House of Normandy

  1. ^ The House of Normandy became extinct before the age of heraldry.

The House of Normandy is the usual designation for the family that were the Counts of Rouen, Dukes of Normandy and Kings of England which immediately followed the Norman conquest of England and lasted until the House of Plantagenet came to power in 1154. It included the Viking Rollo and his descendants, and William the Conqueror and his heirs down through 1135. After that it was disputed between William's grandchildren, Matilda, whose husband Geoffrey was the founder of the Angevin Dynasty, and Stephen of the House of Blois (or Blesevin dynasty).

The Norman counts of Rouen were:

The Norman dukes of Normandy were:

The Norman monarchs of England and Normandy were:

Norman Count of Flanders:

House of Normandy
Arms of William the Conqueror (1066-1087)
Arms of the duchy of Normandy[nb 1]
CountryFrance, England
Founded911
FounderRollo
Final rulerHenry I of England
Titles
Estate(s)Normandy, England, Flanders
Deposition1135
Cadet branchesIllegitimate lines:
  1. ^ The House of Normandy became extinct before the age of heraldry.

Family tree

Counts of Rouen and Dukes of Normandy shown in bold.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rollo
Count of Rouen 911–927
HOUSE OF NORMANDY
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William
‘Longsword’

Count of Rouen 927–942
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Richard I
‘the Fearless’

Duke of Normandy 942–996
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Richard II
‘the Good’

Duke of Normandy 996–1027
 
Robert
count of Évreux
 
Mauger
∞ Germain
countess of Corbeil
 
Geoffrey
count of Eu
BRANCH OF CLARE
 
William I
count of Eu
BRANCH OF EU
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Richard III
Duke of Normandy 1026-1027
 
Robert I
‘the Magnificent’

Duke of Normandy 1027–35
 
Richard
count of Évreux
 
Ralph
lord of Gacé
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William II (King William I)
‘the Conqueror’

Duke of Normandy 1035–87
King of England 1066–87
 
William
count of Évreux
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robert II
‘Curthose’

Duke of Normandy 1087–1106
 
Adela
m. Stephen II,
Count of Blois
 
Richard
 
William II
‘Rufus’

King of England 1087–1100
Ducal Regent 1096–1100
 
 
 
 
 
Henry I
‘Beauclerc’

King of England 1100–35
Duke of Normandy 1106–35
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William Clito
Count of Flanders
Ducal claimant
 
Stephen
King of England 1135–54
Duke of Normandy 1135–44
 
Henry V
king of Germany
HOUSE OF SALIANS
 
Matilda I
Lady of the English
 
Geoffrey, Count of Anjou
Duke of Normandy 1144–50
HOUSE OF PLANTAGENET
 
William III Adelin
Duke of Normandy 1120
in his father's lifetime
 
(illeg.)
Robert I
1st earl of Gloucester
 
(illeg.)
Richard of Lincoln
 
(illeg.)
Reginald
1st earl of Cornwall
 
(illeg.)
Robert FitzEdith
∞ Matilda d'Avranches
baroness of Okehampton
 
(illeg.)
Gilbert FitzRoy
 
(illeg.)
Henry FitzRoy
 
(illeg.)
Fulk FitzRoy<br>monk at Abingdon?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Henry II
Duke of Normandy 1150–89
King of England 1154–89
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William FitzRobert
2nd earl of Gloucester
 
Roger
bishop
 
(illeg.)
Richard
bishop of Bayeux
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Meiler Fitzhenry
Lord Chief Justice of Ireland
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Henry
‘the Young King’

Duke of Normandy 1170–83
in his father's lifetime
 
Richard IV (King Richard I)
‘Lionheart’

Duke of Normandy &
King of England 1189–99
 
John
‘Lackland’

Duke of Normandy &
King of England 1199–1216
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Henry III
Duke of Normandy 1216–59
(renounced at Treaty of Paris)
King of England 1216–72

References and notes

  1. ^ Matilda's inheritance was usurped by her cousin Stephen of England in 1135. She recovered Normandy, but ruled in England only in 1141 as Lady of the English. However, Matilda maintained her dynastic rights until she abdicated them in favour of her son Henry II of England in 1153 following the Treaty of Wallingford.

