Hooks Wiltse

George Leroy "Hooks" Wiltse (September 7, 1879 – January 21, 1959) was a professional baseball pitcher. He played twelve seasons in Major League Baseball from 1904 to 1915. He was the brother of pitcher Snake Wiltse.

"Hooks" earned his nickname because of his exceptional curveball and was one of the earliest pitchers to have a curveball that was regarded as more effective than his fastball. From 1904 to 1914, he pitched for the National League's New York Giants. During that time, he combined with teammate Christy Mathewson for 435 wins, making them one of the best lefty-righty duos in history. Wiltse won five pennants with the Giants and pitched 3.1 innings in the 1911 World Series.

On July 4, 1908, Wiltse pitched a perfect game through 26 batters until he hit Philadelphia Phillies pitcher George McQuillan on a 2–2 count in a scoreless game. This was the only occurrence of a pitcher losing a perfect game with two outs in the ninth inning by hitting a batter until Washington Nationals pitcher Max Scherzer did so on June 20, 2015. Like Wiltse, Scherzer eventually completed a no-hitter, but unlike Wiltse, Scherzer had a 6-0 lead and was able to retire the next batter to end the game. Umpire Cy Rigler later admitted that he should have called the previous pitch strike three, which would have ended the inning. Wiltse pitched on, winning 1–0 in ten innings, with the hit-batsman the only lapse separating him from a perfect game. Wiltse's ten-inning complete game no-hitter still remains a Major League record.[1]

As a pitcher, Wiltse was an above average hitter and fielder and was occasionally used as a position player to include playing first base in game two of the 1913 World Series where he cut down two runners at home plate in the ninth inning.[1]

In 1915, he jumped to the Brooklyn Tip-Tops of the Federal League, which is where he ended his major league career. He continued to play minor league baseball on and off until 1926. His last appearance came with the Reading Keystones, where he played in five games at the age of 46.[1]

Following his retirement from baseball, Hooks returned to his hometown of Syracuse, New York where he worked in real estate and became involved in local politics, serving as a local alderman and property assessor.[1]

Wiltse died of emphysema on January 21, 1959 at age 79.[1]

”I missed being the only pitcher of all time to pitch a perfect ten inning game because Cy Rigler miscalled a strike. He admitted afterward he could have called it one. It was a tough break for the next pitch struck McQuillan on the shoulder and put him on first base. It has been a perfect game for eight and two-thirds innings.[1]

Hooks Wiltse
Hooks Wiltse
Pitcher
Born: September 7, 1879
Hamilton, New York
Died: January 21, 1959 (aged 79)
Long Beach, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 21, 1904, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
September 25, 1915, for the Brooklyn Tip-Tops
MLB statistics
Win–loss record139-90
Earned run average2.47
Strikeouts965
Teams
Career highlights and awards

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Cox, Joe (2017) Almost Perfect: The Heartbreaking Pursuit of Pitching’s Holy Grail, Lyons Press, Guilford, Connecticut, pages 1-14[1]

See also

Sources

  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
  • SABR biography
  • The Editors of Total Baseball (2000). Baseball:The Biographical Encyclopedia. Sports Illustrated. p. 343. ISBN 1-892129-34-5.
Preceded by
Cy Young
No-hitter pitcher
July 4, 1908
Succeeded by
Nap Rucker
1904 New York Giants season

The 1904 New York Giants season was the 22nd season in franchise history. They led the National League in both runs scored and fewest runs allowed, on their way to 106 wins and the pennant.

The first modern World Series had been played the previous year, but manager John McGraw and owner John T. Brush refused to play the American League champion Boston Americans in a 1904 World Series. They would change their position the following year.

1905 New York Giants season

The 1905 New York Giants season was the franchise's 23rd season, and the team won their second consecutive National League pennant. They beat the Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series.

1906 New York Giants season

The 1906 New York Giants season was the franchise's 24th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 96-56 record, 20 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1907 New York Giants season

The 1907 New York Giants season was the franchise's 25th season. The team finished in fourth place in the National League with an 82-71 record, 25½ games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1908 Major League Baseball season

The 1908 Major League Baseball season. The Chicago Cubs defeated the Detroit Tigers 4–1 to win the World Series.

1908 New York Giants season

The 1908 New York Giants season was the franchise's 26th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 98–56 record, one game behind the Chicago Cubs.

Paced by Turkey Mike Donlin, the offense scored the most runs in the league. Donlin led the team in nearly all batting categories and was second in batting to Honus Wagner.

Future Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson earned the pitching triple crown with 37 wins, 259 strikeouts, and a 1.43 ERA. However, he lost the last game of the season to Three Finger Brown of the Chicago Cubs, and the Giants finished one game back in the pennant race.

