA folded as well, leaving the NL as the sole major league, and the Reds were bought out by the surviving NL clubs.

Edward F. Kenney Sr.

Edward F. Kenney Sr. (1921–2006) was an American professional baseball executive.

A native of Massachusetts, Kenney was born in Medford and raised in Winchester where he captained the high school baseball team. He later spent three years as the starting shortstop for the Boston College, where he graduated in 1943 and enlisted in the United States Army. At the conclusion of World War II, he was signed by Hugh Duffy, a Boston Red Sox scout and former manager, who converted him to a pitcher. Kenney joined the Boston organization as a prospect in 1946, but his pitching career was curtailed prematurely by arm problems. During the Red Sox drive to the American League pennant that season, he worked in the club's ticket office.In 1948, Kenney joined the Red Sox Minor League department. One year later became assistant farm director to Johnny Murphy and later to Neil Mahoney. That department was divided into two sections in 1968, and Kenney became director of minor league operations until 1978, when was promoted to vice president. From 1989 until his 1991 retirement, Kenney served as vice president of baseball development.In his 43-year tenure with the Red Sox organization, Kenney contributed to develop a significant number of outstanding players such as Wade Boggs, Roger Clemens, Dwight Evans, Carlton Fisk, Bruce Hurst, Fred Lynn and Jim Rice.

His father, Thomas Kenney, worked as an assistant for Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey for several years beginning in 1934, while his son, Edward Kenney, Jr., worked in baseball operations for both the Red Sox and Orioles.Kenney died on October 25, 2006 in Braintree, Massachusetts at the age of 85, due to complications related to diabetes.

In 2008, Kenney was selected for induction into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame.

Hugh Duffy (rugby)

Hugh Duffy (1 April 1934 - 30 December 2017) was a Scottish rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Scotland, making his début in a five nations international match against France in Paris, and at club level for Jed Thistle, and Jed-Forest RFC, as a Flanker, i.e. number 6 or 7, and club level rugby league (RL) for Salford and Halifax (Heritage № 722), as a forward. Duffy was one of the first XV Scottish rugby union internationals to move to rugby league.

List of Atlanta Braves team records

The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Atlanta. The Braves formed in 1876 as the Boston Red Stockings. After moving to Milwaukee for 12 years, the Braves relocated to Atlanta in 1966. Through 2010, the Braves have played 20,053 games, winning 9,945, losing 9,954, and tying 154, for a winning percentage of approximately .500. This list documents the superlative records and accomplishments of team members during their tenures in MLB.

Hank Aaron holds the most franchise records as of the end of the 2010 season, with ten, including most career hits, doubles, and the best career on-base plus slugging percentage. Aaron also held the career home runs record from April 8, 1974 until August 8, 2007. He is followed by Hugh Duffy, who holds eight records, including best single-season batting average and the best single-season slugging percentage record.Four Braves players currently hold Major League Baseball records. Duffy holds the best single-season batting average record, accumulating an average of .440 in 1890. Bob Horner and Bobby Lowe are tied with 13 others for the most home runs in a game, with four, which they recorded on May 30, 1890, and July 6, 1986, respectively. Red Barrett, a Brave for six years, holds the record for fewest pitches by a single pitcher in a complete game, with 58, which he achieved on August 10, 1944.

List of Baltimore Orioles managers

In its 118-year history, the Baltimore Orioles baseball franchise of Major League Baseball's American League has employed 42 managers. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. Of those 42 managers, 12 have been "player-managers"; specifically, they managed the team while still being signed as a player. Since 1992, the team has played its home games at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.The Baltimore franchise began operations in Milwaukee, Wisconsin as the Brewers (not to be confused with the current National League team of the same name) in 1901. After one season in Wisconsin under manager and Hall of Famer Hugh Duffy, the franchise moved south to St. Louis, Missouri, adopting the St. Louis Browns name and hiring a new manager, Jimmy McAleer. The Browns remained in Missouri until the end of the 1953 season, when Major League Baseball's owners elected to move the franchise to Baltimore, Maryland, where they were renamed the Orioles, after Maryland's state bird.Seven managers have taken the Orioles franchise to the post-season; Earl Weaver led the Orioles to a team-record six playoff appearances. Weaver, Hank Bauer, and Joe Altobelli are the only managers who have won a World Series championship with the club: Bauer in the 1966 World Series, over the Los Angeles Dodgers; Weaver in the 1970 World Series, over the Cincinnati Reds; and Altobelli in the 1983 World Series, over the Philadelphia Phillies. Weaver is the longest-tenured manager in franchise history, with 2,541 games of service in parts of 17 seasons (1968–1982, 1985–1986). The manager with the highest winning percentage in his career with the franchise is Luman Harris, owner of a .630 winning percentage during his 27 games managed in 1961; conversely, the worst winning percentage in franchise history is .222 by Oscar Melillo, who posted a 2–7 record during the 1938 season. Eight Orioles managers have been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, including Frank Robinson, who was the first African-American manager in Major League Baseball; and Rogers Hornsby, who was a member of the cross-city rival Cardinals during the franchise's tenure in St. Louis.

List of Boston Red Sox coaches

The following is a list of coaches, including role(s) and year(s) of service, for the Boston Red Sox American League franchise (1901–present), known during its early history as the Boston Americans (1901–1907).

List of Chicago White Sox managers

The Chicago White Sox is a U.S. professional baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. The White Sox are members of the American League Central Division in Major League Baseball. In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. Since the inception of the team in 1901, it has employed 40 different managers. The White Sox's current manager is Rick Renteria, who was appointed on October 3, 2016.

