Howard Cassady

Howard Albert "Hopalong" Cassady (born March 2, 1934) is a former professional American football running back. He won the Heisman Trophy in 1955 and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1979. He played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for eight seasons, seven of them for the Detroit Lions, with whom he won the 1957 NFL Championship Game.

Hopalong Cassady
Howard Cassady (1953 Makio)
No. 40, 41
Position:Halfback, split end
Personal information
Born:March 2, 1934 (age 85)
Columbus, Ohio
Height:5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight:183 lb (83 kg)
Career information
High school:Columbus (OH) Central
College:Ohio State
NFL Draft:1956 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life

Cassady was born in Columbus, Ohio and attended the now closed Central High School.

College career

Cassady played football for the Ohio State Buckeyes from 1952 to 1955. During his college career, he scored 37 touchdowns in 36 games. He also played defensive back; a pass was never completed on him in his four years at the university. He was twice selected as a consensus All-American, in 1954 and 1955. The 1954 Buckeyes finished the season 10–0 and won a consensus national championship. That year Cassady finished third in the vote for the Heisman Trophy behind Alan Ameche of Wisconsin. In 1955, Cassady won the Heisman Trophy (by the largest margin at the time), the Maxwell Award, and was named the Associated Press Athlete of the Year. During his playing days, Cassady was 5'10" and 170 pounds.

Cassady earned the nickname "Hopalong" during his first game as a freshman for Ohio State. Columbus sportswriters who saw him play said he "hopped all over the field like the performing cowboy", a reference to the fictional character Hopalong Cassidy. In that game Cassady came off the bench to score three touchdowns in a win over Indiana University.

During an Ohio State practice in 1953 Cassady was having some issues executing an off tackle run. At this point Coach Hayes told Cassady to take a seat and brought in the back up running back Robert Croce. Robert Croce executed the play flawlessly and carried the ball for 20+ yards. Coach Hayes then said to Cassady, "Cassady, did you see that Croce was just slow enough to hit the hole. You're hitting the line too fast!"

Cassady held some Ohio State career records for many years following his graduation. He held the career rushing record (2,466 yards) until he was surpassed by Jim Otis in 1969, the career all-purpose yards record (4,403 yards) until he was surpassed by Archie Griffin in 1974, and the scoring record (222 points) until he was surpassed by Pete Johnson in 1975.

Cassady also played baseball for Ohio State. He led the team in home runs in 1955 and in stolen bases in 1956. While at Ohio State, he also became a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity.

Cassady is a member of The Pigskin Club Of Washington, D.C. National Intercollegiate All-American Football Players Honor Roll.

Professional career

Cassady played nine seasons in the National Football League: seven for the Detroit Lions, and one each for the Cleveland Browns and the Philadelphia Eagles. In the NFL, Cassady was an all-purpose back, playing both the receiver and the running back positions. In doing so, he scored twenty-seven touchdowns in his career.

After football

After retiring from football, Cassady became an entrepreneur; he formed a company manufacturing concrete pipe. More recently, he has served as a scout for the New York Yankees baseball team, and as the first base coach for their former AAA affiliate, the Columbus Clippers.

His son, Craig Cassady, played defensive back at Ohio State, and played briefly for the New Orleans Saints in the 1970s.[1]

References

  1. ^ "Craig Cassady Stats - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.

External links

1953 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1953 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP), United Press (UP) and the International News Service (INS) for the 1953 Big Ten Conference football season.

1954 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1954 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1954 Big Ten Conference football season.

1954 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1954 Big Ten Conference football season was the 59th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1954 college football season.

The 1954 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, won the conference football championship, compiled a 10–0, was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll, and defeated USC in the 1955 Rose Bowl. Halfback Howard Cassady was selected as the team's most valuable player and was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1954 Wisconsin Badgers football team, under head coach Ivy Williamson, compiled a 7–2 record and was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll. Fullback Alan Ameche won the 1954 Heisman Trophy as the best player in college football and the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the most valuable player in the Big Ten Conference. Ameche broke Ollie Matson's career rushing record, finishing his tenure at Wisconsin with 3,212 rushing yards.Purdue quarterback Len Dawson led the conference with 1,464 passing yards.

