Hoby Brenner

Hoby F. J. Brenner (born June 2, 1959) is a former American football tight end who played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the New Orleans Saints.

Hoby Brenner
No. 85
Position:Tight end
Personal information
Born:June 2, 1959 (age 60)
Lynwood, California
Height:6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Weight:244 lb (111 kg)
Career information
High school:Fullerton Union
(Fullerton, California)
College:USC
NFL Draft:1981 / Round: 3 / Pick: 71
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:267
Receiving yards:3,849
Receiving TDs:21
Player stats at NFL.com

High school career

Brenner prepped at Fullerton Union High School. His teammate at Fullerton Union High was future NFL player Keith Van Horne of the Chicago Bears.

College career

Brenner played college football at the University of Southern California (USC) was a selection on the 1980 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team.

Professional career

Brenner played for the New Orleans Saints between 1981 and 1993. He was a Pro Bowl selection in 1987.

1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1979 Rose Bowl

The 1979 Rose Bowl was a college football bowl game played in Pasadena, California, on January 1, 1979. It was the 65th Rose Bowl Game. The USC Trojans, champions of the Pacific-10 Conference, defeated the Michigan Wolverines, (co) champions of the Big Ten Conference, 17–10. USC running back Charles White and Michigan quarterback Rick Leach were named the Players of the Game.

1979 USC Trojans football team

The 1979 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach John Robinson, the Trojans compiled an 11–0–1 record (6–0–1 against conference opponents), won the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 389 to 171. The team was ranked #2 in both the final AP Poll and the final UPI Coaches Poll.

Quarterback Paul McDonald led the team in passing, completing 164 of 264 passes for 2,223 yards with 18 touchdowns and six interceptions. Charles White led the team in rushing with 332 carries for 2,050 yards and 19 touchdowns. Dan Garcia led the team in receiving with 29 catches for 492 yards and three touchdowns.The team was named national champion by the College Football Researchers Association, an NCAA-designated major selector.

1980 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1980 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1980 USC Trojans football team

The 1980 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fifth year under head coach John Robinson, the Trojans compiled an 8–2–1 record (4–2–1 against conference opponents), finished in third place in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 265 to 134.Quarterback Gordon Adams led the team in passing, completing 104 of 179 passes for 1,237 yards with seven touchdowns and seven interceptions. Marcus Allen led the team in rushing with 354 carries for 1,563 yards and 14 touchdowns. Hoby Brenner led the team in receiving with 26 catches for 315 yards and no touchdowns.

1981 New Orleans Saints season

The 1981 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints' 15th season. Hoping past success would bring a bright future to New Orleans the Saints hired Bum Phillips to be their new head coach. With the first pick overall the Saints draft Heisman Trophy winner George Rogers out of South Carolina. Phillips banked on Rogers giving the Saints the same boost that Earl Campbell did when Phillips drafted him out of Texas three years earlier.

Rogers won the Offensive Rookie of the Year, as he rushed all-time rookie record of 1,674 yards, a record which was eclipsed just two years later when Eric Dickerson of the Los Angeles Rams rushed for 1,808. However, the Saints would continue to struggle finishing with a 4-12 record. It was New Orleans' 13th season with five or fewer wins, and its eighth with double-digit defeats.

Despite the team finishing with a bad record, they did have two special moments. The first was in week eight, when they upset the Cincinnati Bengals, who would go to the Super Bowl after winning the AFC championship. The second came four weeks later when Phillips returned to Houston, where his new team defeated his old one 27-24.

1982 New Orleans Saints season

The 1982 New Orleans Saints season saw the team nearly qualify for the NFL playoffs, missing it by a tiebreaker. It finished with a 4–5 record, and narrowly missed the playoffs in a complicated labyrinth of tie-breakers.

1983 New Orleans Saints season

The 1983 New Orleans Saints season was the team’s 17th as a member of the National Football League. They improved on their previous season’s output of 4–5, winning eight games. Despite the improvement, the team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the seventeenth consecutive season.

With an 8–7 record going into the final game of the season at the Superdome against the Los Angeles Rams, the Saints, with a win, would have finished with their first winning season and their first playoff berth. However, Rams kicker Mike Lansford kicked a 42-yard field goal with :06 left to defeat the Saints 26-24, and advance to the playoffs. Other than that field goal, the Rams did not score a single point on offense, instead scoring via a punt return for a touchdown, two interception returns for touchdowns, and a safety.

