House of Nassau-Weilburg

The House of Nassau-Weilburg, a branch of the House of Nassau, ruled a division of the County of Nassau, which was a state in what is now Germany, then part of the Holy Roman Empire, from 1344 to 1806.

On July 17, 1806, on the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire, the counties of Nassau-Usingen and Nassau-Weilburg both joined the Confederation of the Rhine. Under pressure from Napoleon, both counties merged to become the Duchy of Nassau on August 30, 1806, under the joint rule of Prince Frederick August of Nassau-Usingen and his younger cousin, Prince Frederick William of Nassau-Weilburg. As Frederick August had no heirs, he agreed that Frederick William should become the sole ruler after his death. However, Frederick William died from a fall on the stairs at Schloss Weilburg on January 9, 1816, and it was his son William who later became duke of a unified Nassau.

The sovereigns of this house afterwards governed the Duchy of Nassau until 1866. Since 1890, they have governed the nation of Luxembourg. The House of Nassau-Weilburg became extinct in the male line with the death of Grand Duchess Charlotte of Luxembourg in 1985.

The reigning house of Luxembourg retained the name of "Nassau-Weilburg" as its official name. Since the death of Grand Duchess Charlotte, the House of Nassau-Weilburg is a cadet branch (male-line descendants) of the House of Bourbon-Parma.[1]

House of Nassau-Weilburg
Blason Nassau-Weilbourg
Parent houseNassau (until 1985)
Bourbon-Parma (since 1985)
Founded1344
FounderJohn I of Nassau-Weilburg
Current headHenri, Grand Duke of Luxembourg (in cognatic line)
Titles
Style(s)His/Her Royal Highness
Estate(s)of Nassau and Luxembourg
Dissolution1985 (in agnatic line)

Religion

The first two Grand Dukes of Luxembourg, Adolphe and Guillaume IV, were Protestants. However, the religion of the house changed after Guillaume's marriage to Marie Anne of Portugal, who was Roman Catholic.

Gallery

Weilburg Schloss Gesamtansicht

Weilburg Castle

Residenz der Grossherzoeglichen Familie

Berg Castle, Luxembourg

Sovereigns from the House of Nassau-Weilburg

(Princely) County of Nassau-Weilburg

(Gefürstete) Grafschaft Nassau-Weilburg
1344–1806
Flag of Nassau-Weilburg
Flag
Coat of arms of Nassau-Weilburg
Coat of arms
Nassau-Weilburg as in 1789
Nassau-Weilburg as in 1789
StatusCounty
GovernmentCounty
Historical eraMiddle Ages
Early modern
• Established
1344
• Raised to princely county
1366
• Seized Electoral Trier
    (east of Rhine)
1803
• Merged w. N.-Usingen
    into Nassau
30 August 1806
Preceded by
Succeeded by
County of Nassau
Electorate of Trier
Duchy of Nassau

Nassau

Counts of Nassau-Weilburg

Princely counts of Nassau-Weilburg

Dukes of Nassau

Grand Dukes of Luxembourg

Family Tree

Compiled from Wikipedia and:[2][1]

 
 
For ancestors of the
House of Nassau-Weilburg
(House of Nassau family tree)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John III
(1441 +1480)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
Blason Philippe de Nassau-Sarrebrück (selon Gelre).svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Louis I
(1473 +1523)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
Philip III
(1504 +1559)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Albert
(1537 +1593)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
 
 
Philip IV
(1542 +1602)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
in Saarbrucken
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
Blason Philippe de Nassau-Sarrebrück (selon Gelre).svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Louis II
(1565 +1627)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
in Ottweiler
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
 
 
William
(1570–1597)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
in Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
 
 
John Casimir
(1577 +1602)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
in Gleiberg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William Louis
(1590 +1640)
Count of Nassau-Saarbrücken
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
Blason Nassau-Weilbourg-Saarbrucken.svg
 
 
 
John
(1603 +1677)
Count of Nassau-Idstein
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
Counts of Nassau-Idstein
ext.1721
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ernest Casimir
(1607 +1655)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John Louis
(1625 +1690)
Count of Nassau-Ottweiler
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
ext. 1728
 
 
Gustav Adolph
(1632 +1677)
Count of Nassau-Saarbrücken
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
ext. 1723
 
