Howard Mudd

Howard Edward Mudd (born February 10, 1942) is a former offensive lineman and offensive line coach in the National Football League (NFL). From 1998–2009, he was the offensive line coach for the Indianapolis Colts, with whom he won Super Bowl XLI. He played seven seasons for the San Francisco 49ers and the Chicago Bears from 1964 to 1970 in the National Football League. Mudd was a three-time Pro Bowler in 1966, 1967 and 1968. He retired in 1971 due to a knee injury, and began his coaching career at the University of California the following year.

Mudd attended Midland High School and Michigan State University. While at Michigan State he joined Delta Tau Delta International Fraternity.[1] Mudd played football for Hillsdale College from 1960-63 where he was a starting guard and a team captain. His play at the school led to his induction into the NAIA Hall of Fame.[2]

For his work as an assistant coach, Mudd earned the Pro Football Writers of America Lifetime Achievement Award.[3]

Howard Mudd
Indianapolis Colts
Position:Offensive guard
Personal information
Born:February 10, 1942 (age 77)
Midland, Michigan
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:254 lb (115 kg)
Career information
High school:Midland (Midland, Michigan)
College:Hillsdale
Michigan State
NFL Draft:1964 / Round: 9 / Pick: 113
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:93
Games started:56
Seasons:7
Player stats at NFL.com

Coaching career

Mudd pursued a coaching career following his retirement as a NFL player. He spent two years as an assistant coach at the University of California, before moving to the NFL, and coaching for the San Diego Chargers, San Francisco 49ers, Seattle Seahawks, Cleveland Browns and Kansas City Chiefs between 1974-1997.

He then joined the Indianapolis Colts as an offensive line coach, where he coached from 1998-2009. During his 12 years in Indianapolis, the Colts allowed the fewest sacks in the NFL, with just 218 sacks in 182 games. This is especially impressive when the high number of passing plays the Colts attempted during that time period was taken into account. Peyton Manning played for the Colts for 11 of those 12 years, and credits much of his success to the protection he's received from Mudd's front line.[4]

On May 6, 2009, ESPN reported that Mudd had filed his retirement papers due to a change in the NFL's pension program.[5] On May 20, 2009, Mudd returned to the team as the senior offensive line coach. Mudd planned to retire for good following the Colts' game against the New Orleans Saints in Super Bowl XLIV.[6]

In May 2010, Mudd and New Orleans Saints offensive line coach Aaron Kromer were together for a coaching clinic in Cincinnati, at which time Kromer approached Mudd about serving as a temporary consultant with the Saints. Mudd first advised the Saints during the 2010 offseason, then returned for the opening of training camp. In reference to his association with the Saints, Mudd said "He (Kromer) asked me to come down and spend a little time, and I said, 'OK'. I'll only be here a couple of days. That's it."[7]

Mudd was named the offensive line coach for the Philadelphia Eagles after being talked out of retirement on February 2, 2011.[8] In Mudd's first season with the Eagles, they allowed 17 fewer sacks than they had the previous season, and helped LeSean McCoy lead the NFL in total touchdowns.[9] Mudd retired at the conclusion of the 2012 season.

On February 7, 2019 the Indianapolis Colts have signed Howard Mudd as senior offensive assistant.[10]

References

  1. ^ The Rainbow, vol. 132, no. 4, p. 26
  2. ^ Eagles Media Guide, http://legacy.philadelphiaeagles.com/eagles_files/html/coach_mudd_1.html
  3. ^ http://mmqb.si.com/2014/06/09/jay-cutler-marc-trestman-bears-locker-room-dr-z/6
  4. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4143964
  5. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4147407
  6. ^ http://www.cleveland.com/sports/index.ssf/2010/02/title_game_a_cool_finale_for_c.html
  7. ^ http://www.indystar.com/article/20100802/SPORTS03/8020344/1004/SPORTS/Ex-Colts-coach-Mudd-lends-hand-to-Saints
  8. ^ http://articles.philly.com/2011-05-03/sports/29499238_1_eagles-linemen-stacy-andrews-eagles-guard-todd-herremans
  9. ^ http://www.mlive.com/sports/saginaw/index.ssf/2012/01/philadelphia_eagles_bring_back.html
  10. ^ "Colts Bring Back Howard Mudd To Staff; Klayton Adams Named Assistant Offensive Line Coach". www.colts.com. Retrieved 2019-02-07.