1954 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 1954 Ohio State Buckeyes football team represented the Ohio State University in the 1954 Big Ten Conference football season. The team was led by quarterback Dave Leggett and captains John Borton and Dick Brubaker. They were the second national title team in Ohio State football history. They were coached by Hall of Fame coach Woody Hayes. The Buckeyes were awarded the title by the AP Poll and represented the Big Ten Conference in the Rose Bowl.

The Buckeyes finished the 1953 season with a record of 6–3. They were ranked #20 in the preseason AP Poll, but dropped out of the first in-season poll, which was issued before their season opener. However, six weeks later, the Buckeyes had risen to the top of the AP Poll. Their rise from unranked to #1 in six weeks stood as an AP Poll record for 60 years until being broken by Mississippi State in 2014. The Buckeyes defeated six ranked teams to capture their first league title under fourth year Coach Hayes.

Led by their powerful defense, the Bucks beat the #2 Wisconsin Badgers and their eventual Heisman Trophy winner Alan Ameche on an 88-yard interception return by Howard "Hopalong" Cassady, who won the award the following year. The Buckeye defense forced 35 turnovers during the season and allowed only two teams to score more than one touchdown

In their game against the Michigan Wolverines, the Bucks held a goal-line stand and then drove 99 yards for a touchdown. The AP Poll declared the Bucks to be number one while the UPI Coaches Poll opted for the 9–0, Pacific Coast Conference champion the UCLA Bruins. However, because of the "no repeat rule" the Bruins were locked out of the Rose Bowl leaving the Buckeyes to play second place USC.

The 1955 Rose Bowl was played during a rainstorm in poor field conditions. However, Ohio State managed to gain 304 yards and hold the Trojans to only six first downs. USC's only score came on an 86-yard punt return. The team finished 10–0 for the first time in school history.

1955 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1955 Big Ten Conference football season was the 60th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1955 college football season.

The 1955 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, won the Big Ten football championship with a record of 7–2 and was ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll. Halfback Howard Cassady was a consensus first-team All-American and won both the 1955 Heisman Trophy as the best player in college football and the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the most valuable player in the Big Ten.

The 1955 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Duffy Daugherty, compiled a 9–1 record, defeated UCLA in the 1956 Rose Bowl, and was ranked No. 2 behind Oklahoma in the final AP Poll. Quarterback Earl Morrall was a consensus first-team All-American and was the first Big Ten player selected in the 1956 NFL Draft with the second overall pick. Tackle Norm Masters was also a first-team All-American.

The 1955 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bennie Oosterbaan, compiled a 7–2 record and was ranked No. 12 in the final AP Poll. In the second week of the season, the Wolverines defeated Michigan State, the Spartans' only loss of the season. The Wolverines rose to No. 1 in the AP Poll after defeating Army (ranked No. 6), but after starting the season 6-0, Michigan lost to Illinois on November 5, 1955. End Ron Kramer was a consensus first-team All-American.

Iowa guard Cal Jones won the Outland Trophy as the best interior lineman in college football. He was the first Big Ten player to receive the award.

1955 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 1955 Ohio State Buckeyes football team represented the Ohio State University in the 1955 Big Ten Conference football season. The Buckeyes compiled a 7–2 record.

1957 NFL Championship Game

The 1957 National Football League championship game was the 25th annual championship game, held on December 29 at Briggs Stadium in Detroit, Michigan.The Detroit Lions (8–4), winners of the Western Conference, hosted the Cleveland Browns (9–2–1), champions of the Eastern Conference. Detroit had won the regular season game 20–7 three weeks earlier on December 8, also at Briggs Stadium, but lost quarterback Bobby Layne with a broken right ankle late in the first half. Reserve quarterback Tobin Rote, a starter the previous year with Green Bay, filled in for Layne and won that game with Cleveland, the next week at Chicago, and the tiebreaker playoff game at San Francisco.

It was the fourth pairing of the two teams in the championship game; they met previously in 1952, 1953, and 1954. The Browns were favored by three points, but the home underdog Lions scored two touchdowns in each quarter and won in a rout, 59–14.Until 2006, this was the last time that major professional teams from Michigan and Ohio met in a postseason series or game. As of 2018, this was the last playoff game played in the city of Detroit other than Super Bowl XL in 2006. The Lions other two home playoff games since 1957 (1991 and 1993) were played at the Pontiac Silverdome in nearby Pontiac, Michigan.

1962 Cleveland Browns season

The 1962 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 13th season with the National Football League.