See also

House of Normandy
New title Ruling House of the Duchy of Normandy
911 – 1154
Succeeded by
House of Plantagenet
Preceded by
House of Wessex
Ruling House of the Kingdom of England
1066 – 1154
Preceded by
House of Estridsen
Ruling House of the County of Flanders
1127 – 1128
Succeeded by
House of Alsace
New title Ruling House of the County of Eu
996 – 1246
Succeeded by
House of Lusignan
Abbey of Sainte-Trinité, Caen

The Abbey of Sainte-Trinité (the Holy Trinity), also known as Abbaye aux Dames, is a former monastery of women in Caen, Normandy, now home to the Regional Council of Lower Normandy. The complex includes the Abbey Church of Sainte-Trinité.

Adela of France

Adela of France, known also as Adela the Holy or Adela of Messines; (1009 – 8 January 1079, Messines), was, by marriage, the Duchess of Normandy (January 1027 – August 1027), Countess of Flanders (1035–1067).

Counts of Eu

This is a list of the counts of Eu, a French fief in the Middle Ages.

Gerloc

Gerloc (or Geirlaug), baptised in Rouen as Adela (or Adèle) in 912, was the daughter of Rollo, of Normandy, Count of Rouen, and his wife, Poppa of Bayeux. She was the sister of William I Longsword of Normandy.

In 935, she married William Towhead, the future Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine. They had two children together before she died on 14 October 962:

William IV of Aquitaine

Adelaide of Aquitaine, wife of Hugh Capet

Gunnora

Gunnora (or Gunnor) (circa 936 – 5 Jan 1031) was a Duchess of Normandy by marriage to Richard I of Normandy.

Poppa of Bayeux

Poppa of Bayeux (born circa 880), was the Christian wife or mistress (perhaps more danico) of the Viking conqueror Rollo. She was the mother of William I Longsword, Gerloc and grandmother of Richard the Fearless, who forged the Duchy of Normandy into a great fief of medieval France. Dudo of Saint-Quentin, in his panegyric of the Norman dukes, describes her as the daughter of a "Count Berengar", the dominant prince of that region, who was captured at Bayeux by Rollo in 885 or 889, shortly after the siege of Paris. This has led to speculation that she was the daughter of Berengar II of Neustria.There are different opinions among medieval genealogy experts about Poppa's family. Christian Settipani says her parents were Guy de Senlis and Cunegundis, the daughter of Pepin, Count of Vermandois, and sister of Herbert I, Count of Vermandois. Katherine Keats-Rohan states she was the daughter of Berengar II of Neustria by Adelind, whose father was Henry, Margrave of the Franks, or Adela of Vermandois. Despite the uncertainty of her parentage, she undoubtedly was a member of the Frankish aristocracy. A statue of Poppa stands at the Place de Gaulle in Bayeux.

Richard, Count of Évreux

Richard, Count of Évreux (died 1067) was a powerful member of the Norman aristocracy during the reign of William the Conqueror.

Richard II, Duke of Normandy

Richard II (died 28 August 1026), called the Good (French: Le Bon), was the eldest son and heir of Richard I the Fearless and Gunnora. He was a Norman nobleman of the House of Normandy. He was the paternal grandfather of William the Conqueror.

Richard III, Duke of Normandy

Richard III (997/1001 – 6 August 1027) was the Duke of Normandy who reigned from August 1026 to his death. His brief reign opened with a revolt by his brother.