External links

1967 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1967. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1967 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1967 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 18th year with the National Football League. The 49ers had two first round picks and drafted Heisman Trophy winner Steve Spurrier with one of those draft picks.

1968 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1968 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 19th year with the National Football League.

1969 Chicago Bears season

The 1969 Chicago Bears season was their 50th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 1–13 record, the worst in franchise history. This occurred despite the exploits of Dick Butkus and Gale Sayers. Sayers had torn the ligaments in his right knee during the 1968 season. After surgery, Sayers went through a physical rehabilitation program with the help of teammate Brian Piccolo. In 1969 Sayers led the league in rushing once again with 1,032 yards, but he lacked the speed he once had and averaged only 4.4 yards per carry. An already poor season was made even worse when running back Piccolo was diagnosed with cancer in November. He would succumb to the disease in June of the following year.

1970 Chicago Bears season

The 1970 Chicago Bears season was their 51st regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–8 record, another below .500 showing, but a significant improvement over their 1–13 record of the previous season.

1977 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1977 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 28th season in the National Football League (NFL). Hoping to build off an 8-6 campaign one season ago, the team struggled and was again unable to qualify for the playoffs, this time posting a record of 5–9, including starting the season 0–5.

1984 Cleveland Browns season

The 1984 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 35th season with the National Football League. At the season's mid-way point, head coach Sam Rutigliano was fired after starting 1–7. He was replaced by defensive coordinator Marty Schottenheimer, who went 4–4 to finish the season. (Schottenheimer would coach the Browns until 1988, guiding the Browns to a .620 winning percentage in his tenure with the team.)

1990 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1990 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 21st season in the National Football League, the 38th as the Kansas City Chiefs and the 31st overall. they improved from an 8-7-1 record to an 11–5 record and Wild Card spot in the 1991 playoffs. In Marty Schottenheimer's first playoff appearance with the Chiefs, they lost to the Miami Dolphins 17–16 in the Wild Card round. Starting with the home opener, the Chiefs began an NFL-record 18-straight seasons with every home game sold out. The streak was finally broken in the final home game of the 2009 Kansas City Chiefs season versus Cleveland.

1992 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1992 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 23rd season in the National Football League and the 33rd overall. The Chiefs matched their 10–6 record from 1991, but were shut out by the San Diego Chargers 17–0 in the Wild Card round.

During the season; the Chiefs wore a “WWD” patch on their jerseys in tribute to vice president of player personnel Whitey Dovell, who died in May 1992.

1998 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1998 Indianapolis Colts season was the 46th season for the team in the National Football League and 15th in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Colts finished the National Football League's 1998 season with a record of 3 wins and 13 losses, and finished fifth in the AFC East division.

Coming off a 3–13 season the year before, the Colts drafted quarterback Peyton Manning with the first overall pick. Manning would mark the beginning of a new era for the Colts, as he would lead them to their 2nd Super Bowl title 9 years later.

This season was Marshall Faulk's last with the Colts as he was traded to the St. Louis Rams in the off-season. He had his best seasons in St. Louis, helping the Rams to two Super Bowls in 1999 and 2001 and winning the league's MVP in 2000.

2001 Indianapolis Colts season

The 2001 Indianapolis Colts season was the 49th season for the team in the National Football League and 18th in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Colts finished the National Football League's 2001 season with a record of 6 wins and 10 losses, and finished fourth in the AFC East division. In the process the Colts allowed 486 points in sixteen games, an average of 30 points per match and the franchise worst since the infamous 1981 Colts who allowed 533. At the time only the aforementioned Colts, the 1980 Saints and the notorious 1966 Giants (in a 14-game schedule) had ever allowed more points. This would be the last time the Colts would miss the playoffs until 2011.