Bill Hess

William R. Hess (February 5, 1923 – June 10, 1978) was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Ohio University from 1958 to 1977. In his tenure as head coach for the Ohio Bobcats football team, Hess compiled a 108–91–4 record, ranking him second only to coach Don Peden on Ohio's all-time victories list. Hess's teams won four Mid-American Conference (MAC) championships (1960, 1963, 1967, and 1968) and won a National Small College Championship in 1960 after having an undefeated season. Hess also led the Bobcats to two bowl games, losing 15–14 to West Texas State in the 1962 Sun Bowl and losing 49–42 to Richmond in the 1968 Tangerine Bowl. His 1968 team is the only team in school history to finish ranked in the major polls. Hess was a native of Columbus, Ohio. He coached high school football in Portsmouth and Grandview Heights, Ohio before joining Woody Hayes's staff at Ohio State University in 1951.

Cassady

Cassady is both a surname and a given name, a variant of the name Cassidy. Notable people with the name include:

Surname:

Carolyn Cassady (1923–2013), American writer

John Cassaday, American comic book writer-artist

Harry Cassady, American baseball player

Howard Cassady, American football player

John H. Cassady, American admiral

Neal Cassady, American writer

Thomas Cassady, American soldierGiven name:

Cassady Lance, American beauty queenFictional characters:

Nina Cassady, police detective on Law & Order

Esco Sarkkinen

Esco "Sark" Sarkkinen (April 9, 1918 – February 28, 1998) was an American football player and coach. He played college football at Ohio State University from 1937 to 1939 and was a consensus first-team end on the 1939 College Football All-America Team. He also served as an assistant coach for the Ohio State Buckeyes football team from 1946 to 1978.

Hubert Bobo

Hubert Lee Bobo (July 2, 1934 – September 1, 1999) was an American football linebacker. He played college football at Ohio State, and played professionally in the American Football League for the Los Angeles Chargers in 1960 and for the New York Titans from 1961–1962. Hubert also played professionally in the Canadian Football League during the 1958 season as a member of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. Prior to his professional career Bobo was a dominating force in high school football as a running back, linebacker, and kicker. Bobo still to this day holds several state of Ohio and national records for his efforts at the high school level. After his high school career ended, Bobo attended The Ohio State University sharing a backfield with Bobby Watkins and Howard "Hopalong" Cassady helping lead the Buckeyes to an undefeated season and the 1954 National Championship.

Jim Parker (American football)

James Thomas Parker (April 3, 1934 – July 18, 2005) was an American football player. He played college football at Ohio State University from 1954 to 1956 and in the National Football League (NFL) with the Baltimore Colts from 1957 to 1967. Parker was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1973 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1974.

Jim Swink

Jim Swink (March 14, 1936 – December 3, 2014) was an All-American halfback at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas.

Swink grew up in Rusk, Texas, and was uncircumcised, which led to his nickname, "The Rusk Rambler". He is remembered as one of the all-time greatest running backs in Southwest Conference history, and led the Horned Frogs to consecutive conference championships in 1955 and 1956, which resulted in trips to the Cotton Bowl Classic.

While he was named an All-American as a junior and senior, his best season came as a junior in 1955. That year, he rushed for 1,283 yards, which was second-best in the nation, and led the country with 125 points scored. His best game came against rival Texas in Austin, when he rushed 15 times for 235 yards and scored 26 points in a 47-20 rout of the Longhorns. That year, he finished second to Howard Cassady of Ohio State in the voting for the Heisman Trophy.

After finishing his degree at TCU, he decided to forgo playing in the National Football League and instead went to medical school. In 1960, he joined the American Football League's Dallas Texans for their inaugural season.

According to the book June 17, 1967 Battle of Xom Bi by David Hearne (page 192....)