Richard I of Normandy

Richard I (28 August 932 – 20 November 996), also known as Richard the Fearless (French: Richard Sans-Peur; Old Norse: Jarl Richart), was the Count of Rouen or Jarl of Rouen from 942 to 996. Dudo of Saint-Quentin, whom Richard commissioned to write the "De moribus et actis primorum Normanniae ducum" (Latin, "On the Customs and Deeds of the First Dukes of Normandy"), called him a Dux. However, this use of the word may have been in the context of Richard's renowned leadership in war, and not as a reference to a title of nobility. Richard either introduced feudalism into Normandy or he greatly expanded it. By the end of his reign, the most important Norman landholders held their lands in feudal tenure.

Robert Curthose

Robert Curthose (c. 1051 – 3 February 1134), sometimes called Robert II, succeeded his father, William the Conqueror as Duke of Normandy in 1087 and reigned until 1106. Robert was also an unsuccessful claimant to the throne of the Kingdom of England. The epithet "Curthose" had its origins in the Norman French word courtheuse "short stockings" and was apparently derived from a nickname given to Robert by his father; the chroniclers William of Malmesbury and Orderic Vitalis reported that William the Conqueror had derisively called Robert brevis-ocrea ("short boot").

The eldest son of William the Conqueror, Robert's reign as duke is noted for the discord with his brothers William II and Henry I in England. Robert mortgaged his duchy to finance his participation in the First Crusade, where he was an important crusader commander. Eventually, his disagreements with Henry I led to his death in captivity and the absorption of Normandy as a possession of England.

Robert I, Duke of Normandy

Robert the Magnificent (French: le Magnifique; 22 June 1000 – 1–3 July 1035), was the Duke of Normandy from 1027 until his death in 1035.

Owing to uncertainty over the numbering of the Dukes of Normandy he is usually called Robert I, but sometimes Robert II with his ancestor Rollo as Robert I. He was the son of Richard II and brother of Richard III, who preceded him as the Duke. Less than a year after his father's death, Robert revolted against his brother's rule, but failed. He would later inherit Normandy after his brother's death. He was succeeded by his illegitimate son, William the Conqueror who became the first Norman king of England in 1066, following the Norman conquest of England.

Rollo

Rollo or Gaange Rolf (Norman: Rou; Old Norse: Hrólfr; French: Rollon; c. 860 – c. 930 AD) was a Viking who became the first ruler of Normandy, a region in northern France. He is sometimes called the first Duke of Normandy. His son and grandson, William Longsword and Richard I, used the titles "count" (Latin comes or consul) and "prince" (princeps). His great-grandson Richard II was the first to officially use the title of Duke of Normandy. His Scandinavian name Rolf was extended to Gaange Rolf because he became too heavy as an adult for a horse to carry; therefore he had to walk (ganga in older Dano-Norwegian). Rollo emerged as the outstanding personality among the Norsemen who had secured a permanent foothold on Frankish soil in the valley of the lower Seine. Charles the Simple, the king of West Francia, ceded them lands between the mouth of the Seine and what is now Rouen in exchange for Rollo agreeing to end his brigandage, and provide the Franks with protection against future Viking raids.Rollo is first recorded as the leader of these Viking settlers in a charter of 918, and he continued to reign over the region of Normandy until at least 928. He was succeeded by his son William Longsword in the Duchy of Normandy that he had founded. The offspring of Rollo and his followers became known as the Normans. After the Norman conquest of England and their conquest of southern Italy and Sicily over the following two centuries, their descendants came to rule Norman England (the House of Normandy), the Kingdom of Sicily (the Kings of Sicily) as well as the Principality of Antioch from the 10th to 12th century, leaving behind an enduring legacy in the histories of Europe and the Near East.

Rouen Cathedral

Rouen Cathedral (French: Cathédrale primatiale Notre-Dame de l'Assomption de Rouen) is a Roman Catholic church in Rouen, Normandy, France. It is the see of the Archbishop of Rouen, Primate of Normandy. The cathedral is in the Gothic architectural tradition.

Sybilla of Normandy

Sybilla of Normandy (1092 – 12 or 13 July 1122) was Queen consort of Scotland, wife to Alexander I.

