Hot Pants Patrol

The Hot Pants Patrol was a group used by the Philadelphia Phillies baseball team in the 1970s,[1] designed to attract greater attendance, particularly by men, to home games at Veterans Stadium. It consisted of a number of attractive young "fillies" or "usherettes" who were assigned to various sections throughout the stadium.[2] Their uniform consisted of red jumpsuit incorporating hot pants (hence the name) emblazoned with the Phillies logo and white trim, albeit slightly longer pants than what normally was worn along with white go-go boots.

The Hot Pant Patrol debuted on April 10, 1971, the opening game at Veterans Stadium. There were 140 Fillies at the first game who were recruited from 432 applicants and advised by letter to wear "your shortest skirt and tightest blouse" to interviews. The 35 Fillies designated best looking were called, collectively, the Hot Pants Patrol and wore red hot pants.[3]

The Fillies last season was 1982 by which time the Phillie Phanatic mascot had established itself as the center of Veterans Stadium in-game entertainment.

Member of the Hot Pants Patrol
Pictured is a member of the Philadelphia Phillies Hot Pants Patrol

References

  1. ^ "memories of the '70s – Hot pants". W POPAGANDA. Waheeda Harris. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  2. ^ Missanelli, M. G. (30 June 1989). "At The Vet, Not Everyone Has A Ball Off-field Jobs Can Be Desirable Or Dirty". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia Media Network, PBC. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  3. ^ "Curtain Up On a Mod New Act". Sports Illustrated. Time Inc. April 17, 1971. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
Hot Pants

Hot Pants can refer to:

Hotpants or hot pants, an item of clothing

"Hot Pants" (James Brown song)

"Hot Pants" (Gene Summers song)

Hot Pants Patrol, a promotional group for the Philadelphia Phillies

Hot Pants (band), a French band formed by singer Manu Chao prior to the establishment of Mano Negra

Hot Pants (album)

Hotpants

Hotpants, hot pants, or booty shorts describe extremely short shorts, which may be worn by women or to a lesser extent, by men. The term was first used by Women's Wear Daily in 1970 to describe shorts made in luxury fabrics such as velvet and satin for fashionable wear, rather than their more practical equivalents that had been worn for sports or leisure since the 1930s. The term has since become a generic term for any pair of extremely short shorts. While hotpants were briefly a very popular element of mainstream fashion in the early 1970s, by the mid-1970s, they had become associated with the sex industry, which contributed to their fall from fashion. However, hotpants continue to be popular as clubwear well into the 2010s and are often worn within the entertainment industry, particularly as part of cheerleader costumes or for dancers (especially backup dancers). Performers such as Britney Spears and Kylie Minogue have famously worn hotpants as part of their public performances and presentation.

Philadelphia Phillies

The Philadelphia Phillies are a professional baseball team based in Philadelphia, USA. The Phillies compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member of the National League (NL) East division. Since 2004, the team's home has been Citizens Bank Park, located in South Philadelphia.

The Phillies have won two World Series championships (against the Kansas City Royals in 1980 and the Tampa Bay Rays in 2008) and seven National League pennants, the first of which came in 1915. Since the first modern World Series was played in 1903, the Phillies played 77 consecutive seasons (and 97 seasons from the club's establishment) before they won their first World Series—longer than any other of the 16 teams that made up the major leagues for the first half of the 20th century. They are one of the more successful franchises since the start of the Divisional Era in Major League Baseball. The Phillies have won their division 11 times, which ranks 6th among all teams and 4th in the National League, including five consecutive division titles from 2007 to 2011.

The franchise was founded in Philadelphia in 1883, replacing the team from Worcester, Massachusetts in the National League. The team has played at several stadiums in the city, beginning with Recreation Park and continuing at Baker Bowl; Shibe Park, which was later renamed Connie Mack Stadium in honor of the longtime Philadelphia Athletics manager; Veterans Stadium, and now Citizens Bank Park. The Phillies have had a long-running rivalry with the New York Mets.

The team's spring training facilities are located in Clearwater, Florida, where its Class-A minor league affiliate Clearwater Threshers plays at Spectrum Field. Its Double-A affiliate is the Reading Fightin Phils, which plays in Reading, Pennsylvania. The Triple-A affiliate is the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, which plays in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Its Low Class-A affiliate the Lakewood BlueClaws play in Lakewood, New Jersey.

Whiz Kids (baseball)

The Whiz Kids is the nickname of the 1950 Philadelphia Phillies of Major League Baseball. The team was largely made up of rookies; The average age of a member of the Whiz Kids was 26.4 The team won the 1950 National League pennant but failed to win the World Series.

After owner R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr. built a team of bonus babies, the 1950 team won for the majority of the season, but slumped late, allowing the defending National League champion Brooklyn Dodgers to gain ground in the last two weeks. The final series of the season was against Brooklyn, and the final game pitted the Opening Day starting pitchers, right-handers Robin Roberts and Don Newcombe, against one another. The Phillies defeated the Dodgers in extra innings in the final game of the season on a three-run home run by Dick Sisler in the top of the tenth inning. In the World Series which followed, the Whiz Kids were swept by the New York Yankees, who won their second of five consecutive World Series championships.The failure of the Whiz Kids to win another pennant after their lone successful season has been attributed to multiple theories, the most prominent of which is Carpenter's unwillingness to integrate his team after winning a pennant with an all-white team.

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