The presence of thirty-one-year-old Captain James E. Swink, our battalion surgeon, was an additional blessing for our wounded men as they were pulled out of the wood line. During battalion size operations, operations, Swink would often travel with us to the field. He had been assigned to the Black Lions after a five-month stint at the 12th Evacuation Hospital in Cu Chi, Vietnam. He was there in the aftermath of the battle helping the medics with the wounded. Jim Swink was from Rusk, Texas. He had been a famed player in his earlier years earning him the moniker "the Rusk Rambler" as he led TCU to consecutive conference championships and Cotton Bowl appearances. In fact, Captain Swink was a two time “All American” halfback who finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1955. After graduating from TCU, he rejected an NFL career even though drafted by the Chicago Bears. In numerous interviews, Swink stated he had been Inspired by a physician in Rusk, Texas to pursue a medical career.[ 11] It must have been a difficult decision because Swink had proven

himself a formidable football player. He had led the nation in scoring and placed second in rushing in 1955. He got to play against Jim Brown and Swink’s team won. He is also remembered for being the object of the University of Texas expression, “Hook em Horns.”[ 12] Prior to the November 12, 1955, game Texas students had come up with the oft-heard phrase in the hopes of unsettling Swink and his team, the Horned Frogs, but it didn’t work. Even with thousands of Texas students screaming “Hook em horns,” Swink still played one of his best games, rushing for 235 yards on 15 carries for a 15.7-yard average and scored a school-record of 26 points. The Frogs trounced the Longhorns, 47-20 that afternoon.

Captain Swink also fought hard for us, and though he had little in the field to work with, just his presence was comforting to us and especially to the medics. With James Swink around there was someone to go to when a wfor them. Ross Phillips said Swink was accessible and didn’t play the rank game. He said Swink was a fun guy who was always a dedicated doctor. During his tour he was wounded and received a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star metal for his outstanding contribution to the cause.ounded soldier was beyond what a medic felt capable of handling. Captain Swink did whatever he could with the little he had in the field. He said "We can give them some pain medication and start an IV on them or very rarely maybe a system with their airway and breathing.” His biggest goal as he stated, “You get them on a helicopter as fast as you can." In another photograph taken by AP photographer Henri Huet, it shows Captain Swink with his stethoscope dangling from his neck working hard on a wounded soldier. Opposite of him is a soldier with a cigarette hanging from his lips who appears to be assisting. In the background you can see other soldiers, one with his shirt off and two more, probably Jim Callahan and Mike Stout, working on another wounded soldier. The photograph appears to have been taken at a makeshift triage area. The medics liked Captain Swink and he had great respect for them. Ross Phillips said Swink was accessible and didn’t play the rank game. He said Swink was a fun guy who was always a dedicated doctor. During his tour he was wounded and received a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star metal for his outstanding contribution to the cause.

He later practiced medicine in Fort Worth as an orthopedic surgeon. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1980, and in 1982 was presented with a Silver Anniversary Award by the NCAA for career achievements outside of football. In 2005, he was awarded the Doak Walker Legends award.

Swink died December 3, 2014 at his home in Rusk, Texas due to complications of lymphoma. According to his wife he continued his medical practice until he became ill.

John H. Cassady

John Howard Cassady (April 3, 1896 – January 25, 1969) was an admiral in the United States Navy. He was Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean from 1954 to 1956. Prior to his assignment, Cassady had served as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air) from January 1950 to May 1952, Commander of USS Saratoga during World War II and Commander of Sixth Fleet from 1952 to 1954. He died in 1969 in Boca Raton, Florida.

List of people from Spencer, Indiana

The following is a list of notable people associated with Spencer, Indiana. These people were born or lived in Spencer.

Maxwell Award

The Maxwell Award is presented annually to the college football player judged by a panel of sportscasters, sportswriters, and National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and the membership of the Maxwell Football Club to be the best all-around in the United States. The award is named after Robert "Tiny" Maxwell, a Swarthmore College football player, coach and sportswriter. Johnny Lattner (1952, 1953) and Tim Tebow (2007, 2008) are the only players to have won the award twice. It is the college equivalent of the Bert Bell Award of the National Football League, also given out by the Maxwell Club.

Sporting News College Football Player of the Year

The Sporting News College Football Player of the Year award is given to the player of the year in college football as adjudged by Sporting News.

UPI College Football Player of the Year

The United Press International College Football Player of the Year Award was among the first and most recognized college football awards. With the second bankruptcy of UPI in 1991, along with that of its parent company, the award was discontinued. Offensive and defensive players were eligible. Unlike the Heisman, it was never affiliated with a civic organization or named after a player (like the Walter Camp Award). Like all UPI college awards at the time, it was based on the votes of NCAA coaches. Billy Cannon, O.J. Simpson, and Archie Griffin are the only two-time winners.

Howard Cassidy—championships, awards, and honors

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.