Two weeks earlier the Saints lost to the New England Patriots in shocking conditions with sleet and snow – with the only score being set up by Patriot Ricky Smith returning the initial kickoff to the 3-yard line. As of 2017, this game remains the most recent 7–0 result in NFL history, with only two games since seeing just one score, both a single field goal.Another damaging loss came on Monday Night Football in week 12, when the New York Jets rallied from a 14-point deficit by scoring 17 unanswered points in the fourth quarter, capped off by a 76-yard punt return touchdown by Kirk Springs, to stun the Saints 31-28. The Saints had a chance to force overtime in the closing seconds, but Morten Andersen missed badly to the left on a 51-yard field goal attempt.

1986 New Orleans Saints season

The 1986 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 20th as a member of the National Football League. They bested their previous season's output of 5–11, winning seven games.

1987 New Orleans Saints season

The 1987 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 21st year in the National Football League (NFL). The strike-shortened year was the Saints' first-ever winning season. The Saints also qualified for the postseason for the first time, riding largely on a nine-game winning streak to close the season. However, they were soundly defeated at home by the Minnesota Vikings in the Wild Card round of the playoffs, by a score of 44–10. The Vikings entered the playoffs with an 8–7 record and needed the Dallas Cowboys to defeat the St. Louis Cardinals on the final day of the season to qualify. The Saints' first winning season would be followed by another six consecutive non-losing seasons. Before the 1987 season, the Saints' non-losing seasons had consisted of only two 8–8 seasons, in 1979 and 1983. Head coach Jim Mora was named NFL Coach of the Year.

1988 Pro Bowl

The 1988 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 38th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1987 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 7, 1988, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,113. The final score was AFC 15, NFC 6.Marty Schottenheimer of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Minnesota Vikings head coach Jerry Burns. The referee was Dick Hantak.Bruce Smith of the Buffalo Bills was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning AFC team received $10,000 apiece while the NFC participants each took home $5,000.

1989 New Orleans Saints season

The 1989 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 23rd season in the National Football League, and the 14th with home games at the Superdome. They failed to improve their 10-6 record from 1988 and instead finishing at 9-7, missing the playoffs for the second straight year.

1989 Pro Bowl

The 1989 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 39th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1988 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1989, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,113. The final score was NFC 34, AFC 3.Marv Levy of the Buffalo Bills led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Chicago Bears head coach Mike Ditka. The referee was Ben Dreith.Randall Cunningham of the Philadelphia Eagles was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.It was the last Pro Bowl game played in January for two decades, until the 2010 Pro Bowl.

1993 New Orleans Saints season

The 1993 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 27th as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to match their previous season's output of 12–4, winning only eight games, despite starting the season 5–0. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the first time in four years.

Quarterback Bobby Hebert, who was the Saints' starter from late 1985 through 1992, save for a season-long holdout in 1990, signed as a free agent with the division rival Atlanta Falcons. Wade Wilson, who had fallen out of favor with the Minnesota Vikings after the hiring of coach Dennis Green in 1992, was signed as Hebert's replacement.During a loss to the New York Giants on Monday Night Football, fans in the Louisiana Superdome let out a sarcastic cheer when Wilson was injured. The incident enraged coach Jim Mora, who let loose with a tirade during his post-game press conference.

Brenner (surname)

Brenner is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Adam Brenner, better known under his stage name Adam Bomb (born 1963), American musician

Al Brenner (born 1947), American football player

Art Brenner (born 1924), American artist

Athalya Brenner (born 1943), Dutch-Israeli biblical scholar

Barbara Brenner (1951–2013), American activist

Benjamin Brenner (1903–1970), New York politician and judge

Bert Brenner (1887–1971), American baseball player

Bror Brenner (1885–1923), Finnish sailor

Charles Brenner, American biologist

Charles Brenner, APL implementor and forensic mathematics

Charles Brenner (psychiatrist) (1913–2008), American psychoanalyst

Claudia Brenner (born 1956), American activist

David Brenner (1936–2014), American comedian

David S. Brenner, American film editor

Eduard Brenner (1888–1970), German politician and anglicist

Engelbert Brenner (1904–1986), Austrian-American musician

Ernst Brenner (1856–1911), Swiss politician

George Brenner, American cartoonist

Guillaume Brenner (born 1986), French-born Togolese footballer

Helmut Brenner (born 1957), Austrian ethnomusicologist

Hoby Brenner (born 1959), American football player

John Brenner (disambiguation), several people

Johnny Brenner (born 1971), Irish hurler

Joshua Ilika Brenner (born 1976), Mexican swimmer

József Brenner, better known under his pen name Géza Csáth (1887–1919), Hungarian writer