That one-game playoff became necessary after Giants rookie Fred Merkle failed to touch second base at the end of a previous contest, costing them a win. In addition, they were beaten by another rookie, Phillies pitcher Harry Coveleski, three times in five days late in the season. Coveleski was subsequently nicknamed "The Giant Killer".

1909 New York Giants season

The 1909 New York Giants season was the franchise's 27th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with a 92–61 record, 18½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1910 New York Giants season

The 1910 New York Giants season was the franchise's 28th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 91-63 record, 13 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

The Giants offense scored the most runs in the NL. Fred Snodgrass had his breakthrough season, finishing fourth in the batting race and also leading the team in on-base percentage and OPS.

Their pitching staff was once again led by Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson, who won a league-best 27 games. His 1.89 earned run average ranked third.

1911 New York Giants season

The 1911 New York Giants season was the franchise's 29th season. It involved the Giants winning their first of three consecutive National League pennants. They were beaten by the Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series.

Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants won the NL by 7½ games. On the offensive side, they finished second in total runs scored. On the defensive side, they allowed the fewest. Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson led the league in ERA, and Rube Marquard had the most strikeouts.

Taken together with the 1912 and 1913 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time.

1912 New York Giants season

The 1912 New York Giants season was the franchise's 30th season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant. They were beaten by the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. Fred Snodgrass took most of the blame, as he dropped a fly ball in the deciding contest.Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants dominated the NL, opening the season 54-11 and building a 16 1/2-game lead by July 3. On the offensive side, they easily led the league in runs scored. Larry Doyle finished fourth in the batting race and was voted league MVP. Chief Meyers had one of the greatest offensive seasons ever for a catcher and was second in batting.They had arguably the best pitching staff, too. Jeff Tesreau, Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson, and Red Ames finished 1–2–5 in league ERA. Rube Marquard's 18-game winning streak was the top story in baseball.

Taken together with the 1911 and 1913 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time. It also makes up a good portion of the 1966 book The Glory of Their Times, as Marquard, Meyers, and Snodgrass were three of the players interviewed.

1913 New York Giants season

The 1913 New York Giants season was the franchise's 31st season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant for the third consecutive year. Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants dominated the NL and finished 12½ games in front of the second place Philadelphia Phillies. They were beaten by the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1913 World Series.

Ace pitcher Christy Mathewson went 25–11 and led the NL with a 2.06 ERA. Rube Marquard and Jeff Tesreau also won over 20 games, and the Giants easily allowed the fewest runs of any team in the league.

Taken together with the 1911 and 1912 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time. The roster was basically unchanged from 1912.

1914 New York Giants season

The 1914 New York Giants season was the franchise's 32nd season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 84-70 record, 10½ games behind the "Miracle Braves." They had finished first the three previous years.

This team featured two Hall of Fame pitchers: Christy Mathewson, one of the greatest ever, and Rube Marquard, whose selection is considered by some to be unfortunate.

Brooklyn Tip-Tops all-time roster

The following is a list of players and who appeared in at least one game for the Brooklyn Tip-Tops franchise of the Federal League from 1914 through 1915.

Hooks (nickname)

As a nickname, Hooks may refer to:

Hooks Cotter (1900–1955), American Major League Baseball infielder

Ray Dandridge (1913–1994), American Negro league infielder

Hooks Dauss (1889–1963), American Major League Baseball pitcher

Hooks Foreman (1895–1940), American Negro league catcher

Hooks Iott (1919–1980), American Major League Baseball pitcher

Hooks Warner (1894–1947), American Major League Baseball infielder

Hooks Wiltse (1879–1959), American Major League Baseball pitcher

International League Hall of Fame

The International League Hall of Fame is an American baseball hall of fame which honors players, managers, and executives of the International League (IL). It was created by the International League Baseball Writers' Association in 1947 to honor those individuals who made significant contributions to the league. The Hall of Fame inducted its first class of nine former players, managers, and league officials in 1947. A plaque was unveiled at the IL's New York City offices located in the Ruppert Building at 535 Fifth Avenue. Today, the plaque has no permanent home, but exists as a traveling display which visits a number of the league's ballparks each season.From 1949 through 1960, the league inducted up to three new members each year. Only one member was inducted annually from 1961 to 1963. After the cessation of the league's Baseball Writers' Association, the Hall of Fame became dormant from 1964 to 2006. The Hall was reestablished in 2007 to commemorate the League's 125th season of play in 2008. Two new members were inducted in 2007, and plans were made to elect up to 28, 14, and 7 inductees, respectively, over the next three years. Since 2011, up to three inductees have been voted into the Hall annually. As of 2019, 126 individuals have been inducted into the International League Hall of Fame.