2011 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 2011 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 79th season in the National Football League, and the thirteenth under head coach Andy Reid. The Eagles had high hopes of competing for a Super Bowl, with several notable offseason acquisitions; however, they ultimately failed to improve on their 10-6 record from 2010 and missed the playoffs for the first time since 2007. However, they did win their last 4 games, in an attempt to pull out a miracle playoff berth, finishing 8–8, only 1 game behind the divisional winners and eventual Super Bowl champions, the New York Giants, and they swept the Dallas Cowboys and Washington Redskins for the first time since 2006 and 2009, respectively. The Eagles played all their home games at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

2019 Indianapolis Colts season

The 2019 season will be the Indianapolis Colts' upcoming 67th in the National Football League and their 36th in Indianapolis. It is also their second season under head coach Frank Reich and third under the leadership of general manager Chris Ballard.

Jason Kelce

Jason Kelce (; born November 5, 1987) is an American football center for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Eagles in the sixth round of the 2011 NFL Draft. He played college football at Cincinnati. Kelce is a Super Bowl champion, two time Pro-Bowler and is a two time First Team All-Pro.

List of Hillsdale College alumni

This is a list of notable Hillsdale College alumni.

Will Carleton (1869), poet

Cyrus Cline (1876), member of the United States House of Representatives from Indiana

Solomon Robert Dresser (1865), member of the United States House of Representatives from Pennsylvania; founder and president of S.R. Dresser Manufacturing Co., now Dresser Industries

Spencer O. Fisher (c. 1865), member of the United States House of Representatives from Michigan's 10th congressional district

Clinton B. Fisk (c. 1844), Civil War soldier and statesman; namesake of Fisk University; Prohibition Party candidate for president in 1888; first inductee into the Hillsdale County, Michigan Veteran's Hall of Fame in 2001

Washington Gardner (1870), Civil War soldier and statesman

Albert J. Hopkins (1870), senator from Illinois

Moses A. Luce (1866), lawyer; Medal of Honor recipient for service in the Civil War

Jasper Packard (c. 1853), newspaper editor and U.S. Representative from IndianaLaMarcus Adna Thompson (1866), engineer and inventor, known as the "Father of the Gravity Ride" for his roller coaster patents

Rose Hartwick Thorpe (c. 1872), poetSpencer G. Millard (1877), Lieutenant Governor of California

Joseph B. Moore (1879), justice on the Michigan Supreme Court

May Gorslin Preston Slosson (BS 1878, MS 1879), educator and suffragist, first woman Philosophy PhD in the U.S.

Bion J. Arnold (1884), expert in mass transportation, called the "Father of the Third Rail"

Jared Maurice Arter (1885), slavery-born African-American pastor and educator

Chester Hardy Aldrich (1888), one-term governor of Nebraska; justice on the Nebraska Supreme Court

Ulysses Grant Baker Pierce (1891), Unitarian minister and Chaplain of the Senate from 1909 to 1913

Leroy Waterman (1898), archaeologist, scholar, and Biblical translator

Henry M. Kimball (c. 1900), member of the United States House of Representatives from Michigan's 3rd congressional district

Lynn Bell (1906), minor-league professional baseball player, college football coach

Verner Main (1907), member of the United States House of Representatives from Michigan

Harry Bidwell Ansted (1913), US Army chaplain; first president of the Seoul National University

Elizebeth Friedman (1915), female pioneer of American cryptography

E. Ross Adair (1929), member of the United States House of Representatives from Indiana

Walter R. Nickel (1929), dermatologist, a founder of the field of dermatopathology

Fred Knorr (1937), radio executive and former part-owner of the Detroit Tigers

Phil Crane (1952), former member of the United States House of Representatives from Illinois's 8th congressional district