Sybilla was the first child of Henry I of England and his mistress, Lady Sybilla Corbet of Alcester (b. 1077 in Alcester, Warwickshire, d. after 1157). Her maternal grandfather was Robert Corbet of Alcester, part of the Corbet family. She was born circa 1092 in Domfront, Normandy.

Around 1107, Sybilla married Alexander I, King of Scots. The marriage was childless. The marriage ceremony may have occurred as early as 1107, or as at late as 1114.William of Malmesbury's account attacks Sybilla, but the evidence argues that Alexander and Sybilla were a devoted but childless couple and Sybilla was of noteworthy piety. Sybilla died in unrecorded circumstances at Eilean nam Ban (Kenmore on Loch Tay) in July 1122 and was buried at Dunfermline Abbey. Alexander did not remarry and Walter Bower wrote that he planned an Augustinian Priory at the Eilean nam Ban dedicated to Sybilla's memory, and he may have taken steps to have her venerated. She was buried in Dunfermline Abbey, Fife.

William Adelin

William Ætheling (Old English: [ˈwiɫiɑm ˈæðeliŋg]; 5 August 1103 – 25 November 1120), commonly called Adelin, sometimes Adelinus, Adelingus, A(u)delin or other Latinised Norman-French variants of Ætheling, was the son of Henry I of England by his wife Matilda of Scotland, and was thus heir apparent to the English throne. His early death without issue caused a succession crisis, known in history as the Anarchy.

William Clito

William Clito (25 October 1102 – 28 July 1128) reigned as Count of Flanders and claimed the Duchy of Normandy. His surname "Clito" was a Latin term equivalent to the Anglo-Saxon "Aetheling" and its Latinized form "Adelinus" (used to refer to his first cousin, William Adelin). Both terms signified "man of royal blood" or, the modern equivalent, "prince".

William II of England

William II (Old Norman: Williame; c. 1056 – 2 August 1100), the third son of William the Conqueror, was King of England from 1087 until 1100, with powers over Normandy, and influence in Scotland. He was less successful in extending control into Wales. William is commonly known as William Rufus (Rufus being Latin for "the Red"), perhaps because of his ruddy appearance or, more likely, due to having red hair as a child that grew out in later life.William was a figure of complex temperament, capable of both bellicosity and flamboyance. He did not marry, nor did he father any offspring, which has led to speculations of possible homosexuality by historians. He died after being struck by an arrow while hunting, under circumstances that remain unclear. Circumstantial evidence in the behaviour of those around him raises strong, but unproven, suspicions of murder. His younger brother Henry I hurriedly succeeded him as king.

Barlow says he was "A rumbustious, devil-may-care soldier, without natural dignity or social graces, with no cultivated tastes and little show of conventional religious piety or morality—indeed, according to his critics, addicted to every kind of vice, particularly lust and especially sodomy." On the other hand, he was a wise ruler and victorious general. Barlow finds that, "His chivalrous virtues and achievements were all too obvious. He had maintained good order and satisfactory justice in England and restored good peace to Normandy. He had extended Anglo-Norman rule in Wales, brought Scotland firmly under his lordship, recovered Maine, and kept up the pressure on the Vexin."

William Longsword

William Longsword (French: Guillaume Longue-Épée, Latin: Willermus Longa Spata, Old Norse: Vilhjálmr Langaspjót; c. 893 – 17 December 942) was the second ruler of Normandy, from 927 until his assassination in 942.He is sometimes anachronistically dubbed "Duke of Normandy", even though the title duke (dux) did not come into common usage until the 11th century. Longsword was known at the time by the title Count (Latin comes) of Rouen.Flodoard—always detailed about titles—consistently referred to both Rollo and his son William as principes (chieftains) of the Norse.

Royal houses of Europe
History
Royal Houses
Military
Geography
Demographics
Culture
Architecture
Symbols

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.