Kehoma Brenner (born 1986), German rugby union player

Lenni Brenner (born 1937), American activist

Lisa Brenner (born 1974), American actress

Ludwig von Brenner (1833–1902), German composer

Malcolm Brenner, British scientist

Marie Brenner, American writer

Mark Brenner, American journalist

Paolo Brenner (born 1966), German cardiac surgeon

Reeve Robert Brenner (born 1936), American rabbi

Reuven Brenner, Canadian resident economist

Robert Brenner, American historian

Sophia Elisabet Brenner (1659–1730), Swedish writer

Sydney Brenner, (1927–2019), South African biologist

Veronica Brenner (born 1974), Canadian skier

Victor David Brenner (1871–1924), American sculptor and designer of the Lincoln Wheat Ears Cent

Vytas Brenner (1946–2004), Venezuelan musician

Yosef Haim Brenner (1881–1921), Ukrainian-born Hebrew-language author

Walter Brenner (disambiguation), several people

Zev Brenner, American talk radio host

Zvi Brenner, Israeli military leaderFictional characters:

Zeke Brenner, character from Doonesbury

Dr. Martin Brenner, character from Stranger Things

Joseph P. Brenner, character from Raw Deal

Fullerton Union High School

Fullerton Union High School is a public high school located in the Orange County, California city of Fullerton, United States operated by the Fullerton Joint Union High School District.

Keith Van Horne

Keith Van Horne (born November 6, 1957) is a former American college and professional football player who was an offensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for 13 seasons during the 1980s and 1990s. He played college football for the University of Southern California and earned All-American honors. Van Horne was selected in the first round of the 1981 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the NFL's Chicago Bears.

New Orleans Saints

The New Orleans Saints are a professional American football team based in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Saints currently compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) South division. The team was founded by John W. Mecom Jr., David Dixon, and the city of New Orleans on November 1, 1966. The Saints began play in Tulane Stadium in 1967.

The name "Saints" is an allusion to November 1 being All Saints Day in the Catholic faith. New Orleans has a large Catholic population, and the spiritual "When the Saints Go Marching In" is strongly associated with New Orleans and is often sung by fans at games. The franchise was founded on November 1, 1966.The team's primary colors are old gold and black; their logo is a simplified fleur-de-lis. They played their home games in Tulane Stadium through the 1974 NFL season. The following year, they moved to the new Louisiana Superdome (now the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, since Mercedes-Benz has purchased the stadium's naming rights).For most of their first 20 years, the Saints were barely competitive, only getting to .500 twice. In 1987, they finished 12–3—their first-ever winning season—and qualified for the NFL playoffs for the first time in franchise history, but lost to the Minnesota Vikings 44–10. The next season in 1988 ended with a 10–6 record, but no playoff berth. Following the 2000 regular season, the Saints defeated the defending Super Bowl champion St. Louis Rams 31–28 to notch their first-ever playoff win.

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and much of the Gulf Coast region. The Superdome was used as an emergency, temporary shelter for displaced residents. The stadium suffered damage from the hurricane (notably from flooding and part of the roof being torn off as well as internal damage from lack of available facilities). The Saints were forced to play their first scheduled home game against the New York Giants at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey (the Giants' home stadium); other home games were rescheduled at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas or Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. During the season, it was rumored that Saints' owner Tom Benson might deem the Superdome unusable and seek to legally void his contract and relocate the team to San Antonio, where he had business interests. Ultimately, however, the Superdome was repaired and renovated in time for the 2006 season at an estimated cost of US$185 million. The New Orleans Saints' first post-Katrina home game was an emotionally charged Monday Night Football game versus their division rival, the Atlanta Falcons. The Saints, under rookie head coach Sean Payton and new quarterback Drew Brees, defeated the Falcons 23–3, and went on to notch the second playoff win in franchise history.

The 2009 season was a historic one for the Saints. Winning a franchise-record 13 games, they qualified for Super Bowl XLIV and defeated the AFC champion Indianapolis Colts 31–17. To date, it is the only Super Bowl championship that they have won, and as it is the only Super Bowl the Saints have appeared in, they join the New York Jets and Tampa Bay Buccaneers as the only three NFL teams to win their lone Super Bowl appearance.

In 52 seasons (through 2018), the Saints' record was 371–446–5 (.454) overall, 362–435–5 in the regular season and 9–11 in the playoffs.

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