Huff-Daland XHB-1

The Huff-Daland XHB-1 "Cyclops" was a 1920s American prototype heavy bomber designed and built by the Huff-Daland company.[1]

The XHB-1 was designed as an enlarged version of the earlier LB-1 powered by a single 750 hp Packard 2A-2540 nose-mounted engine. It had a crew of four and had a 4000 lb bomb load. The Army decided not to order the Cyclops into production as it had decided single-engined aircraft were not suitable for the role.

A twin-engined version was developed as the XB-1 Super Cyclops.[2]

XHB-1 "Cyclops"
Huff-Daland HB-1
Role Heavy single-engined bomber
National origin United States
Manufacturer Huff-Daland
Primary user United States Army Air Corps
Number built 1
Variants Huff-Daland XB-1

Operators

 United States
United States Army Air Corps

Specifications (XHB-1)

Data from [3]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, rear gunner, navigator/ventral gunner)
  • Length: 59 ft 7 in (18.17 m)
  • Wingspan: 84 ft 7 in (25.79 m)
  • Height: 17 ft 2 in (5.23 m)
  • Gross weight: 16834 lb (7636 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Packard 2A-2540, 750 hp (560 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 109 mph (175 km/h)

See also

Related lists

References

Notes
  1. ^ Andrade 1979, p 128
  2. ^ Orbis 1985, page 2255
  3. ^ "Huff-Daland XHB-1". National Museum of the US Air Force. Archived from the original on 2013-10-23. Retrieved 2017-07-14.
Bibliography
  • Andrade, John. U.S. Military Aircraft Designations and Serials since 1909. Leicester: Midland Counties Publications, 1979. ISBN 0-904597-22-9.
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982–1985). London: Orbis Publishing, 1985.
Curtiss B-2 Condor

The Curtiss B-2 Condor was a 1920s United States bomber aircraft. It was a descendant of the Martin NBS-1, which was built by the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company for the Glenn L. Martin Company. There were a few differences, such as stronger materials and different engines, but they were relatively minor.

Huff-Daland Aero Corporation

Formed as Ogdensburg Aeroway Corp in 1920 in Ogdensburg, New York by Thomas Huff and Elliot Daland, its name was quickly changed to Huff-Daland Aero Corp and then in 1925 it was changed again to the Huff-Daland Aero Company with its main headquarters in Bristol, Pennsylvania. Huff-Daland produced a series of biplanes as trainers, observation planes, and light bombers for the U.S. Army and Navy.

From 1923-1924, Huff-Daland developed the first aircraft designed for crop dusting and began selling and promoting the new service through a subsidiary Huff Daland Dusters founded on March 2, 1925. Though acquisitions beginning in 1928, the dusting subsidiary became a founding component of Delta Air Lines.In 1927, the corporation was taken over by Hayden, Stone & Company, a New York City brokerage firm and in the course of the merger it became the Huff-Daland Division of the Keystone Aircraft Corporation. A single example of the Huff-Daland XB-1 bomber became the Keystone XB-1B, after its original Packard 2A-1500 engines were replaced with Curtiss V-1570-5 "Conqueror" engines. The Improved -B aircraft had better performance than the original, but still didn't compare favorably to the other aircraft of the period and never entered production.

Keystone merged with the Loening Company in 1928. By 1931, Keystone had become the Keystone Aircraft Division of the Curtiss-Wright Corporation.

Huff-Daland XB-1

The Huff-Daland XB-1 was a prototype bomber aircraft built for the United States Army Air Corps.

The XB-1 was the first aircraft named using just a B- designation. Prior to 1926, the U.S. Army used LB- and HB- prefixes, signifying 'Light Bomber' and 'Heavy Bomber'. The first XB-1, called the Super-Cyclops by Huff-Daland, was an extension of the earlier Huff-Daland XHB-1 'Cyclops'. It was essentially the same in size, but sported a twin tail and twin engines.

Martin XLB-4

The Martin XLB-4 was a 1920s proposal for a light bomber by the Glenn L. Martin Company.

Packard 1A-2500

The Packard 1A-2500 is an American V-12 liquid-cooled aircraft engine designed by Packard in 1924 as a successor to the World War I-era Liberty L-12. Five aero variants were produced, of which the 3A-2500 was the most numerous. Three marine versions, used most prominently in American World War II PT-boats, the 3M-2500, 4M-2500, and 5M-2500, were also derived from it.

USAAS/USAAC/USAAF/USAF bomber designations, Army/Air Force and Tri-Service systems
Original sequences
(1924–1930)
Main sequence
(1930–1962)
Long-range Bomber
(1935–1936)
Non-sequential
Tri-Service sequence
(1962–current)

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