 
Walrad
(1635 +1702)
Count & Prince of Nassau-Usingen
Princely crown.svg
ext. 1816
 
 
 
 
Frederick
(1640 +1675)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John Ernst
(1664 +1719)
Count & Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown.svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles August
(1685 +1753)
Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown.svg
 
 
 
 
Charles Ernst
(1689–1709)
Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown.svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles Christian
(1735 +1788)
Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown.svg
 
Princess Carolina of Orange-Nassau
(1743 +1787)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Frederick William
(1768 +1816)
Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown.svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William
(1792 +1839)
Duke of Nassau
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic).svg
Blason Guillaume, duc de Nassau (1816-1839).svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adolphe
(1817 +1905)
Duke of Nassau 1839-1866
Grand Duke of Luxembourg
1890-1905
Crown of the Grand Duke of Luxembourg.svgCrown of the Grand Duke of Luxembourg.svg
CoA Grand Duke of Luxembourg 1890-1898.svgArms of the Grand Dukes of Luxembourg prior to 2000.svg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg

References

  1. ^ a b Hay, Mark Edward (1 June 2016). "The House of Nassau between France and Independence, 1795–1814: Lesser Powers, Strategies of Conflict Resolution, Dynastic Networks". The International History Review. 38 (3): 482–504. doi:10.1080/07075332.2015.1046387.
  2. ^ Louda, Jiri; Maclagan, Michael (December 12, 1988), "Netherlands and Luxembourg, Table 33", Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (1st (U.S.) ed.), Clarkson N. Potter, Inc.;
Royal house
House of Nassau-Weilburg
New dynasty
partitioned from Cty. of Nassau
Ruling house of Nassau-Weilburg
1344–1806
Nassau-Weilburg merged in
Ducal Nassau ruled by the
House of Nassau-Usingen
Preceded by
House of Nassau-Usingen
Ruling house of the Duchy of Nassau
1816–1866
Nassau annexed by Prussia
Preceded by
House of Orange-Nassau
Ruling house of Luxembourg
1890–present
Succeeded by
Incumbent

Cadet branch of
House of Bourbon-Parma
1964–present (last male dynast died in 1912)
Adolphe, Grand Duke of Luxembourg

Adolphe (Adolf Wilhelm August Karl Friedrich; 24 July 1817 – 17 November 1905) was the last sovereign Duke of Nassau, reigning from 20 August 1839 until the duchy's annexation to Kingdom of Prussia in 1866. In 1890, he became Grand Duke of Luxembourg following the death of King William III of the Netherlands, ending the personal union between the Netherlands and Luxembourg, until his own death in 1905. He was the first monarch of Luxembourg from the House of Nassau-Weilburg.

Adolphe became Duke of Nassau in August 1839, following the death of his father William. After Austria's defeat in Austro-Prussian War of 1866, Duchy of Nassau was annexed to Kingdom of Prussia and he lost his throne.

From 1815 to 1839, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg was ruled by the kings of the Netherlands as a province of the Netherlands. Following the Treaty of London (1839), Grand Duchy of Luxembourg became independent but remained in personal union with the Netherlands. Following the death of his sons, King William III of the Netherlands, had no male heirs to succeed him. In the Netherlands, females were allowed to succeed to the throne in 1887. Luxembourg, however, followed salic law which barred females from succession. Thus, upon King William III's death, the crown of the Netherlands passed to his only daughter, Wilhelmina, while that of Luxembourg passed to Adolphe in accordance with the Nassau Family Pact.

Adolphe died in 1905 and was succeeded as Grand Duke of Luxembourg by his son, William IV.

Burgravine Louise Isabelle of Kirchberg

Louise Isabelle Alexandrine Auguste, Countess of Sayn-Hachenburg, Burgravine of Kirchberg, full German name: Luise Isabelle Alexandrine Auguste, Gräfin zu Sayn-Hachenburg, Burggräfin von Kirchberg (19 April 1772, Hachenburg – 6 January 1827, Vienna, Austrian Empire) was the Princess consort of Nassau-Weilburg (28 November 1788 – 9 January 1816) through her marriage to Frederick William, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg.