The franchise's first manager was Hall of Famer Clark Griffith, who managed the team for two seasons and led them to the American League championship in their inaugural season. Fielder Jones, who managed the team from 1904 to 1908, led the team to its second American League championship and its first World Series championship (no World Series was played in 1901), defeating the White Sox's crosstown rivals, the Chicago Cubs, in the 1906 World Series. Pants Rowland and Kid Gleason managed the White Sox to American League championships in 1917 and 1919, respectively, with the White Sox winning the 1917 World Series but losing the 1919 World Series in the infamous Black Sox scandal. The White Sox did not win another American League championship until 1959, with Al López as their manager. The White Sox lost the 1959 World Series to the Los Angeles Dodgers. The White Sox next captured the American League pennant in 2005 and, with Ozzie Guillén as their manager, defeated the Houston Astros in the 2005 World Series.The longest–tenured White Sox manager was Jimmy Dykes, who managed the team for 1,850 games from 1934 to 1946. The only other White Sox managers who have managed more than 1,000 games are Lopez with 1,495, Guillén with 1,135, and Tony La Russa with 1,035. Dykes' 899 wins and 940 losses also lead all White Sox managers. Jones' winning percentage of .592 is the highest of any White Sox manager. Five White Sox managers have served multiple terms managing the team. Nixey Callahan was the White Sox manager in 1903 and part of 1904, and then again from 1912 to 1914. Johnny Evers served two terms as manager, separated by a bout of appendicitis in 1924. Eddie Collins served as interim manager for 27 games in 1924 season while Evers was ill and then served as the full–time manager in 1925 and 1926. Lopez served three terms as manager: the first from 1957 to 1965; then for 11 games during the 1968 season, before being hospitalized with appendicitis; and then returning for another 53 games from the end of the 1968 season through the beginning of the 1969 season. Les Moss served as interim manager for two games in 1968, replacing Eddie Stanky before being replaced by Lopez. After Lopez was hospitalized later that season, Moss took over as manager again for 34 games before Lopez returned. Hall of Famer Frank Chance was hired to manage the team for the 1924 but illness forced him to retire before managing any games. Eleven Hall of Famers have managed the White Sox: Griffith, Hugh Duffy, Collins, Evers, Ed Walsh, Ray Schalk, Ted Lyons, Lopez, Bob Lemon Larry Doby and Tony LaRussa. Lopez and LaRussa were elected as manager; the others were elected as players.

List of Major League Baseball players with a .400 batting average in a season

In baseball, batting average (AVG) is a measure of a batter's success rate in achieving a hit during an at bat, and is calculated by dividing a player's hits by his at bats. The achievement of a .400 batting average in a season is recognized as "the standard of hitting excellence", in light of how batting .300 in a season is already regarded as solid. Twenty players have recorded a batting average of at least .400 in a single Major League Baseball (MLB) season as of 2018, the last being Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox in 1941. Three players – Ed Delahanty, Ty Cobb and Rogers Hornsby – have accomplished the feat in three different seasons, and no player has ever hit over .440, a single-season record established by Hugh Duffy in 1894. Ross Barnes was the first player to bat .400 in a season, posting a .429 batting average in the National League's inaugural 1876 season.In total, 20 players have reached the .400 mark in MLB history and five have done so more than once. Of these, ten were right-handed batters, nine were left-handed, and one was a switch hitter, meaning he could bat from either side of the plate. Two of these players (Terry and Williams) played for only one major league team. The Philadelphia Phillies are the only franchise to have four players reach the milestone while on their roster: Delahanty, Billy Hamilton, Sam Thompson, and Tuck Turner, all of whom attained a batting average over .400 during the 1894 season. Three players won the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in the same year as their .400 season. Tip O'Neill, Nap Lajoie, and Hornsby are the only players to have earned the Triple Crown alongside achieving a .400 batting average, leading their respective leagues in batting average, home runs and runs batted in (RBI). Although Shoeless Joe Jackson's .408 batting average in 1911 did not earn him the American League's batting title, it established a major league record for a rookie that stands to this day. Fred Dunlap has the lowest career batting average among players who have batted .400 in a season with .292, while Cobb – with .366 – recorded the highest career average in major league history.Due to the 75 years that have elapsed since Williams became the last player to achieve the feat and the integral changes to the way the game of baseball is played since then – such as the increased utilization of specialized relief pitchers – a writer for The Washington Post called the mark "both mystical and unattainable". Consequently, modern day attempts to reach the hallowed mark by Rod Carew (.388 in 1977), George Brett (.390 in 1980) and Tony Gwynn (.394 in the strike-shortened 1994 season) have generated considerable hype among fans and in the media. Of the seventeen players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame who have batted .400 in a season, fourteen have been elected and two were elected on the first ballot. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played in at least 10 MLB seasons, and have either been retired for five seasons or deceased for at least six months. These requirements leave two players ineligible – Barnes and Turner – who did not play in at least 10 seasons. Shoeless Joe Jackson is ineligible for the Hall of Fame because he was permanently banned from baseball in 1921 for his involvement in the Black Sox Scandal.

Major League Baseball batters who have won the Triple Crown
BBWAA Vote
Veterans Committee
Pitchers
Catchers
First basemen
Second basemen
Third basemen
Shortstops
Outfielders
Designated hitters
Managers
Executives /
pioneers
Umpires
Inducted as a Phillie
Inductees who played for the Phillies
Phillies' managers
Phillies' executives
Frick Award
Spink Award
1876–1899
1900–1941

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