List of Major League Baseball career ERA leaders

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and are not used to determine ERA.

This is a list of the top 100 players in career earned run average, who have thrown at least 1,000 innings.

Ed Walsh holds the MLB earned run average record with a 1.816. Addie Joss (1.887) and Jim Devlin (1.896) are the only other pitchers with a career earned run average under 2.000.

List of San Francisco Giants no-hitters

The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball franchise based in San Francisco, California. They play in the National League West division. Also known in their early years as the "New York Gothams" (1883–84) and "New York Giants" (1885–1957), pitchers for the Giants have thrown 17 no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings", although one or more batters "may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference." No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. A no-hitter is rare enough that one team in Major League Baseball has still never had a pitcher accomplish the feat, and teams may go decades without recording one. A perfect game, a special subcategory of no-hitter, was finally thrown by Matt Cain on June 13, 2012. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game." Previously, this feat came closest on July 4, 1908 when Hooks Wiltse was hit by a pitch with two outs in the ninth and a scoreless tie. The plate umpire, Cy Rigler, claimed he should have called the previous pitch strike three, that would have ended the inning with a perfection. Wiltse would go on to retire all three in the tenth to end the game after the Giants scored a run in the top of the tenth.

Amos Rusie threw the first no-hitter in Giants history on July 31, 1891; the most recent no-hitter was thrown by Chris Heston on June 9, 2015. Five left-handed pitchers have thrown no-hitters in franchise history. The other ten pitchers were right-handers, including the most recent no-hitter author, Heston. Tim Lincecum and Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson are the only pitchers to throw more than one no-hitter in a Giants uniform. Ten no-hitters were thrown at home and seven on the road. The Giants threw one in April, two in May, five in June, five in July, one in August, and three in September. The longest interval between no-hitters was between the games pitched by Hubbell and Juan Marichal, encompassing 34 years, 1 month, and 7 days from May 8, 1929 till June 15, 1963. Conversely, the shortest interval between no-hitters was between the two games pitched by Lincecum, a period of 347 days. The Giants have no-hit the Philadelphia Phillies and San Diego Padres the most, doing so three times each—Wiltse in 1908; Jeff Tesreau in 1912; Jesse Barnes in 1922; Jonathan Sánchez in 2009; and Tim Lincecum in 2013 and 2014. Every Giants no-hitter has been a shutout (which is likely, but not a given, considering baserunners can reach, advance, and score by methods other than hits). The most baserunners allowed in a no-hitter was five, which occurred in Lincecum's first no-hitter. Of the 17 no-hitters, four have been won by a score of 1–0, more common than any other result. Those 1–0 no-hitters were attained by Christy Mathewson in 1905, Wiltse in 1908, Juan Marichal in 1963, and Gaylord Perry in 1968. The largest margin of victory in a Giants no-hitter was an 11–0 win by Carl Hubbell in 1929. Matt Cain is tied with Sandy Koufax for the most strikeouts in a perfect no-hitter with 14.The umpire is also an integral part of any no-hitter. The task of the umpire in a baseball game is to make any decision "which involves judgment, such as, but not limited to, whether a batted ball is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a ball, or whether a runner is safe or out… [the umpire's judgment on such matters] is final." Part of the duties of the umpire making calls at home plate includes defining the strike zone, which "is defined as that area over homeplate (sic) the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap." These calls define every baseball game and are therefore integral to the completion of any no-hitter. 16 different umpires presided over each of the franchise's 17 no-hitters.

The manager is another integral part of any no-hitter. The tasks of the manager include determining the starting rotation, the batting order and defensive lineup in every game, and how long a pitcher stays in the game. There have been eight different managers in the franchise's 17 no-hitters.

Snake Wiltse

Lewis DeWitt "Snake" Wiltse (December 5, 1871 – August 25, 1928) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, and New York Highlanders from 1901 to 1903. His brother was fellow major league pitcher George "Hooks" Wiltse.

Wiltse

Wiltse may refer to:

David Wiltse (b. ? ), American playwright

Hal Wiltse (1903-1983), American professional baseball player

Hooks Wiltse (George Leroy Wiltse) (1879-1959), American professional baseball player

Mark Wiltse (b. 1988), American soccer (football) player

Snake Wiltse (Lewis DeWitt Wiltse) (1871-1928), American professional baseball player

Dottie Wiltse Collins (Dorothy Wiltse Collins) (1923-2008), American professional baseball player

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