Charles Christian, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg

Charles Christian, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg (Weilburg, 16 January 1735 – Münster-Dreissen, near Kirchheim, 28 November 1788), till 1753 Count of Nassau-Weilburg, was the first ruler of the Principality of Nassau-Weilburg between 1753 and 1788.

County of Nassau-Saarbrücken

The County of Saarbrücken was an Imperial State in the Upper Lorraine region, with its capital at Saarbrücken. From 1381 it belonged to the Walram branch of the Rhenish House of Nassau.

Frederick William, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg

Frederick William, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg (25 October 1768, The Hague – 9 January 1816, Weilburg) was a ruler of Nassau-Weilburg. In 1806 he was given the title of Prince of Nassau, while his cousin, Prince Frederick Augustus of Nassau-Usingen, became the Duke of Nassau. Frederick William died in January 1816, only two months before his cousin. Both men were succeeded by Frederick William's son, William.

Gerlach I, Count of Nassau

Gerlach I of Nassau (between 1275 and 1283 – 7 January 1361), Count of Nassau in Wiesbaden, Idstein, Weilburg, and Weilnau.

Grand Duchess Elizabeth Mikhailovna of Russia

Grand Duchess Elizabeth Mikhailovna of Russia (Moscow, 26 May 1826 – Wiesbaden, 28 January 1845) was the second child and daughter of Grand Duke Mikhail Pavlovich of Russia and Princess Charlotte of Württemberg who took the name Elena Pavlovna upon her conversion to the Orthodox faith. Through her father, Elizabeth was a granddaughter of Tsar Paul I of Russia, and a niece of both Russian emperors Alexander I and Nicholas I.

Imagina of Isenburg-Limburg

Imagina of Isenburg-Limburg (ca. 1255 – 29 September 1313?) was the Queen consort of Adolf of Nassau, King of Germany.

John I, Count of Nassau-Weilburg

John I of Nassau-Weilburg (1309–1371) was Count of Nassau-Weilburg from 1355 to 1371.

John I was the second son of Count Gerlach I of Nassau-Wiesbaden and Agnes of Hesse, granddaughter of Henry I, Landgrave of Hesse. On Gerlach I abdication in 1346, John and his brothers divided the family lands. John acquired Weilburg on the Lahn.

John was adopted by Emperor Charles IV in 1366 and elevated to Imperial Count. He died on September 20, 1371.

Louis II, Count of Nassau-Weilburg

Louis II of Nassau-Weilburg (9 August 1565, Weilburg – 8 November 1627, Saarbrücken) was a count of Nassau-Weilburg.

Nassau-Usingen

Nassau-Usingen was a county of the Holy Roman Empire in the Upper Rhenish Circle that became a principality in 1688.

The origin of the county lies in the medieval county of Weilnau that was acquired by the counts of Nassau-Weilburg in 1602.

That county was divided in 1629 into the lines of Nassau-Weilburg, Nassau-Idstein and Nassau-Saarbrücken that was divided only 30 years later in 1659.

The emerging counties were Nassau-Saarbrücken, Nassau-Ottweiler and Nassau-Usingen. At the beginning of the 18th century, 3 of the Nassau lines died out and Nassau-Usingen became their successor (1721 Nassau-Idstein, 1723 Nassau-Ottweiler und 1728 Nassau-Saarbrücken).

In 1735 Nassau-Usingen was divided again into Nassau-Usingen and Nassau-Saarbrücken. In 1797 Nassau-Usingen inherited Nassau-Saarbrücken.

On July 17, 1806, the counties of Nassau-Usingen and Nassau-Weilburg joined the Confederation of the Rhine. Under pressure from Napoleon both counties merged to become the Duchy of Nassau on August 30, 1806, under joint rule of Prince Frederick August of Nassau-Usingen and his younger cousin Prince Frederick William of Nassau-Weilburg. As Frederick August had no heirs, he agreed that Frederick William should become sole ruler after his death. However, Frederick William died from a fall on the stairs at Schloss Weilburg on 9 January 1816, and it was his son William who became duke of a unified Nassau.

The title has been carried in pretense by Prince Frederick August's half-brother Karl Philip's line.