Robert William Davis (1952), former member of the United States House of Representatives from Michigan's 11th congressional district

Dan Crane (1958), former member of the United States House of Representatives from Illinois's 22nd and 19th congressional districts

Wayne Schurr (1959), relief pitcher for the Chicago Cubs during the 1964 season

Bob Clark (1963), filmmaker, most famous for directing A Christmas Story and Porky's

Spanky McFarland (1976), college baseball coach at Northern Illinois and James Madison

Howard Mudd (1963), offensive line coach for Philadelphia Eagles

Bud Acton (c. 1964), NBA player with the San Diego Rockets in the 1967-68 season

David L. Cornwell (1964), former member of the United States House of Representatives from Indiana

David Pringle (1965), president of Luminys Systems Corp., chief technology officer of Imagility, Inc., winner of two Academy Awards and one Emmy Award for technical achievement

Bruce McLenna (1966), former halfback for the Detroit Lions and Kansas City Chiefs

Chuck Liebrock (1967), former offensive lineman in the Canadian Football League with the Toronto Argonauts and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers

Chester Marcol (1972), former placekicker for the Green Bay Packers and Houston Oilers

Manuel Ayau (1973), Guatemalan-born politician, humanitarian, and founder of the "Universidad Francisco Marroquín"

Ron Tripp (c. 1975), expert in Sambo and Judo and current general secretary of USA Judo

Peter Leithart (1981), reformed theologian

Chris Chocola (1984), former member of the United States House of Representatives from Indiana's 2nd congressional district and board member of the Club for Growth

Beth Walker (1987), Justice of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

Ruta Sepetys (1989), author of New York Times bestseller Between Shades of Gray

Tom Heckert (1990), former general manager for the Cleveland Browns

Erik Prince (1992), former U.S. Navy Seal, founder and former owner and CEO of private-security firm Blackwater, renamed Xe in 2009

David Viviano (1994), justice on the Michigan Supreme Court

Thomas Morrison (1997), representative for the 54th District in the Illinois General Assembly

Robert P. Murphy (1998), economist and author

Brent Weeks (2000), author of The Night Angel Trilogy and the Lightbringer series

Peter Leeson (2001), economist

Aric Nesbitt (2001), member of Michigan House of Representatives, 66th district

Tyler Blanski (2006), author and musician

Hans Zeiger (2007), author and representative for the 25th Legislative District of Washington

Michael Sessions (2010), former mayor of Hillsdale, Michigan, one of the youngest mayors ever elected in the U.S.

Katherine Timpf (2010), journalist and comedian

Jared Veldheer (2010), NFL offensive lineman for the Denver Broncos

Andre Holmes (2011), wide receiver for the Buffalo Bills

Mudd

Mudd is a surname, and may refer to:

Daniel Mudd (born 1956), American CEO, son of Roger Mudd

Harvey Seeley Mudd (1888–1955), American mining engineer, namesake of Harvey Mudd College

Howard Mudd (born 1942), American football player and coach

Richard Mudd (1901–2002), grandson of Samuel Mudd

Roger Mudd (born 1928), U.S. television journalist

Samuel Mudd (1833–1883), physician who set John Wilkes Booth's broken leg

Seeley G. Mudd (1895–1968), California physician whose foundation allowed for the construction of several academic halls in U.S. colleges and universities

Seeley W. Mudd (1861–1926), American mining engineer, father of Harvey Seeley Mudd and Seeley G. MuddFictional characters

Harry Mudd, who appears in Star Trek: The Original Series and Star Trek: The Animated Series

Lt. Mudd, a character in Joseph Heller's novel Catch-22

Millicent Mudd

National Football League 1960s All-Decade Team

This is a list of National Football League (NFL) players who had outstanding performances throughout the 1960s and have been compiled together into this fantasy group. The team was selected by voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame at the end of the decade.

Tom Moore (American football coach)

Tom Moore (born November 7, 1938) is an American football coach and former college player who recently worked as the assistant head coach and offensive consultant for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL).

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.