Princess Adelheid-Marie of Anhalt-Dessau

Princess Adelheid-Marie of Anhalt-Dessau (German: Adelheid-Marie; French: Adélaïde-Marie) (25 December 1833 – 24 November 1916) was a Princess of Anhalt-Dessau and member of the House of Ascania. As the wife of Adolphe of Nassau, she was Duchess of Nassau from 1851 until 1866 and Grand Duchess of Luxembourg from 1890 until 1905.

Princess Carolina of Orange-Nassau

Princess Carolina of Orange-Nassau (Wilhelmine Carolina; 28 February 1743 – 6 May 1787) was a Dutch regent. She was the daughter of William IV, Prince of Orange, Stadtholder of the Netherlands, and Anne, Princess Royal. She was regent of the Netherlands from 1765 until 1766 during the minority of her brother.

Princess Caroline of Nassau-Usingen

Princess Caroline of Nassau-Usingen (German: Prinzessin Karoline Polyxena von Nassau-Usingen; 4 April 1762 – 17 August 1823) was the elder daughter of Karl Wilhelm, Prince of Nassau-Usingen, and wife of Landgrave Frederick of Hesse-Kassel.

Princess Elisabeth of Luxembourg (1901–1950)

Princess Elisabeth of Luxembourg (Elisabeth Marie Wilhelmine; 7 March 1901 – 2 August 1950) was the daughter of William IV, Grand Duke of Luxembourg, and his wife, Infanta Marie Anne of Portugal.

In 1922, she married Prince Ludwig Philipp of Thurn and Taxis.

Princess Helena of Nassau

Princess Helena of Nassau (German: Prinzessin Helene Wilhelmine Henriette Pauline Marianne von Nassau-Weilburg; 18 August 1831 – 27 October 1888) was a daughter of William, Duke of Nassau, and consort of George Victor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont.

Princess Henriette of Nassau-Weilburg

Princess Henriëtte of Nassau-Weilburg, then of Nassau (22 April 1780, in Kirchheimbolanden – 2 January 1857, in Kirchheim unter Teck) was a daughter of Prince Charles Christian and Carolina of Orange-Nassau, daughter of William IV, Prince of Orange.

She is an ancestor of branches of the Austrian Imperial and Royal Family and Russian Imperial Family and Dutch Royal Family; the German Royal, Grand Ducal, Ducal, Princely and Princely noble families of: Baden, Bavaria, Hanover, Hohenlohe-Langenburg, Oldenburg, Salm-Salm, Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, Waldeck and Pyrmont and Wied; in addition to the British, Greek, Romanian, Spanish and Yugoslavian Royal Families.

Princess Therese of Nassau-Weilburg

Princess Therese Wilhelmine Friederike Isabelle Charlotte of Nassau-Weilburg, (German: Therese Wilhelmine Friedrike Charlotte Prinzessin von Nassau-Weilburg; Russian: Терезия Васильевна Нассауская, Terezya Vasilyevna Nassauskaya; 17 April 1815 in Weilburg, Duchy of Nassau – 8 December 1871 in Prague, Kingdom of Bohemia, Austria–Hungary) was a member of the House of Nassau-Weilburg and a Princess of Nassau-Weilburg by birth. Through her marriage to Duke Peter of Oldenburg, Therese was also a Duchess of Oldenburg.

William IV, Grand Duke of Luxembourg

William IV (William Alexander; French: Guillaume Alexandre; 22 April 1852 – 25 February 1912) reigned as the Grand Duke of Luxembourg from 17 November 1905 until his death. He succeeded his father, Adolphe.

William was a Protestant, the religion of the House of Nassau. He married Princess Marie Anne of Portugal, believing that a Roman Catholic country ought to have a Roman Catholic monarch. Thus his heirs have been Catholic.

At the death of his uncle, Prince Nikolaus-Wilhelm in 1905, the only other legitimate male in the House of Nassau-Weilburg was William's cousin, Georg Nikolaus, Count of Merenberg, the product of a morganatic marriage. So in 1907, William declared the Counts of Merenberg non-dynastic, naming his own eldest daughter Marie-Adélaïde (1894–1924) as heir presumptive to the grand ducal throne. She became Luxembourg's first reigning grand duchess upon her father's death in 1912, and upon her own abdication in 1919, was succeeded by her younger sister Charlotte (1896–1985). Charlotte's descendants reign until the present day.

He was the last monarch of Luxembourg to die whilst still on the throne.

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